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ShadowThomas
03-10-2007, 12:44 AM
Today in history. March 10th 2007

the 69th day of 2007. There are 296 days left in the year. A reminder: Daylight-saving time begins Sunday at 2 a.m. locally. Clocks go forward one hour.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 10, 1876, the first successful voice transmission over Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone took place in Boston as his assistant heard Bell say, “Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you.” (The words were recounted by Bell in his lab notebook.)
On this date:

In 1629, England’s King Charles I dissolved Parliament; he did not call it back for 11 years.

In 1785, Thomas Jefferson was appointed minister to France, succeeding Benjamin Franklin.

In 1848, the Senate ratified the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the war with Mexico.

In 1880, the Salvation Army arrived in the United States from England.

In 1948, the body of the anti-Communist foreign minister of Czechoslovakia, Jan Masaryk, was found in the garden of Czernin Palace in Prague.

In 1949, Nazi wartime broadcaster Mildred E. Gillars, also known as “Axis Sally,” was convicted in Washington of treason. (She served 12 years in prison.)

In 1965, Neil Simon’s play “The Odd Couple,” starring Walter Matthau and Art Carney, opened on Broadway.

In 1969, James Earl Ray pleaded guilty in Memphis, Tenn., to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. (Ray later repudiated that plea, maintaining his innocence until his death.)

In 1980, “Scarsdale Diet” author Dr. Herman Tarnower was shot to death in Purchase, N.Y. (Tarnower’s former lover, Jean Harris, was convicted of murder; she served nearly 12 years in prison before being released in January 1993.)

In 1985, Konstantin U. Chernenko, Soviet leader for just 13 months, died at age 73.

Ten years ago: The White House and the FBI clashed in a rare public quarrel after President Clinton said he should have been alerted when the bureau told national security officials that the Chinese government might be trying to influence U.S. elections.

Five years ago: Israeli helicopters destroyed Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat’s office in Gaza City, hours after 11 Israelis were killed in a suicide bombing in a cafe across the street from Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s residence in Jerusalem. Russell Crowe won best actor honors at the Screen Actors Guild awards for “A Beautiful Mind” while Halle Berry won best actress for “Monster’s Ball.” Actress Irene Worth died in New York at age 85.

One year ago: Officials confirmed that Tom Fox, an American who was among four Christian activists kidnapped in Iraq, had been found slain. A NASA spacecraft, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, slipped into orbit around the Red Planet. Ohio State, acknowledging eight of nine violations alleged by the NCAA, was placed on three years’ probation. Opera singer Anna Moffo died in New York at age 73.

Today’s Birthdays: Talk show host Ralph Emery is 74. Bluegrass/country singer-musician Norman Blake is 69. Actor Chuck Norris is 67. Playwright David Rabe is 67. Singer Dean Torrence (Jan and Dean) is 67. Actress Katharine Houghton is 62. Rock musician Tom Scholz (Boston) is 60. Producer-director-writer Paul Haggis is 54. Actress Shannon Tweed is 50. Actress Sharon Stone is

49. Rock musician Gail Greenwood is 47. Magician Lance Burton is

47. Actress Jasmine Guy is 45. Rock musician Jeff Ament (Pearl Jam) is 44. Music producer Rick Rubin is 44. Britain’s Prince Edward is

43. Singer Edie Brickell is 41. Actor Stephen Mailer is 41. Actress Paget Brewster is 38. Country singer Daryle Singletary is 36. Rapper-producer Timbaland is 35. Actor Cristian de la Fuente is 33. Singer Robin Thicke is 30. Actress Bree Turner is 30. Olympic gold-medal gymnast Shannon Miller is 30. Country singer Carrie Underwood is 24. Actress Emily Osment is 15.

Thought for Today: “If the Phone Doesn’t Ring, It’s Me.” — Jimmy Buffett, American singer-songwriter.

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. Also a big thank you to, Admin. Steve for letting me have this thread as a, Sticky. :)

Enjoy everyone. :)

ShadowThomas
03-11-2007, 08:59 PM
Today in History - March 11

Today is Sunday, March 11, the 70th day of 2007. There are 295 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 11, 1942, as Japanese forces continued to advance in the Pacific during World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur left the Philippines for Australia, vowing: “I shall return.” (He kept that promise nearly three years later.)
On this date:

In 1810, Emperor Napoleon of France was married by proxy to Archduchess Marie Louise of Austria.

In 1861, the Confederate convention in Montgomery, Ala., adopted a constitution.

In 1888, the famous “Blizzard of ’88” began inundating the northeastern United States, resulting in some 400 deaths.

In 1941, President Roosevelt signed into law the Lend-Lease Bill, providing war supplies to countries fighting the Axis.

In 1957, Charles Van Doren’s 14-week run on the rigged NBC game show “Twenty-One” ended as he was “defeated” by attorney Vivienne Nearing; Van Doren’s take was $129,000.

In 1957, American explorer Richard E. Byrd died in Boston at age 68.

In 1965, the Rev. James J. Reeb, a white minister from Boston, died after being beaten by whites during civil rights disturbances in Selma, Ala.

In 1977, more than 130 hostages held in Washington, D.C., by Hanafi Muslims were freed after ambassadors from three Islamic nations joined the negotiations.

In 1985, Mikhail S. Gorbachev was chosen to succeed the late Soviet President Konstantin U. Chernenko.

In 2004, 10 bombs exploded in quick succession across the commuter rail network in Madrid, Spain, killing 191 people in an attack linked to al-Qaida.

Ten years ago: In a startling turnaround, Senate Republicans agreed to a broader investigation of campaign financing that would include a look at huge “soft money” donations. Senate confirmation hearings for CIA Director-designate Anthony Lake began. Paul McCartney was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

Five years ago: Two columns of light soared skyward from ground zero in New York as a temporary memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks. At the White House, President Bush unveiled a commemorative stamp to raise money to help Sept. 11 victims “get their lives back in order.” Israel lifted Yasser Arafat’s three-month confinement in the West Bank.

One year ago: Former Serb leader Slobodan Milosevic was found dead of a heart attack in his prison cell in the Netherlands, abruptly ending his four-year U.N. war crimes trial for orchestrating a decade of conflict that had killed a quarter of a million people; he was 64. Michelle Bachelet was sworn in as Chile’s first female president.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Terence Alexander is 84. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch is 76. ABC News correspondent Sam Donaldson is 73. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is 71. Musician Flaco Jimenez is 68. Actress Tricia O’Neil is 62. Actor Mark Metcalf is 61. Rock singer-musician Mark Stein (Vanilla Fudge) is 60. Singer Bobby McFerrin is 57. Movie director Jerry Zucker is 57. Actress Susan Richardson is 55. Recording executive Jimmy Iovine is 54. Singer Nina Hagen is 52. Country singer Jimmy Fortune (The Statler Brothers) is 52. Singer Cheryl Lynn is 50. Actress Alex Kingston is

44. Country musician David Talbot is 44. Actor Wallace Langham is

42. Actor John Barrowman is 40. Singer Lisa Loeb is 39. Singer Pete Droge is 38. Actor Terrence Howard is 38. Rock musician Rami Jaffee (Wallflowers) is 38. Actor Johnny Knoxville is 36. Rock singer-musicians Joel and Benji Madden (Good Charlotte) are 28. Actor David Anders is 26. Singer LeToya is 26. Actress Thora Birch is 25. Actor Anton Yelchin is 18.

Thought for Today: “There are some people who leave impressions not so lasting as the imprint of an oar upon the water.” — Kate Chopin, American writer (1851-1904).

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-13-2007, 06:14 AM
Today is Tuesday, March 13, the 72nd day of 2007. There are 293 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 13, 1925, a law went into effect in Tennessee prohibiting the teaching of the theory of evolution.
On this date:

In 1781, the planet Uranus was discovered by Sir William Herschel.

In 1884, Congress adopted Eastern Standard Time for the District of Columbia.

In 1901, the 23rd president of the United States, Benjamin Harrison, died in Indianapolis.

In 1933, banks began to reopen after a “holiday” declared by President Roosevelt.

In 1947, the Lerner and Loewe musical “Brigadoon” opened on Broadway.

In 1964, bar manager Catherine “Kitty” Genovese, 28, was stabbed to death near her New York City home; the case generated controversy over charges that Genovese’s neighbors had failed to respond to her cries for help.

In 1969, the Apollo 9 astronauts splashed down, ending a mission that included the successful testing of the Lunar Module.

In 1980, Ford Motor Co. Chairman Henry Ford II announced he was stepping down.

In 1980, a jury in Winamac, Ind., found Ford Motor Co. innocent of reckless homicide in the fiery deaths of three young women riding in a Ford Pinto.

In 1996, a gunman burst into an elementary school in Dunblane, Scotland, and opened fire on a class of kindergartners, killing 16 children and one teacher before killing himself.

Ten years ago: A Jordanian soldier fired on Israeli junior high school girls on a field trip, killing seven of them. (The soldier, Corp. Ahmed Daqamseh, was later sentenced by a military court to life in prison.) In a southern Egyptian village, four masked militants shot and killed 14 people before escaping.

Five years ago: President Bush declared at a news conference that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was a menace “and we’re going to deal with him,” and said Osama bin Laden had been reduced to a marginal figure in the war on terrorism.

One year ago: Deadly tornadoes raked the Midwest while wildfires scorched the Texas Panhandle. Publisher McClatchy Co. agreed to buy Knight-Ridder, but planned to immediately sell 12 of its newspapers. Black Sabbath and Blondie entered the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Actress Maureen Stapleton died in Lenox, Mass., at age 80; game show host Peter Tomarken, 63, and his wife, Kathleen, were killed when their small plane crashed into California’s Santa Monica Bay.

Today’s Birthdays: Jazz musician Roy Haynes is 82. Country singer Jan Howard is 77. Songwriter Mike Stoller is 74. Singer-songwriter Neil Sedaka is 68. Actor William H. Macy is 57. Actress Deborah Raffin is 54. Comedian Robin Duke is 53. Actress Glenne Headly is 52. Actress Dana Delany is 51. Rock musician Adam Clayton (U2) is 47. Jazz musician Terence Blanchard is 45. Actor Christopher Collet is 39. Actress Annabeth Gish is 36. Actress Tracy Wells is 36. Rapper Common is 35. Rapper Khujo (Goodie Mob, The Lumberjacks) is 35. Singer Glenn Lewis is 32. Actor Danny Masterson is 31. Actor Emile Hirsch is 22. Singers Natalie and Nicole Albino (Nina Sky) are 21.

Thought for Today: “The history of the world is the verdict of the world.” — Friedrich von Schiller, German author (1759-1805).

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-13-2007, 11:59 PM
Today is Wednesday, March 14, the 73rd day of 2007. There are 292 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 14, 1794, Eli Whitney received a patent for his cotton gin, an invention that revolutionized America’s cotton industry.

On this date:

In 1900, Congress ratified the Gold Standard Act.

In 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt signed an executive order designed to prevent Japanese laborers from immigrating to the United States as part of a “gentlemen’s agreement” with Japan.

In 1923, President Harding became the first chief executive to file an income tax report.

In 1939, the republic of Czechoslovakia was dissolved, opening the way for Nazi occupation of Czech areas and the separation of Slovakia.

In 1951, during the Korean War, United Nations forces recaptured Seoul.

In 1964, a jury in Dallas found Jack Ruby guilty of murdering Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of President Kennedy.

In 1965, Israel’s cabinet formally approved establishment of diplomatic relations with West Germany.

In 1967, the body of President Kennedy was moved from a temporary grave to a permanent memorial site at Arlington National Cemetery.

In 1980, a Polish airliner crashed while making an emergency landing near Warsaw, killing all 87 people aboard, including 22 members of a U.S. amateur boxing team.

In 1991, a British court reversed the convictions of the Birmingham 6, who had spent 16 years in prison for an Irish Republican Army bombing, and ordered them released.

Ten years ago: Surgeons at Bethesda Naval Medical Center repaired a painful torn knee tendon in President Clinton’s right leg; the injury had been caused by a freak middle-of-the-night stumble at the Florida home of golfer Greg Norman.

Five years ago: The government charged the Arthur Andersen accounting firm with obstruction of justice, securing its first indictment in the collapse of Enron. Serbia and Montenegro signed a historic accord to radically restructure their federation, dropping the name “Yugoslavia” and granting greater autonomy to prevent the country’s final breakup.

One year ago: Iraqi authorities reported discovering at least 87 corpses — those of men shot to death execution-style — as Iraq edged closer to open civil warfare. Israel raided a jail in the West Bank town of Jericho, seizing six militants, after the new Hamas-led Palestinian government said it would release the men. A reservoir dam in Hawaii burst, releasing a torrent of water that killed seven people.

Today’s Birthdays: Former astronaut Frank Borman is 79. Singer Phil Phillips is 76. Actor Michael Caine is 74. Composer-conductor Quincy Jones is 74. Former astronaut Eugene Cernan is 73. Movie director Wolfgang Petersen is 66. Country singer Michael Martin Murphey is 62. Rock musician Walt Parazaider (Chicago) is 62. Actor Steve Kanaly is 61. Comedian Billy Crystal is 59. Country singer Jann Browne is 53. Actor Adrian Zmed is 53. Prince Albert of Monaco is 49. Actress Tamara Tunie is 48. Actress Penny Johnson Jerald is

46. Producer-director-writer Kevin Williamson is 42. Actress Megan Follows is 39. Rock musician Michael Bland is 38. Country singer Kristian Bush is 37. Rock musician Derrick (Jimmie’s Chicken Shack) is 35. Actor Jake Fogelnest is 28. Actor Chris Klein is 28. Actress Kate Maberly is 25. Singer-musician Taylor Hanson (Hanson) is 24.

Thought for Today: “Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy.” — Ayn Rand, American author (1905-1982).



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
03-15-2007, 07:56 PM
Waiting Shadow.... ;) :D

ShadowThomas
03-15-2007, 11:44 PM
Waiting Shadow.... ;) :D
:D

Thursday, March 15, 2007
#1 ALBUM DAY.

Billboard magazine began a new feature. It was the record chart of top albums. What album was the first to top this new chart? For those who thought it was something by Lauryn Hill, move two steps back, please. For those who thought it was a wax cylinder from Thomas Edison and the Record Rappers, jump back another three spaces. If, however, you said that the first album to reach #1 on this day in 1945 was The King Cole Trio, you are absolutely correct!

Of course, the albums mentioned on the Billboard list were, for several years, 78 rpm disks, not the 33-1/3 albums we came to know. Billboard and other trade magazines continue to list the week’s top albums. Billboard lists the Top 200 in order, from #1 on down. Some even have ‘bullets’ to reflect the week’s top movement in sales and radio airplay.
Events
March 15
44BC - In the ancient Roman calendar, each of the 12 months had an ‘ides’ of the month. In March, May, July and October, the ides fell on the 15th day. In all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. The word ‘ides’ was derived from the Latin “to divide.” The ides were originally meant to mark the full moon, but since the solar calendar months and lunar months were of different lengths, the ides eventually lost their original intent and purpose. We only remember March as the month that has Ides because it was on this day that Roman Emperor Julius Caesar was assassinated. William Shakespeare helped to promote the Ides of March. He sure knew how to run a PR campaign.

1820 - Maine joined the 22 states of the United States of America. Travel way up to the far northeastern tip of the U.S., where many pine trees grow, and you’ll be in Maine, the Pine Tree State. Coincidentally, the white pine cone with its tassel is the state flower; and since the chickadee makes its nest in the pine tree, we figure that’s why it is the state bird. The landlocked salmon is the state fish, the tourmaline is the state mineral and the state song is ... we’re not kidding ... “State of Maine Song”. ‘I direct’ is the state motto which is ‘dirigo’ in Latin. How about all of us who know the origin of the name, Maine, getting together for a Maine lobster dinner! We learned that its first use was to distinguish the mainland from islands offshore. Maine was also thought to be named in honor of Henrietta Maria, Charles I of England’s queen. She owned a province in France titled, Mayne. And, last but not least, Augusta is the capital of Maine (not Georgia).

1869 - The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first professional baseball team in America, had quite a day in Yellow Springs, OH, where they trounced Antioch 41-7. They weren’t even the Big Red Machine back then! In fact, the team was so embarrassed about their name, they changed it to Cincinnati Red Legs and even after that, (but long before Pete Rose) they became the Cincinnati Reds.

1913 - U.S. President Woodrow Wilson held the first open presidential news conference just 11 days after his inauguration.

1937 - The first blood bank was established -- in Chicago, IL at the Cook County Hospital. Have some cookies and maybe an orange to celebrate...

1945 - Celebrities sauntered into Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Los Angeles to celebrate the best of 1944. For the 17th time, the Academy Awards were presented by Hollywood -- to Hollywood. These Oscar awards were the first broadcast in entirety over the ABC radio network and Armed Forces Radio around the world. Co-hosts for the big show were actor/director John Cromwell (first half) and actor/comedian Bob Hope (second half). The Oscar for Best Picture went to the musical comedy, Going My Way. Best Director was Leo McCarey, who also wrote (Oscar: Best Writing/Original Story) and produced the Bing Crosby (Best Actor)/Barry Fitzgerald (nominated for Best Actor/winner of Best Supporting Actor) gem. Going My Way also scored an Academy Award for music (James Van Heusen), lyrics (Johnny Burke) for the song Swinging on a Star (a hit for Crosby, as was Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra, also from the film) and Best Writing/Screenplay (Frank Butler, Frank Cavett). Interesting trivia note: Some years later, while practicing a golf swing in his living room, Crosby knocked the head off the then plaster-cast Oscar statuette he earned from the movie. Best Actress Oscar was given to Ingrid Bergman for Gaslight and Best Supporting Actress was Ethel Barrymore for None But the Lonely Heart. We hope you’ve been paying attention. There may be a quiz later...

1948 - Sir Laurence Olivier was on the cover of LIFE magazine for his starring role in Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

1954 - CBS television inaugurated its Morning Show. The host? None other than the man who would become “The most trusted man in America,” Walter Cronkite. Uncle Walter was called “host, ring-master and coordinator” in the network’s attempt to compete against the already three-year-old Today show on NBC. Cronkite was a ‘nice’ host, but clearly out of his news element and the show was a ratings disappointment. Jack Paar took over as host some time later. The show still didn’t work. The program immediately following did work, however. That show was Captain Kangaroo.

1956 - The musical, My Fair Lady, opened on Broadway. The show ran for 6-1/2 years before 2,717 audiences. It became, thanks to Rex Harrison and an outstanding cast, the longest-running musical to that time.

1959 - The musical, No Strings, opened on Broadway at the 54th Street Theatre. Richard Kiley and Diahann Carroll starred in the show. Also featured was the show’s composer in an acting role, singing his own lyrics. The composer was Richard Rodgers.

1964 - Wedding bells (the first time) for actor Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. The couple wed in secret ceremonies in Montreal, Canada.

1968 - LIFE magazine called Jimi Hendrix, “the most spectacular guitarist in the world.”

1968 - Bob Beamon set an indoor long jump record as he, literally, flew 27 feet, 2-3/4 inches.

1970 - The musical, Purlie, opened a run of 680 continuous performances on Broadway in New York City.

1971 - CBS television made a major announcement, saying that it was dropping The Ed Sullivan Show from its program line-up after 23 years on the network. The Sullivan show, a Sunday night fixture, presented everyone from the Beatles and dancing bears to a talking mouse named Topo Gigio, plus anyone and anything in between. It was the longest-running show in television history. “Kissa-me goo-night, Eddie...” (The final show aired June 6, 1971.)

1977 - The first episode of Eight is Enough was aired on ABC-TV. Mark Hamill starred in the opening show and, for a very few shows, as son, David. After talking to star, Dick Van Patten, Hamill said, “Enough!” He left to star in the motion picture, Star Wars as Luke Skywalker, gaining considerable notoriety from the George Lucas film epic.

1985 - Larry Holmes beat David Bey in Las Vegas, NV. This was probably good for Bey, since no one had heard of him in the first place. Holmes defended his International Boxing Federation heavyweight boxing title with the win. Holmes said after the fight that his career was probably over and that he would retire as no other heavyweight champ had done -- undefeated. Bey was notch number 47-in-a-row in Holmes’ belt buckle. Of course, Holmes would quit to come back another day. What happened to Bey? Hey, we didn’t hear from him again.

1987 - The place: Orlando, Florida. The golf course: the Arnold Palmer-designed Bay Hill layout. The tournament: the Bay Hill Classic. Don Pooley showed the golf world what a true million-dollar swing looked like, as he made a hole in one during the final round. The tournament sponsor had offered a million dollars to anyone making an ace. Pooley didn’t win the tourney, but won a lot more than anyone else...
Birthdays
March 15
1767 - Andrew Jackson
7th U.S. President [1829-1837]; married to Rachel Robards; nickname: Old Hickory [died June 8, 1845]

1907 - Jimmy McPartland
jazz musician: cornetist; played for the Wolverine Orchestra, Embassy Four; bandleader; actor: The Magic Horn; played at Newport Jazz Festival with wife, Marian; died Mar 12, 1991

1913 - MacDonald Carey
actor: “Like sands through the hourglass these are the Days of Our Lives”; Comanche Territory, The Rebels, Who is the Black Dahlia, Access Code; died Mar 21, 1994

1916 - Harry (Haag) James
trumpeter, bandleader: Sweet Georgia Brown, Chiribiribin, And the Angels Sing, Two O’clock Jump, You Made Me Love You, Music Makers, Strictly Instrumental, I’ll Get By; married to Betty Grable (second of four wives); died July 5, 1983

1926 - Norm Van Brocklin
Pro Football Hall of Famer: quarterback: LA Rams, Philadelphia Eagles; died May 2, 1983

1927 - Carl Smith
country singer: Let’s Live a Little, Loose Talk, Trademark, Satisfaction Guaranteed; actor: The Badge of Marshall Brennan, Buffalo Guns; member: Grand Ole Opry

1932 - Alan (LaVern) Bean
astronaut: lunar module pilot: Apollo 12 [man’s second lunar landing], fourth man to set foot on the moon [Nov 19, 1969]; commander of Skylab 3 mission [U.S.’ first space station: 1973]

1933 - Cecil Taylor
jazz pianist, international concert artist, composer; taught black music and led Black Music Ensemble at U. of Wisconsin, Antioch, N.J. Glassboro State

1935 - Judd Hirsch
Emmy Award-winning actor: Taxi [1980-81,1982-83]; Ordinary People, The Good-bye People, Running on Empty

1935 - Jimmy (Lee) Swaggert
TV evangelist: Jimmy Swaggart Ministries; cousin of singer Jerry Lee Lewis

1940 - Phil Lesh (Chapman)
musician: bass: group: Grateful Dead: St. Stephen, China Cat Sunflower, Dark Star, Uncle John’s Band, New Speedway Boogie, Truckin’, Box of Rain, Alabama Gateway; composer: electronic music

1941 - Mike Love
singer, songwriter: group: The Beach Boys: I Get Around, Help Me Rhonda, Good Vibrations, California Girls, Surfin’ USA, Little Deuce Coupe, Surfer Girl, Be True to Your School

1944 - David Costell
musician: bass: group: Gary Lewis & The Playboys: This Diamond Ring

1944 - Sly Stone (Sylvester Stewart)
musician, singer: group: Sly & The Family Stone: Dance to the Music, Everyday People, Hot Fun in the Summertime, Thank You, Family Affair; Former San Francisco DJ

1946 - Bobby (Lee) Bonds
baseball: SF Giants [individual record for season strikeouts [189 in 1970/all-star: 1971, 1973], NY Yankees, California Angels, Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians, SL Cardinals, Chicago Cubs; father of baseball’s Barry Bonds; died Aug 23, 2003

1946 - Howard Scott
musician: guitar, singer: group: War: LPs: All Day Music, The World is a Ghetto, Why Can’t We be Friends?

1947 - Ry (Ryland) Cooder
musician: guitar: Sister Morphine, Ditty Wah Ditty [w/Earl Hines]; composer: Mama Don’t Treat Your Daughter Mean, UFO Has Landed in the Ghetto, I’m Drinking Again, Hard Workin’ Man

1954 - Craig Wasson
actor: Body Double, Malcolm X, Phyllis, A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

1955 - Dee Snider
composer, singer: group: Twisted Sister: We’re Not Gonna Take It

1961 - Fabio (Lanzoni)
model: covers of romance novels; writer: Pirate

1962 - Terence Trent D’Arby
singer, songwriter: Wishing Well, LP: Introducing the Hard Line

1964 - Rockwell (Kennedy William Gordy)
singer: Somebody’s Watching Me; son of Motown founder, Berry Gordy
Chart Toppers
March 15
1946Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Let It Snow - Vaughn Monroe
Symphony - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Clyde Rogers)
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954Make Love to Me! - Jo Stafford
I Get So Lonely - The Four Knights
Answer Me, My Love - Nat ‘King’ Cole
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962Hey! Baby - Bruce Channel
Midnight in Moscow - Kenny Ball & His Jazzmen
Don’t Break the Heart that Loves You - Connie Francis
Misery Loves Company - Porter Wagoner

1970Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel
Travelin’ Band/Who’ll Stop the Rain - Creedence Clearwater Revival
The Rapper - The Jaggerz
It’s Just a Matter of Time - Sonny James

1978(Love Is) Thicker Than Water - Andy Gibb
Night Fever - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys - Waylon &
Willie

1986Sara - Starship
These Dreams - Heart
Secret Lovers - Atlantic Starr
I Could Get Used to You - Exile


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-15-2007, 11:48 PM
75th day of 2007 - 290 remaining

Friday, March 16, 2007
LE ROI DU CRAZY DAY.

Who could have known that Joseph Levitch, the baby boy born on this day in 1926 in Newark, New Jersey, would someday wear the crown of the ‘King of Crazy’! Maybe his father had a clue when he introduced his five year old on stage at Brown’s Hotel in Loch Sheldrake, NY. Little Joey sang, Brother, Can You Spare a Dime. Today, that theatre bears the name of this actor, singer, dancer, musician, comedian, producer, professor, and humanitarian. Maybe you’ve been to the Jerry Lewis Theatre in the borscht belt in upstate New York. Certainly, you’ve seen Jerry Lewis perform.

Maybe your first experience was seeing him in his role as the goofy partner of the suave, romantic Dean Martin. From 1946, when the two performed together for the first time in Atlantic City’s 500 Club, till a decade later when the partners split; we were entertained with club appearances and no less than a dozen movies. The first, My Friend Irma, premiered at New York’s Paramount Theatre. The opening stage act starred Martin and Lewis in person.

Jerry Lewis’ mugging skills became the central force behind many of the movies the two made. Films like That’s My Boy and The Caddy catapulted him into stardom. From 1951 through 1959, Jerry’s name appeared in the top ten of box-office stars (6 years with his partner and 3 solo). In fact, in 1959, Paramount signed him to a fourteen-film contract for ten million dollars -- probably the most expensive contract signed with a performer at the time. He was back in the top ten from 1961 through 1964 and had received acclaim as Best Director for The Nutty Professor from the French.

Comedian, film star and director was never enough for the zany, talented Lewis. He had a top-ten hit in 1956, Rock-A-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody; his own TV variety show from 1965 to 1974 and he continued to make movies, work the club circuit, and teach film at USC. His devotion to supporting the Muscular Dystrophy Association is known world wide. There are few who have never seen the annual Labor Day Telethon for MDA hosted by the untiring Jerry Lewis. Undaunted by protesters he continues the quest to raise money to help those stricken with neuromuscular diseases.

And, undaunted by the fact that his talents have never been truly recognized by his fellow Americans, Jerry Lewis continues to entertain us. A cult hero to the French, he remains ‘Le Roi du Crazy’.
Events
March 16
1850 - The novel, The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, was published for the first time. Attention: Any sweater with a big letter “A” on it should not be worn today! So, please, put the letter sweaters away for a day, ok? Thank you. In case you forgot, other novels by Mr. Hawthorne included The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun, Twice-Told Tales, Tanglewood Tales and The Wonder Book.

1871 - The state of Delaware, the first state to enter the union, enacted the first fertilizer law.

1882 - The U.S. Senate approved a treaty allowing the United States to join the Red Cross.

1915 - The Federal Trade Commission began operation. The U.S. government appointed five commissioners to receive $10,000 each year to regulate commerce and prohibit unlawful trade.

1934 - The 6th celebration of movieland’s achievements, The Academy Awards for the films of 1932 and 1933, was held at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles with humorist/actor/writer Will Rogers as host. Only one film from 1932 captured honors. Harold C. Lewis of the Paramount Studio Sound Department won the Best Sound/Recording award for A Farewell to Arms. The Best Picture and Best Director Frank Lloyd) prizes went to the 1933 flick, Cavalcade produced by Winfield R. Sheehan. The Best Actor was Charles Laughton in The Private Life of Henry VIII, and the Best Actress was Katharine Hepburn in Morning Glory (1933). This was her first Academy Award, and the last she would receive for 34 years. The second cartoon to take home (to their little brick house) an Oscar was Walt Disney’s The Three Little Pigs for Best Short Subjects/Cartoons.

1937 - Former world champion hurdler, Percy Beard, was hired by the Brooklyn Dodgers to teach the faltering baseball team how to run.

1942 - Fats Waller recorded The Jitterbug Waltz in New York for Bluebird Records.

1950 - Congress voted to remove federal taxes on oleomargarine.

1955 - The Ballad of Davy Crockett, by Bill Hayes, reached the number one spot on the pop music charts and stayed for five weeks beginning this day. The smash hit song sold more than 7,000,000 records on more than 20 different labels. Everyone seemed to be singing the song that saluted the frontier hero who was “Born on a mountain top in Tennessee...” Coonskin caps were seen everywhere as the Crockett craze spread like a frontier fire.

1963 - Peter, Paul and Mary released the single, Puff The Magic Dragon. Through the years, controversy continually surrounded the song. It was banned by several radio stations whose management figured that the song was about the elicit joys of smoking marijuana. The group denied this startling assumption. “It’s about a magic dragon named Puff,” they said. So there. The trio recorded a dozen hits that charted between 1962 and 1969. Puff was their third song. It went to number two on the pop charts and puffed around for nearly three months. The group next did a Bob Dylan protest song, Blowin’ in the Wind and ended a sterling career with a John Denver song -- the group’s biggest -- Leaving on a Jet Plane.

1964 - Paul Hornung, ‘The Golden Boy’, and Alex Karras, the guy who punched out a horse in the movie, Blazing Saddles, were reinstated to the NFL after an 11-month suspension for betting on football games.

1985 - A Chorus Line played performance number 4,000 this night at New York’s famed Shubert Theatre. The show originally opened in July, 1975, and became the longest-running show to light up the Great White Way in September, 1983.

1985 - People magazine listed the top 57 money-making show-biz stars. At the pinnacle was Paul McCartney, former Beatle and leader of the group, Wings, whose music empire was said to be worth $500 million. Bob Hope made the list with a worth of about $200 million.

1987 - Bostonia magazine printed an English translation of Albert Einstein’s last high school report card. The brain behind the theory of relativity did relatively well with an ‘A’ in math, of course, but a ‘D’ in French.
Birthdays
March 16
1751 - James Madison
4th U.S. President [1809-1817]; married to Dorothea ‘Dolly’ Todd; nickname: Father of the Constitution; died June 28, 1836

1822 - Rosa Bonheur
artist: famous for her animal paintings: The Horse Fair; 1st woman to be awarded the Grand Cross of the Legion d’Honneur; died May 25, 1899

1897 - Conrad Nagel
actor: The Mysterious Lady, The Kiss, The Divorcee; died Feb 24, 1970

1906 - Henny (Henry) Youngman
comedian: “Take my wife ... please.”, Joe & Dad, The Henny and Rocky Show; actor: Amazon Women on the Moon, National Lampoon Goes to the Movies, The Unkissed Bride, Goodfellas [cameo]; died Feb 24, 1998

1912 - Pat Nixon (Ryan)
former U.S. First Lady: Married to 37th U.S. President Richard M. Nixon; died June 22, 1993

1920 - Leo McKern
actor: A Foreign Field, The Mouse that Roared, A Man for All Seasons, Help, Rumpole of the Bailey, Ladyhawke, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, The Blue Lagoon, Ryan’s Daughter; died July 23, 2002

1926 - Jerry Lewis (Joseph Levitch)
comedian, actor; see Le Roi du Crazy Day [above]

1927 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
U.S. Senator from New York; died Mar 26, 2003

1927 - Ruby (Reuben) Braff
modern jazz musician: trumpet, cornet; actor: Pipe Dream

1930 - Hobie (Hobert Neal) Landrith
baseball: catcher: Cincinnati Reds, Cincinnati Redlegs, Chicago Cubs, SL Cardinals, SF Giants, Baltimore Orioles, NY Mets, Washington Senators

1932 - Don (Lee) Blasingame
baseball: SL Cardinals [all-star: 1958], SF Giants, Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1961], Washington Senators, KC Athletics

1932 - R. Walter Cunningham
astronaut: Apollo 7 mission [circled Earth 173 times: Oct, 1968]; chief of Skylab applications program [supervised development and design]

1932 - Betty Johnson
singer: I Dreamed, Little White Lies, The Little Blue Man, Dream

1940 - Bernardo Bertolucci
Academy Award-winning director: The Last Emperor [1987]; Stealing Beauty, Little Buddha, Once Upon a Time in the West, Last Tango in Paris, The Grim Reaper

1942 - Roger Crozier
hockey: NHL: Detroit Red Wings [Stanley Cup playoff MVP: 1966], Buffalo Sabres, Washington Capitals; died Jan 11, 1996

1942 - MacArthur Lane
football: Green Bay Packers

1942 - Jerry Jeff Walker (Paul Crosby)
country singer, guitarist: Mr. Bojangles, Good Loving Grace, My Old Man, Hill Country Rain, Charlie Dunn

1947 - Tom (Thomas William) Bradley
baseball: pitcher: California Angels, Chicago White Sox, SF Giants

1949 - Erik Estrada
actor: C.H.I.P.S., Twisted Justice, Night of the Wilding, Caged Fury, The Dirty Dozen: The Fatal Mission

1950 - Kate Nelligan
actress: Up Close and Personal, Fatal Instinct, Eye of the Needle, Frankie and Johnny, The Prince of Tides, Dracula, The Count of Monte Cristo

1950 - Tim Stokes
football: Univ of Oregon, LA Rams

1951 - Brian McKenzie
hockey: Pittsburgh Penguins, Omaha Knights, Hershey Bears, Edmonton Oilers, Mohawk Valley Comets, Indianapolis Racers, Toledo Goaldiggers, Milwaukee Admirals

1953 - Isabelle Huppert
actress: Le Ceremonie, The Separation, Violette, Story of Women, Entre Nous

1954 - Hollis Stacy
golf champion: U.S. Open [1977, 1978, 1984]; Du Maurier Classic [1983]

1954 - Nancy Wilson (Nancy Lamoureux Wilson)
musician: guitar, singer: group: Heart: Crazy on You, Magic Man, Barracuda, Straight On; actress: Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Wild Life

Chart Toppers
March 16
1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Managua, Nicaragua - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Don Rodney)
Oh, But I Do - Margaret Whiting
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Sincerely - McGuire Sisters
Pledging My Love - Johnny Ace
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 Walk like a Man - The 4 Seasons
Our Day Will Come - Ruby & The Romantics
You’re the Reason I’m Living - Bobby Darin
The Ballad of Jed Clampett - Flatt & Scruggs

1971 One Bad Apple - The Osmonds
Me and Bobby McGee - Janis Joplin
For All We Know - Carpenters
I’d Rather Love You - Charley Pride

1979 I Will Survive - Gloria Gaynor
Tragedy - Bee Gees
Heaven Knows - Donna Summer with Brooklyn Dreams
Golden Tears - Dave & Sugar

1987 Jacob’s Ladder - Huey Lewis & The News
Somewhere Out There - Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram
Let’s Wait Awhile - Janet Jackson
Baby’s Got a New Baby - S-K-O


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-18-2007, 12:06 AM
Sunday, March 18, 2007
PENNY LANE DAY.

The Beatles went gold this day in 1967 -- receiving a gold record for the hit single, Penny Lane. This was not an unusual event for The Beatles. However, the recording of Penny Lane has left us with some interesting trivia.

According to Paul McCartney, Penny Lane is a bus roundabout in Liverpool; and there is a barber’s shop showing photographs of every head he’s had the pleasure to know -- no that’s not true, they’re just photos of hairstyles, but all the people who come and go stop and say hello. “It’s part fact, part nostalgia for a place which is a great place, blue suburban skies as we remember it, and it’s still there.”

There were at least two different endings to the song. Radio stations were furnished with a 45 rpm version that featured a trumpet solo of seven notes, sustaining on the final note into Ringo’s cymbal conclusion. Record buyers, on the other hand, heard the words “Penny Lane” at the end of the song, which then went into a sustaining note under Ringo’s cymbal. There was no trumpet fanfare.

The original version shows up on the Rarities album on Capitol Records. Those having the original ‘Promotional Copy’ of the song have quite a valuable find. Penny Lane is also included on the American release of the Magical Mystery Tour album, but not the British EP version. While a number one song in America, Penny Lane made it to number two in England, causing some to wonder “if The Beatles were beginning to slip,” according to The Beatles -- An Illustrated Record.

The ‘B’ side of gold record was the popular Strawberry Fields Forever.
Events
March 18
1813 - David Melville of Newport, Rhode Island patented the gas streetlight. He celebrated by having the new lights installed in front of his house!

1902 - Enrico Caruso recorded 10 arias for the Gramophone Company. The recording session took place in Milan, Italy and Caruso walked away with $500 for his effort.

1910 - Hold on to your hats! The opera, Pipe of Desire, was first performed this day at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. Frederick Sheperd Converse wrote the work that turned out to be the first opera by an American composer to be performed at the Met.

1918 - The first seagoing ship made of concrete was launched at Redwood City, CA, near San Francisco. The ship was named Faith and those who launched her had plenty of that. They had faith that the vessel wouldn’t sink. It didn’t. Faith cost $750,000 to build.

1931 - Schick, Inc., the razor company, displayed the first electric shaver -- in Stamford, CT.

1940 - Light of the World was first heard on NBC radio. The soap opera was unique in that it featured the Bible as the center of the story line.

1940 - Glen Gray and his orchestra recorded No Name Jive on Decca Records.

1953 - Major-league baseball announced the first team relocation since 1903. The Boston Braves told of their plans to move west to Milwaukee, WI. The Red Sox stayed in Beantown. After almost two more decades, the Braves moved again, this time they went south to Atlanta. The Brewers then took over Milwaukee County Stadium.

1954 - How’s this for confidence? RKO Pictures was sold to become the first motion picture studio to be owned by an individual. That person was none other than Howard Hughes. The selling price? $23,489,478.

1959 - Bill Sharman of the Boston Celtics began what was to be the longest string of successful consecutive free throws (56 in a row) to set a new National Basketball Association record.

1970 - Brook Benton received a gold record for the hit single, Rainy Night in Georgia. It was Benton’s first hit since 1963’s Hotel Happiness.

1978 - The Bee Gees started an eight-week stay at the top of the pop music charts with Night Fever (they had a total of nine #1 hits) from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. Makes you want to get out that white suit and black shirt, doesn’t it?

1985 - The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) announced plans to merge with Capital Cities Communications to form Cap Cities/ABC. The $3.5 billion merger was the 11th largest corporate merger in U.S. history.

1985 - History was made in the short-lived United States Football League this day. A pro football record was set by Denver and Houston of the USFL with a total of 112 passes thrown in the game. Houston went airborne 69 times, Denver took to the air 43 times.

1986 - The U.S. Treasury Department announced that a clear, polyester thread was to be woven into bills in an effort to thwart counterfeiters.

Birthdays
March 18

1782 - John Calhoun
U.S. Vice President under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson [1825-1832]; the first VP to resign office: became a U.S. Senator; died Mar 31, 1850

1837 - Grover (Stephen) Cleveland
22nd [1885-1889] & 24th [1893-1897] U.S. President; only one to serve 2 nonconsecutive terms; only president to be married in White House [to Frances Folsom (2 sons, 3 daughters)]; the 1st to have a child born there; died June 24, 1908

1844 - Nikolai (Nikolay Andreyevich) Rimsky-Korsakov
composer: Scheherazade, Song of India, The Flight of the Bumblebee; died June 21, 1908

1886 - Edward Everett Horton
narrator: Fractured Fairy Tales on The Bullwinkle Show; actor: It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Lost Horizon, Sex and the Single Girl, Arsenic and Old Lace; died Sep 29, 1970

1901 - William H. (Henry) Johnson
artist: expressionist: Minnie, Sun Setting, Denmark; returned to U.S. when Hitler began destroying African and primitive themes; known later for historical African-American figures & events: Going to Church, Mom and Dad; died in 1970

1911 - Smiley (Lester Alvin) Burnette
actor: Western Double Features, Gene Autry Matinee Double Features, Dick Tracy: The Original Serial, King of the Cowboys, Springtime in the Rockies, Silver Spurs; died Feb 16, 1967

1923 - Andy Granatelli
auto racer: “STP is the racer’s edge.”

1926 - Peter Graves (Aurness)
actor: Mission Impossible, The Winds of War, Airplane, Airplane 2, Stalag 17, The President’s Plane is Missing, The Night of the Hunter; brother of actor James Arness

1927 - George Plimpton
author: Paper Lion, Shadow Box actor: Rio Lobo, Reds, Little Man Tate, Just Cause; died Sep 26, 2003

1932 - John Updike
writer: The Witches of Eastwicke, Rabbit Run

1936 - Frederik Willem de Klerk
president: South Africa [1989-1994]; recipient [with Nelson Mandela] of Nobel Peace Prize [1993] for democratization of South Africa

1937 - Mark Donohue
auto racer: Indianapolis 500 winner [1972]; killed practicing for Austrian Grand Prix at Graz, Austria Aug 19, 1975

1938 - Shashi Kapoor
actor: Gulliver’s Travels, Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, Heat and Dust, The Householder

1938 - Charley Pride
country singer: Kiss an Angel Good Mornin’, Why Baby Why; member of Grand Ol’ Opry, CMA Entertainer of the Year [1971], Male Vocalist of the Year [1971-1972]; semipro baseball player

1941 - Margie Bowes
country entertainer: Grand Ole Opry; married to Doyle Wilburn of the Wilburn Brothers

1941 - Pat (Robert Patrick) Jarvis
baseball: pitcher: Atlanta Braves, Montreal Expos

1941 - Wilson Pickett
singer: In the Midnight Hour, Land of 1000 Dances, Funky Broadway, Mustang Sally, It’s Too Late, Don’t Knock My Love; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer [1991]; died Jan 19, 2006

1942 - Jeff Mullins
basketball: Duke Univ. All-American, 1964 Olympics, Atlanta Hawks

1943 - Kevin Dobson
actor: Kojak, Knots Landing, Shannon, Dirty Work, Code of Honor, Midway

1947 - B.J. (Barrie James) Wilson
musician: drummer: group: Procol Harum: Whiter Shade of Pale; died Oct 8, 1990

1948 - Guy Lapointe
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, SL Blues, Boston Bruins

1950 - Brad Dourif
actor: Phoenix, Color of Night, Wild Palms, Final Judgement, Jungle Fever, Body Parts, Mississippi Burning, Blue Velvet, Dune, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Studs Lonigan

1950 - John Hartman
musician: drums: group: The Doobie Brothers: Listen to the Music, Long Train Runnin’, China Grove, Black Water, What a Fool Believes; veterinarian

1952 - Glenn McDonald
basketball: Long Beach State Univ., Boston Celtics

1952 - Mike Webster ‘Iron Mike’: Pro Football Hall of Famer: Pittsburgh Steelers center [1974-1988]: Super Bowl IX, X, XIII, XIV; played more seasons [15] and more games [220] than any player in Steelers’ history; died Sep 24, 2002

1956 - Ingemar Stenmark
Swedish skier: holds individual racing record of 86 wins including 46 giant slalom and 40 slalom out of 287 contests, [1974-1989]

1959 - Irene Cara
singer: Fame, The Dream; actress: Fame, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Caged in Paradiso, City Heat, For Us the Living, Killing ’Em Softly

1963 - Vanessa L. Williams
singer: LPs: The Comfort Zone, The Sweetest Days; actress: Eraser, Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man; Broadway: Kiss of the Spider Woman, Into The Woods; Miss America 1984

1964 - Bonnie Blair
Olympic Gold medalist [1988] and world record holder: speed skater [1994]

Chart Toppers

March 18
1949 Far Away Places - Margaret Whiting
Powder Your Face with Sunshine - Evelyn Knight
Cruising Down the River - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The
Skyliners)
Don’t Rob Another Man’s Castle - Eddy Arnold

1957 Young Love - Tab Hunter
Round and Round - Perry Como
Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
There You Go - Johnny Cash

1965 Eight Days a Week - The Beatles
Stop! In the Name of Love - The Supremes
The Birds and the Bees - Jewel Akens
I’ve Got a Tiger by the Tail - Buck Owens

1973 Killing Me Softly with His Song - Roberta Flack
Love Train - O’Jays
Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001) - Deodato
Teddy Bear Song - Barbara Fairchild

1981 9 to 5 - Dolly Parton
Keep on Loving You - REO Speedwagon
Woman - John Lennon
Guitar Man - Elvis Presley

1989 Lost in Your Eyes - Debbie Gibson
The Living Years - Mike & The Mechanics
Roni - Bobby Brown
From a Jack to a King - Ricky Van Shelton


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

Penny
03-18-2007, 12:35 AM
Really enjoying this thread..........thanks so much for posting it Shadow!!!! :)

ShadowThomas
03-18-2007, 11:45 PM
Monday, March 19, 2007
SWALLOW DAY. :D

This is St. Joseph’s Day, the day that those little birds known as swallows traditionally return to the Mission San Juan Capistrano in California. Every March 19th since 1776 (with very few exceptions), the birds come back to usher in spring in this Southern California seaside town.

While their return is an annual tourist attraction, some in the community have gotten a bit fed up with the mess left behind when the birds migrate in the fall (October 23rd, St. John’s Day). It is costing the quaint town of San Juan Capistrano, in Orange County, California, a lot of money to clean up historic, old buildings where the swallows return to roost year after year.

Events
March 19


1831 - The first bank robbery in America was reported. The City Bank of New York City lost $245,000 in the heist.

1928 - Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll left WGN radio in Chicago to head across town to WMAQ radio. They weren’t able to take their previously popular radio show names with them due to contract limitations. So Sam and Henry were no more. However, Gosden and Correll came up with a new name for the show that became even more popular than the first. A year later it was the national hit: Amos and Andy.

1941 - Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded one of their biggest musical successes. It became one of Decca Records’ all-time greats. Green Eyes featured vocalists Helen O’Connell and Bob Eberly.

1948 - The quickest main event in the history of Madison Square Garden in New York City happened on this day. A crowd of spectators watched in amazement as Lee Savold knocked out Gino Buonvino in 54 seconds of the first round of their prize fight.

1949 - The American Museum of Atomic Energy opened in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

1951 - The Caine Mutiny, a novel by Herman Wouk, was published for the first time. Wouk won a Pulitzer for the novel. He followed it with several more successes: Marjorie Morningstar, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance.

1953 - The Academy Awards celebrated their silver anniversary -- and came to television. NBC paid $100,000 for the rights to broadcast the event on both radio and TV. Hollywood’s best turned out to hand out the Oscar statuettes for the movies of 1952. The party was held at the RKO Pantages Theater, Los Angeles, with Bob Hope hosting. A dual celebration was staged in New York City, where Conrad Nagel was host. The Best Picture award went to Cecil B. DeMille’s The Greatest Show on Earth. Best Director was the legendary John Ford for The Quiet Man. The rest of the best: Actor: Gary Cooper for High Noon; Supporting Actor: Anthony Quinn for Viva Zapata!; Actress: Shirley Booth for Come Back, Little Sheba; Supporting Actress: Gloria Grahame for The Bad and the Beautiful; Art Direction-Set Decoration/Color: Paul Sheriff, Marcel Vertès for Moulin Rouge; Music/Song: Dimitri Tiomkin (music), Ned Washington (lyrics) for the song, High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin’), from High Noon.

1954 - Viewers saw the first televised prize fight shown in living color as Joey Giardello knocked out Willie Troy in round seven of a scheduled 10-round bout at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

1954 - The first rocket-driven sled that ran at incredible speeds on rails was tested in Alamogordo, NM. Scientists were heard to exclaim, “And we didn’t even need snow!”

1968 - Dean Martin received a gold record for the album, Houston. Martin charted 17 hits on the pop music charts in the 1950s and 1960s. Houston was his 12th.

1977 - The staff of WJM-TV had a going-away party, as the last episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show was broadcast. Everyone was fired except the inept Ted Baxter. The show had been a popular hit for seven years. Syndication continues to keep Mary, Lou, Murray, Ted, Rhoda and the rest of the crew going with what was called “the best television of the 1970s.”

1985 - IBM announced that it was planning to stop making the PCjr consumer-oriented computer. The machine had been expected to dominate the home computer market but didn’t quite live up to those expectations. In the 16 months that the PCjr was on the market, only 240,000 units were sold.

Birthdays
March 19


1589 - William Bradford
governor: Plymouth Colony; sailed on the Mayflower; died May 19, 1657

1813 - David Livingstone
missionary, explorer: the Livingstone of “Dr. Livingstone, I presume,” spoken by Henry M. Stanley who found Livingstone in Africa after a two year search; died May 1, 1873

1847 - Albert Pinkham Ryder
artist: The Race Track, Toilers of the Sea, Siefried and the Rhine Maidens; known for his layered paintings of the sea; died Mar 28, 1917

1848 - Wyatt Earp
frontiersman, lawman, gunfighter: gunfight at O.K. Corral; died Jan 13, 1929

1860 - William Jennings Bryan
politician: member of U.S. Congress, Democratic U.S. presidential nominee [1896]; the ‘silver-tongued orator’: Scopes trial; died July 26, 1925

1864 - Charles Marion Russell
artist: known for his paintings of the American cowboy; died Oct 24, 1926

1881 - Edith Nourse Rogers
created Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps [1942]; member of U.S. House of Representatives [reelected 17 times: served from June 25, 1925 until her death on Sep 10, 1960]

1891 - Earl Warren
14th Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court [1953-1969]; died July 9, 1974

1892 - James (Alward) Van Fleet
4-star U.S. Army General [WWI, WWII, Korean War]; consulted Defense Dept.; received Distinguished Service Cross; died Sep 23, 1992 [6 months after his 100th birthday]

1894 - (Jackie) ‘Moms’ Mabley (Loretta Mary Aiken)
comedienne: Abraham, Martin & John; films: Boarding House Blues, Emperor Jones, Amazing Grace, Killer Diller; died May 23, 1975

1904 - John Sirica
U.S. federal judge: presided over Watergate trials and hearings; died Aug 14, 1992

1915 - Patricia Morison (Eileen Patricia Augusta Fraser Morison)
musician: bass; singer; actress: The Magnificent Fraud, The Roundup, One Night in Lisbon, The Song of Bernadette, Lady on a Train, Song of the Thin Man, Tarzan and the Huntress

1916 - Irving Wallace
novelist and biographer: The Fan Club, The Word, The Man; co-author with David Wallechinsky: The People’s Almanac; died June 29, 1990

1920 - Tige Andrews (Tiger Androwaous)
actor: The Detectives, The Mod Squad

1927 - Richie (Don Richard) ‘Whitey’ Ashburn
Baseball Hall of Famer: Philadelphia Phillies [all-star; 1948, 1951, 1953, 1958/World Series: 1950/batting championship: 1955, 1958], Chicago Cubs, NY Mets [all-star: 1962]; batted .308 lifetime with nine .300 seasons and 2,574 hits in 2,189 games; broadcaster for three decades for the Phillies; died Sep 9, 1997

1928 - Patrick McGoohan
actor: Secret Agent, Braveheart, Escape from Alcatraz, The Silver Streak, Ice Station Zebra, I Am a Camera; actor, director: The Prisoner

1930 - Ornette Coleman
musician: saxophone, trumpet, violin, composer: LPs: Something Else!!!, Tomorrow is the Question!, The Shape of Jazz to Come, Change the Century, Free Jazz, Ornette on Tenor, Town Hall, Chappaqua Suite, Ornette Coleman in Europe Vols. 1 & 2, At the Golden Circle, Stockholm, Who’s Crazy, The Empty Foxhole, Forms and Sounds: The Music of Ornette Coleman, New York is Now!, Ornette at 12, Crisis, Friends and Neighbors, Science Fiction, Broken Shadows, Skies of America, The Caravan of Dreams

1930 - Bill Henderson
jazz singer: LPs: And His Special Friends, Live at the Times, Bill Henderson with The Oscar Peterson Trio, Something’s Gotta Give

1932 - Gay Brewer Jr.
golf: champion: Masters [1967]; member of Senior Tour since 1982

1933 - Phyllis Newman
actress: Coming of Age, That was the Week That Was, Picnic, A Secret Space

1933 - Phillip Roth
writer: Goodbye, Columbus, A.P.E.X., Ghostwriter, The Great American Novel, Portnoy’s Complaint

1933 - Renée Taylor
Emmy Award-winning writer: Acts of Love - and Other Comedies [1973]; entertainer: The Jack Paar Show; actress: The Nanny, Daddy Dearest, Mary Hartman Mary Hartman, The Producers, A New Leaf

1935 - Nancy Malone
actress: The Long Hot Summer, Naked City

1936 - Ursula Andress
actress: Dr. No, Casino Royale, Fun in Acapulco, What’s New Pussycat, Clash of the Titans

1937 - Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
singer: Ain’t Got No Home, But I Do [I Don’t Know Why]

1939 - Joe Kapp
football: Minnesota Vikings quarterback: Super Bowl IV; shares NFL Individual Record for touchdowns thrown in a game [7]: Vikings vs. Baltimore Colts [9/28/69]

1944 - Lynda Bird Johnson
daughter of 36th U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson

1946 - Paul Atkinson
musician: guitar: group: The Zombies: She’s Not There, You Make Me Feel Good, Tell Her No, She’s Coming Home, I Want You Back Again, Time of the Season; CBS A&R; died Apr 1, 2004

1946 - Ruth Pointer
singer: group: The Pointer Sisters: Fire, He’s So Shy, Jump [for My Love], Automatic, Neutron Dance, I’m So Excited, Dare Me

1947 - Glenn Close
Tony Award-winning actress: The Real Thing [1984], Death and the Maiden [1992], Sunset Boulevard [1995]; Emmy Award: Serving in Silence: The Margarethe Cammermeyer Story [1995]; Fatal Attraction, The Big Chill, 101 Dalmations

1952 - Chris Brubeck
composer, musician: trombone; Dave Brubeck’s son

1955 - Derek Longmuir
musician: drums: group: The Bay City Rollers: Keep On Dancing, Remember [Sha-La-La], Bye Bye Baby, Give Me a Little Love, Saturday Night

1955 - (Walter) Bruce Willis
Emmy Award-winning actor: Moonlighting [1987]; Die Hard series, Pulp Fiction, Hudson Hawk, The Last Boy Scout, Billy Bathgate, In Country, Last Man Standing, The Fifth Element, Armageddon, The Sixth Sense

1959 - Terry Hall
singer: group: The Specials: Gangsters, A Message to You Rudy, Too Much Too Young, Ghost Town; Fun Boy Three: It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way That You Do It, Really Saying Something, Tunnel of Love, Our Lips are Sealed.

Chart Toppers
March 19

1950 I Said My Pajamas - Tony Martin & Fran Warren
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Chatanoogie Shoe Shine Boy - Red Foley

1958 Don’t/I Beg of You - Elvis Presley
Sweet Little Sixteen - Chuck Berry
Dinner with Drac (Part 1) - John Zacherle
Ballad of a Teenage Queen - Johnny Cash

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
19th Nervous Breakdown - The Rolling Stones
Nowhere Man - The Beatles
Waitin’ in Your Welfare Line - Buck Owens

1974 Seasons in the Sun - Terry Jacks
Dark Lady - Cher
Sunshine on My Shoulders - John Denver
There Won’t Be Anymore - Charlie Rich

1982 Centerfold - The J. Geils Band
Open Arms - Journey
I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
Blue Moon with Heartache - Roseanne Cash

1990 Escapade - Janet Jackson
Black Velvet - Alannah Myles
Roam - The B-52’s
Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
03-19-2007, 08:57 AM
Thanks Shadow :yourock:

lynn
03-19-2007, 04:44 PM
:notacrook

icedreams
03-19-2007, 05:57 PM
Thanks for posting Shadow :)

ShadowThomas
03-19-2007, 11:29 PM
Tuesday, March 20, 2007
UNCLE TOM’S CABIN DAY. :D

It was on this day in 1852 that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic book was published. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, subtitled Life Among the Lowly became an instant success, selling 300,000 copies in its first year. It has since been translated into twenty languages and performed as a play the world over.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin was even spotlighted in the Broadway musical and film, The King and I. Maybe you remember the haunting chant from the show, “Run Eliza, Run!” Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel remains a must-read for school children -- and a reminder to all of us of an ugly time in the history of the United States.

The antislavery novel and the adapted plays all feature the elderly, kind slave, Uncle Tom; the slave child, Topsy; Little Eva, the daughter of Tom’s owner; Eliza, a young mulatto woman and the cruel, northern-born overseer who beat Tom to death, Simon LeGree.

The book brought much sympathy from around the world toward the American “peculiar institution” of slavery. In fact, Abraham Lincoln told Harriet Beecher Stowe she was “the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war,” referring of course, to the Civil War.

’Til this day, we refer to an employer or any other with slave-driving tendencies as a ‘Simon LeGree’.

Events
March 20th.

1865 - A plan by John Wilkes Booth to abduct President Abraham Lincoln was foiled when Lincoln changed plans and failed to appear at the Soldier’s Home near Washington, DC. Booth would later assassinate the President while Lincoln was attending a performance at Ford’s Theatre in the nation’s capital.

1891 - The first computing scale company was incorporated in Dayton, OH. Look around antique stores and you may find some of the old -- and possibly still working -- Dayton Scales. There were other famous scales, too, that were direct from Ohio, ‘the birthplace of weights and measures’. Remember Toledo Scales for weighing fruit and produce in grocery stores?

1897 - The first five-man basketball team intercollegiate basketball game to use five players per team was held. Yale beat Pennsylvania by a score of 32-10 in New Haven, CT.

1911 - The National Squash Tennis Association was formed in New York City.

1914 - The first international figure skating championship was held in New Haven, CT.

1936 - Benny Goodman and his orchestra recorded Christopher Columbus on Victor Records in, where else, Chicago, IL.

1948 - Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra were featured in the first televised symphonic concert. CBS-TV, with help from its then Philadelphia television station, WCAU-TV 10, carried the program from the Philadelphia Academy of Music, the home of the world-famous orchestra. The concert was televised live, at 5 p.m. Ninety minutes later, NBC-TV carried TV’s second symphonic concert. This one was from Carnegie Hall in New York City. Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra was featured in a presentation of Wagner compositions.

1948 - The 20th Academy Awards saw Darryl F. Zanuck’s Gentleman’s Agreement take the Best Picture prize, the Best Director (Elia Kazan), and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). Other awards passed out at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles for the best of 1947 included Best Actor to Ronald Colman for A Double Life; Best Actress to Loretta Young for Farmer’s Daughter; Best Supporting Actor to Edmund Gwenn for Miracle on 34th Street; and Best Music/Song to Allie Wrubel (music), Ray Gilbert (lyrics) for Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah from Song of the South.

1952 - Actor/comedian Danny Kaye hosted the 24th Annual Academy Awards, held this day at the RKO Pantages Theater in Los Angeles and it was upset night. Humphrey Bogart surprised the ‘experts’ by winning an Academy Award for African Queen. Most thought that Marlon Brando would win Best Actor for A Streetcar Named Desire. The top film was Arthur Freed’s An American in Paris. Critics had already decided that A Place in The Sun or Streetcar would walk away with the coveted Oscar for Best Picture of 1951. How wrong they were! Of course both pictures did win golden statues. Best Director was George Stevens for A Place in the Sun. A Streetcar Named Desire won awards for Karl Malden (Best Supporting Actor), Vivien Leigh (Best Actress) and Kim Hunter (Best Supporting Actress). The Best Music/Song Oscar was presented to Hoagy Carmichael (music), and Johnny Mercer (lyrics) for In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening from Here Comes the Groom.

1967 - Fashion model, Twiggy, arrived in the United States for a one-week stay. She quickly became the most sought-after subject of photographers due to her terrifically skinny-yet-wholesome good looks and the shortest dresses ever seen (to that time).

1969 - Beatle John Lennon married Yoko Ono at the Rock of Gibraltar on this day. Lennon called the location, “quiet, friendly and British.” He was the second Beatle to marry in eight days. Paul McCartney and Linda Eastman were wed a week earlier.

1985 - For the first time in its 99-year history, Avon representatives received something instead of cosmetics -- a salary. Up to that time, the Avon lady used to get paid solely on commissions. That’s why she had to say, “Avon calling!” a lot.

1985 - CBS-TV presented The Romance of Betty Boop. The special starred Desiree Goyette as the ‘Boop-Boop-Be-Doop’ cartoon cutie from the Max Fleisher one-reel films in the 1930s. There were 112 Betty Boop shorts produced. Only two other cartoon characters have surpassed Betty in animation fame. They are: Felix the Cat and (of course) Mickey Mouse. Most people thought Betty Boop was fashioned after the actress, Clara Bow, the ‘it’ girl.

1985 - Libby Riddles won the $50,000 top prize in the 1,135-mile Anchorage-to-Nome dog race. The Iditarod was called Alaska’s ultimate endurance test and this was the first time a woman had won. Libby completed the course in 18 days, twenty minutes and seventeen seconds. Another woman, Susan Butcher, won the next three Iditarod trail-sled dog races. The first race was run in 1973. The annual race commemorates the emergency during a 1925 diphtheria epidemic when medical supplies had to be rushed to Nome by dog sled.

1986 - Fallon Carrington and Jeff Colby were wed on the TV drama, The Colby’s. The Colby’s was an offshoot of Dynasty.

Birthdays
March 20th.

1811 - George Caleb Bingham
artist: County Election, Fur Traders Descending the Missouri, Jolly Flatboat Men, Boatmen on the Missouri; died July 7, 1879

1828 - Henrik Ibsen
Norwegian playwright: Hedda Gabler, Peer Gynt, The Wild Duck, The Pillars of Society, An Enemy of the People; died May 23, 1906

1890 - Lauritz Melchior (Lebrecht Hommel)
opera: ‘The Heroic Tenor’, ‘The Premier Heldentenor of the 20th Century’; died Mar 18, 1973

1904 - B.F. (Burrhus Frederic) Skinner
psychologist: behaviorism: developed the Skinner Box, an experimental, enclosed environment for laboratory animals; died Aug 18, 1990

1906 - Ozzie (Oswald George) Nelson
bandleader, actor: The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; married to actress, Harriet Nelson; parents of David and Ricky; died June 3, 1975

1908 - Dr. Frank Stanton
president: CBS [1946-1971]

1908 - Sir Michael (Scudamore) Redgrave
actor: Goodbye Mr. Chips, Heidi, Importance of Being Earnest, Nicholas and Alexandra; died Mar 21, 1985

1914 - Wendell Corey
actor: The Rainmaker, Sorry Wrong Number, Rear Window, Buckskin, The Astro-Zombies, The Light in the Forest; died Nov 8, 1968

1918 - Marian McPartland (Margaret Marian Turner)
musician: After Hours, Ambiance, Personal Choice, In My Life; founded Halcyon Records; songwriter: There’ll Be other Times, Twilight World; National Public Radio show: Marian McPartand’s Piano Jazz

1920 - Pamela Harriman
politician, U.S. ambassador to France; wife of Averell Harriman; died Feb 5, 1997

1922 - Larry Elgart
musician: lead alto sax, bandleader with brother Les: Hooked On Swing, The Bandstand Boogie

1922 - Ray Goulding
comedian: Bob and Ray; died Mar 24, 1990

1922 - Carl Reiner
writer: The Man with Two Brains; actor: The Dick Van Dyke Show, Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World; director: Fatal Instinct, The Jerk, Oh! God; comedian: Your Show of Shows; Rob Reiner’s dad

1928 - Fred Rogers
TV host: Mr. Rogers Neighborhood; died Feb 27, 2003

1929 - Sonny (Santo) Russo
jazz musician: trombonist: group: Sonny Russo Jazz Ensemble

1931 - Hal Linden (Harold Lipshitz)
actor: Barney Miller, How to Break up a Happy Divorce, Starflight One, A New Life

1933 - George (Lee) Altman
baseball: Chicago Cubs [all-star: 1961, 1962], SL Cardinals, NY Mets

1937 - Jerry Reed (Hubbard)
singer: Amos Moses, When You’re Hot, You’re Hot, She Got the Goldmine, I Got the Shaft; songwriter: U.S. Male, Guitar Man; actor: Gator, Smokey & the Bandit

1943 - Paul Junger Witt
Emmy Award-winning producer: Brian’s Song [1972], The Golden Girls [1985-86, 1986-87]

1945 - Pat Riley
basketball coach: Los Angeles Lakers, New York Knicks: coach with the highest winning percentage in basketball history [.719]

1948 - Bobby Orr
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Boston Bruins [Hart Memorial Trophy winner: 1970, 1971, 1972], Chicago Blackhawks

1948 - Steve Zabel
football: Univ. of Oklahoma [All-American: 1969], Philadelphia Eagles, Baltimore Colts, New England Patriots

1950 - William Hurt
actor: Broadcast News, The Accidental Tourist, Altered States, The Big Chill, Trial by Jury, Children of a Lesser God

1950 - Carl Palmer
musician: drums: groups: Emerson, Lake & Palmer: Lucky Man, From the Beginning; Asia: Heat of the Moment, Only Time Will Tell

1951 - Derrek Dickey
basketball: Golden State Warriors; TV color analyst: Chicago Bulls, Sacramento Kings; died June 25, 2002

1957 - Spike Lee
director: She’s Gotta Have It, Do the Right Thing, Mo’ Better Blues, Jungle Fever, Malcolm X, Crooklyn, Clockers

1957 - Theresa Russell
actress: The Spy Within, Straight Time, Black Widow, The Last Tycoon

1958 - Holly Hunter
Academy Award-winning actress: The Piano [1993]; Broadcast News, The Firm, Raising Arizona

1961 - John Clark Gable
actor: Bad Jim, A Burning Passion: The Margaret Mitchell Story, Clark Gable: Tall, Dark and Handsome; son of actor Clark Gable

1961 - Slim Jim Phantom (Jim McDonell)
musician: drums: group: The Stray Cats: Runaway Boys, Stray Cat Strut, Rock This Town.

Chart Toppers
March 20th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Be My Love - Mario Lanza
My Heart Cries for You - Guy Mitchell
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Venus - Frankie Avalon
Charlie Brown - The Coasters
Alvin’s Harmonica - David Seville & The Chipmunks
Don’t Take Your Guns to Town - Johnny Cash

1967 Penny Lane - The Beatles
Happy Together - The Turtles
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Mamas & The Papas
The Fugitive - Merle Haggard

1975 Black Water - The Doobie Brothers
My Eyes Adored You - Frankie Valli
Lady Marmalade - LaBelle
Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Shame on the Moon - Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me - Culture Club
I Wouldn’t Change You If I Could - Ricky Skaggs

1991 Someday - Mariah Carey
One More Try - Timmy -T-
Show Me the Way - Styx
I’d Love You All Over Again - Alan Jackson


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-21-2007, 12:19 AM
Wednesday, March 21, 2007
GOD BLESS AMERICA DAY.

God Bless America, written by Irving Berlin back in 1918 as a tribute by a successful immigrant to his adopted country, was recorded by Kate Smith for Victor Records on this day in 1939.

Ms. Smith first introduced the song on her Thursday, November 10, 1938 radio show (aired live the day before Armistice Day). God Bless America was a fitting tribute to its composer, who gave all royalties from the very popular and emotional song to the Boy Scouts. The song became Kate Smith’s second signature after When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain; and the second national anthem of the United States of America.

On several occasions, it has even been suggested that the U.S. Congress enact a bill changing the national anthem to God Bless America.

Events
March 21st.


1826 - The Rensselaer School in Troy, New York was incorporated. The school, known today as Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, became the first engineering college in the United States. Remember this when crossing over a bridge today...

1868 - The first club for professional women was formed in New York City by writer, Jennie June Croly. The club was called Sorosos.

1925 - The voice of Lowell Thomas was first heard on radio. Thomas was heard talking about “Man’s first flight around the world,” on KDKA in Pittsburgh, PA.

1941 - Singer Paula Kelly joined Glenn Miller’s band. Her husband, also a part of the Miller organization, was one of the four singing Modernaires.

1946 - The Los Angeles Rams signed Kenny Washington, the first black player to join a National Football League team since 1933.

1956 - The 28th Academy Awards were celebrated at the RKO Pantages Theater, Los Angeles, California. Hosting the festivities were comedian/actor/singer/producer Jerry Lewis in Hollywood, plus actress Claudette Colbert and writer/producer/director Joseph L. Mankiewicz in New York City. Marty, produced by Harold Hecht, was a big winner: Best Picture; Best Director (Delbert Mann); Best Actor (Ernest Borgnine); and Best Writing/Screenplay (Paddy Chayefsky). Best Actress was Anna Magnani for The Rose Tattoo; Best Supporting Actor was Jack Lemmon for Mister Roberts; Best Supporting Actress was Jo Van Fleet for East of Eden; and Best Music/Song to Sammy Fain (music), Paul Francis Webster (lyrics) for Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing from Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing. 1955 was a great year for other great movies, too (some Oscar winners, some not): Picnic; Bad Day at Black Rock; The Man with the Golden Arm; Rebel Without a Cause; Pete Kelly’s Blues; The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell; The Seven Little Foys; Blackboard Jungle; To Catch a Thief; and Oklahoma!, The Bridges at Toko-Ri to name a few...

1957 - Shirley Booth made her TV acting debut in The Hostess with the Mostest on Playhouse 90 on CBS.

1961 - The Beatles made their debut in an appearance at Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where they became regulars in a matter of months.

1963 - A year after opening in the Broadway show, I Can Get It for You Wholesale, Elliott Gould and Barbra Streisand tied the matrimonial knot.

1964 - Singer Judy Collins made her debut at Carnegie Hall in New York City and established herself “in the front rank of American balladeers.” She would first hit the Top 40 in 1968 with Both Sides Now, a Joni Mitchell song. Her versions of Amazing Grace and Send In the Clowns also became classics.

1970 - The Beatles established a new record. Let It Be entered the Billboard chart at number six. This was the highest debuting position ever for a record. Let It Be reached number two a week later and made it to the top spot on April 11, overshadowing Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge over Troubled Water.

1985 - Boy George said he would never marry, settle down, or become a father because he was “too eccentric!” He made this revealing statement in, what else? Women’s World magazine!

1994 - Actress/Comedienne Whoopi Goldberg hosted the 66th Annual Academy Awards show at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The film that was created so the world would never forget the Holocaust -- the inhumanity of mankind to other humans -- received the highest honors this evening. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) awarded Schindler’s List, nominated in no less than 12 categories, with seven Oscars: beginning with Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Stephen Zaillian); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Allan Starski, Ewa Braun); Best Cinematography (Janusz Kaminski); Best Film Editing (Michael Kahn); Best Music/Original Score (John Williams); Best Director (Steven Spielberg); and culminating with Best Picture (Producers Steven Spielberg, Gerald R. Molen and Branko Lustig). Schindler’s List was not the only film to receive multiple golden statuettes. Philadelphia (nominated five times) scored two awards, Best Actor (Tom Hanks) and Best Music/Song, Streets of Philadelphia to Bruce Springsteen. The Piano (nominated in eight categories) won both Best Actress (Holly Hunter)and Best Supporting Actress (Anna Paquin), and Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Jane Campion); Jurassic Park received the Best Sound award (Gary Summers, Gary Rydstrom, Shawn Murphy, Ron Judkins), the Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing award (Gary Rydstrom, Richard Hymns), and the Best Effects, Visual Effects award (Dennis Muren, Stan Winston, Phil Tippett, Michael Lantieri). Tommy Lee Jones picked up the Best Supporting Actor award for The Fugitive, a film nominated in seven categories.

1999 - Everything was beautiful at the 71st Annual Academy Awards ceremony at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. There were beautiful people, gowns, and the beautiful words, “The Oscar goes to...” Hosting the festivities which had moved from the traditional Monday night to Sunday evening, was comedienne Whoopi Goldberg, who modeled the beautiful, and sometimes bizarre, costumes from the movies nominated in the Best Costume Design category. (And the Oscar went to Sandy Powell for Shakespeare in Love.) A beautiful lady, Gwyneth Paltrow, emotionally accepted the Best Actress Oscar for her role in Shakespeare in Love. It was a beautiful night for the film with 13 nominations and seven wins including the upset win of Best Picture of the 1998 year; Best Supporting Actress (Dame Judi Dench); Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Marc Norman, Tom Stoppard); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Martin Childs, Jill Quertier); and Best Music/Original Musical or Comedy Score (Stephen Warbeck). This was the first time in nine years that the film that won Best Picture did not win for Best Director. Steven Spielberg was the winning director for Saving Private Ryan (which also won four more of the golden statuettes). It was a beautiful moment when the Best Supporting Actor Oscar was awarded to James Coburn (Affliction), his first Academy Award nomination in over 70 films. But the most beautiful moment/s of the long (Oscar's longest to date) evening was when Sophia Loren said, “and the Oscar goes to Roberto!” (Best Actor: La Vita è bella - Roberto Benigni). In plain English, Life is Beautiful. Roberto Benigni was the first actor in a foreign language film to receive an Oscar. Coincidentally, Ms. Loren had been the first actress to be so honored. Benigni had received an Oscar earlier in the evening for Best Foreign Film (Life is Beautiful) when he pirouetted on top of seat backs, hopping and dancing to the stage. Roberto Benigni truly made the evening bella, bella!

Birthdays
March 21st.

1685 - Johann Sebastian Bach
composer: Gottes Zeit, Toccata and Fugue in d minor, Little Organ Book, Mass in B Minor, Magnificat; died July 28, 1750

1813 - James Jesse Strang
crowned king of the Mormons [1850-1856]; died July 8, 1856

1869 - Florenz Ziegfeld
producer Ziegfeld Follies: annual variety shows famous for the Ziegfeld Girls [1907-1930s]; died July 22, 1932

1882 - Bascom Lamar Lunsford
Appalachian folk song writer: Good Old Mountain Dew; started first folk music festival in 1928: annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival at Asheville, N.C.; responsible for formation of the National Clogging and Hoedown Council; died in 1973

1905 - Phyllis McGinley
Pulitzer prize-winning poet: Times Three: Selected Verses from Three Decades [1961]; The Horse Who Lived Upstairs, Sugar and Spice, Saint-Watching, Sixpence in her Shoe; died Feb 22, 1978

1910 - Julio Gallo
vintner: Ernest & Julio Gallo Winery, Modesto, CA; died May 2, 1993

1918 - Sir Charles Thompson
musician: pianist, organist: w/Lionel Hampton, Coleman Hawkins, Buck Clayton, Jimmy Rushing; composer: Robbins Nest [tribute to DJ Fred Robbins]

1921 - Fonty Flock (Truman Fontello)
auto racer: NASCAR Hall of Famer; died July 15, 1972

1923 - Mort Lindsey
bandleader: The Merv Griffin Show; composer of score: 40 Pounds of Trouble

1925 - Peter Brook
director: Lord of the Flies, King Lear

1930 - James Coco
actor: The Chair, Ensign Pulver, Man of La Mancha; died Feb 25, 1987

1934 - Al Freeman Jr.
actor: A Patch of Blue, Roots: The Next Generation, Hot L Baltimore, Malcolm X, Finian’s Rainbow, Ensign Pulver

1939 - Tommy (Herman Thomas) Davis
baseball: right-handed, hitting outfielder: LA Dodgers [all-star: 1962, 1963/batting titles: 1962, 1963/World Series: 1963, 1966], NY Mets, Chicago White Sox, Houston Astros, Seattle Pilots, Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, KC Royals

1942 - Junior (Lee) Coffey
football: Atlanta Falcons

1944 - Charles Greene
sprinter: Univ. of Nebraska, 1968 Olympics; sprint coach: West Point; director: Special Olympics International; secretary: USA Track & Field’s International Competition Committee

1944 - Manny (Manuel De Jesus Magan) Sanguillen
baseball: catcher: Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1971, 1979/all-star: 1971, 1972, 1975], Oakland Athletics

1945 - Rosie Stone
musician: piano: group: Sly & the Family Stone; Sly’s sister: Everyday People, Dance to the Music

1946 - Timothy Dalton
actor: Centennial, Licence to Kill, The Lion in Winter, Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, Flash Gordon, The Living Daylights, Licence to Kill

1947 - Bill (William Francis) Plummer
baseball: catcher: Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, Seattle Mariners

1950 - Roger Hodgson
musician: guitar: group: Supertramp: Dreamer, Bloody Well Right

1951 - John Hicks
football: lineman: Ohio State U.: Outland Trophy and Lombardi Trophy Winner; offensive rookie of the year: NY Giants [1974]

1951 - Russell Thompkins Jr.
singer: group: The Stylistics: I’m Stone in Love with You

1958 - Gary Oldman
actor: The Scarlet Letter, True Romance, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Sid and Nancy, JFK

1962 - Matthew Broderick
Tony Award-winning actor: The Producers [2001]; films: War Games, The Freshman, Family Business, Ladyhawke, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

1965 - Cynthia Geary
actress: Northern Exposure, 8 Seconds.

Chart Toppers
March 21st.

1944 Mairzy Doats - The Merry Macs
Besame Mucho - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Bob Eberly & Kitty
Kallen
Poinciana - Bing Crosby
They Took the Stars Out of Heaven - Floyd Tillman

1952 Cry - Johnnie Ray
Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Wild One - Bobby Rydell
Puppy Love - Paul Anka
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay - Otis Redding
Love is Blue - Paul Mauriat
Simon Says - 1910 Fruitgum Co.
A World of Our Own - Sonny James

1976 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night) - The Four Seasons
Dream Weaver - Gary Wright
Lonely Night (Angel Face) - Captain & Tennille
Faster Horses (The Cowboy and the Poet) - Tom T. Hall

1984 Jump - Van Halen
Girls Just Want to Have Fun - Cyndi Lauper
Somebody’s Watching Me - Rockwell
Elizabeth - The Statler Brothers


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

icedreams
03-21-2007, 08:03 PM
Keep it coming Shadow :D

lynn
03-21-2007, 08:13 PM
You da man Shadow !!! :D

ShadowThomas
03-21-2007, 11:18 PM
Thursday, March 22, 2007
STANLEY CUP DAY.

In 1894, play-off competition for the coveted hockey award known as Lord Stanley’s Cup began. Montreal and Ottawa played for the first championship honors on this day. Montreal took home the trophy.

The original trophy cost $48.67 and was purchased the previous year by Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley, Lord Stanley of Preston. He then donated it to the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. The inaugural champion was the Montreal Amateur Athletic Association.

From 1894 on, the winner of the Stanley Cup has had to win a series of playoff games first. In 1926, the playoff format took the order that remains in place today. The National Hockey League has been the permanent forum.

The teams with the most Stanley Cup titles since 1927 include the Detroit Red Wings (9) and Toronto Maple Leafs (11), with the Montreal Canadiens outdistancing the rest of the NHL (24 championship trophies). Larry Robinson holds the record for playing in the most Stanley Cup games (203 for Montreal and 24 for the LA Kings).

The Stanley Cup competition remains the oldest in professional sports in North America.

Events
March 22nd.

1630 - The first legislation to prohibit gambling was enacted -- in Boston, Massachusetts.

1911 - Hermann Jadlowker became the first opera singer to perform two major roles in the same day at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.

1948 - The Voice of Firestone was the first commercial radio program to be carried simultaneously on both AM and FM radio stations.

1956 - Sammy Davis, Jr. starred in the play, Mr. Wonderful, in New York City. The critics were unkind, saying that they didn’t care for the production. Audiences, however, gave it ‘thumbs up’ and the show went on to be one of Broadway’s more popular musicals -- catapulting Davis into the limelight. His father had already launched him into the vaudeville spotlight when Sammy was just three years old. By the time he was Mr. Wonderful, Sammy Davis, Jr. had played vaudeville and the nightclub circuit singing and dancing his way to the top over a twenty-eight-year period. He entertained us for sixty-two years!

1956 - Perry Como became the first major TV variety-show host to book a rock and roll act on his program. The ‘Incomparable Mr. C.’ booked Carl Perkins for the show and Perkins sang Blue Suede Shoes.

1962 - The play, I Can Get It For You Wholesale, opened on Broadway. It featured a 19-year-old named Barbra Streisand. She stopped the show at the famed Shubert Theatre in New York City. Streisand starred as Miss Marmelstein. Audiences kept coming back for more of Barbra for 300 performances.

1969 - UCLA defeated Purdue 92-72 to win the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball championship. The Bruins were the first team to win three consecutive championships -- all under legendary head coach John Wooden. UCLA went on to dominate the college basketball title through the 1973 season.

1977 - Comedienne Lily Tomlin made her debut on Broadway as Appearing Nightly opened in New York.

1980 - Pink Floyd started a 4-week run in the #1 slot on the pop charts with their smash, Another Brick in the Wall. When the boys popped open their gold record and threw it on the stereo, they heard Flowers on the Wall by the Statler Brothers. Legend has it that they ordered a pizza and played it over and over for hours (the record, not the pizza).

1981 - U.S. Postage rates rose from 15-cents to 18-cents an ounce.

1981 - RCA put its Selectravision laser disc players on the market. Soon, the product was called “the Edsel of the entertainment field.” The units cost $500 and the videodisks about $15 each. The combination failed to catch the consumer’s fancy.

1985 - Clara Peller, the lady who said, “Where’s the Beef?” in those Wendy’s hamburger ads, said, “Where’s my final paycheck?” She ended her relationship with Dave Thomas and company when she found the beef for a spaghetti sauce company. The hamburger chain said it made her “lose credibility.”

1987 - A 3,100-ton pile of rotting garbage left Islip, New York looking for a landfill willing to take all of its stinking contents. It was later submerged at sea ... we think...

Birthdays
March 22nd.

1887 - Chico (Leonard) Marx
comedian; the Marx Brother who wore the hat: Animal Crackers, A Day at the Races, Duck Soup; died Oct 11, 1961

1912 - Karl Malden (Mladen Sekulovich)
actor: Streets of San Francisco, Streetcar Named Desire, The Sting, How the West was Won, On the Waterfront; spokesperson: American Express commercials

1917 - Virginia Grey
actress: The Rose Tattoo, Bachelor in Paradise; died July 31, 2004

1920 - Ross Martin (Martin Rosenblatt)
actor: The Wild Wild West, Dying Room Only; died July 3, 1981

1920 - Werner Klemperer
Emmy Award-winning actor: Hogan’s Heroes [1967-1968]; Ship of Fools; died Dec 6, 2000

1923 - Marcel Marceau (Mangel)
mime: famous quote from Marceau “!”; he spoke in Silent Movie - the only speaking part in the film

1924 - Bill Wendell (William Joseph Wenzel, Jr.)
announcer: Tonight, Late Night with David Letterman; died Apr 14, 1999

1928 - ‘Easy’ Ed (Edward) Macauley
Basketball Hall of Famer: St. Louis Univ., St. Louis Bombers, Boston Celtics [all-star: 1951-57/1st NBA all-star game: MVP: 1951/NBA championship: 1958], St. Louis Hawks; coach: St. Louis Hawks

1930 - Pat Robertson (Marion Gordon Robinson)
TV evangelist

1930 - Stephen Sondheim
composer: Send in the Clowns, A Little Night Music; scores for West Side Story, Reds, Gypsy, Dick Tracy

1931 - William Shatner
Emmy Award-winning actor: Boston Legal [2004]; Star Trek, Rescue 9-1-1, T.J. Hooker

1933 - May Britt (Maybritt Wilkens)
actress: The Young Lions, The Hunters, Murder, Inc., Haunts

1935 - Gene (Eugene George) Oliver
baseball: SL Cardinals, Milwaukee Braves, Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs

1935 - M. (Michael) Emmet Walsh
actor: Relative Fear, The Mighty Quinn, Serpico, Blood Simple, Raising Arizona, Fletch, Blade Runner, Reds, Ordinary People, East of Eden, Stiletto, Unsub, The Sandy Duncan Show

1937 - Johnny Ferguson
singer: Angela Jones

1940 - Dick (Richard Clark) Ellsworth
baseball: pitcher: Chicago Cubs [all-star: 1964], Philadelphia Phillies, Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, Milwaukee Brewers

1940 - Dave Keon
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Toronto Maple Leafs [Rookie of the Year; 1961/Lady Byng Trophy: 1962, 1963/Stanley Cup playoff MVP: 1967], Hartford Whalers

1941 - Bruno Ganz
actor: The American Friend, Wings of Desire, The Last Days of Chez Nous, Children of Nature

1941 - Bob Leiter
hockey: NHL: Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Penguins, Atlanta Flames

1943 - George Benson
singer: This Masquerade, On Broadway, Give Me the Night; session guitarist: CTI Records

1944 - Jeremy Clyde
singer: group: Chad & Jeremy: Yesterday’s Gone, A Summer Song, Willow Weep for Me, Before & After

1946 - Don Chaney
basketball: Univ. of Houston, LA Lakers, Boston Celtics; coach: Detroit Pistons, Houston Rockets [1991 Coach of the Year]

1947 - Harry Vanda
musician: guitar: group: The Easybeats: She’s So Fine, Wedding Ring, Sad and Lonely and Blue, Woman, Come and See Her, Friday on My Mind, Hello How are You, Good Times

1948 - Randy Hobbs
musician: bass: group: The McCoys: Hang on Sloopy

1948 - Andrew Lloyd Webber
composer: Jesus Christ Superstar, Hair, Cats, Phantom of the Opera

1952 - Bob Costas (Robert Quinlan)
sportscaster: WSYR radio/TV [Syracuse NY], KMOX radio [voice of ABA Spirits of St. Louis MO], CBS Sports, NBC Sports: Contributor: Dateline NBC, Anchor: MSNBC’s InterNight

1955 - Lena Olin
actress: Romeo is Bleeding, Havana, After the Rehearsal

1957 - Stephanie Mills
singer; actress: The Wiz

1959 - Matthew Modine
actor: Fluke, Short Cuts, Married to the Mob, And the Band Played On, Pacific Heights, Full Metal Jacket, Mrs. Soffel, The Hotel New Hampshire, Birdy, Private School.

Chart Toppers
March 22nd.

1945 A Little on the Lonely Side - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Jimmy
Brown)
Accentuate the Positive - Johnny Mercer
My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Pied Pipers
There’s a New Moon Over My Shoulder - Jimmie Davis

1953 Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
Don’t Let the Stars Get in Your Eyes - Perry Como
Doggie in the Window - Patti Page
Kaw-Liga - Hank Williams

1961 Surrender - Elvis Presley
Where the Boys Are - Connie Francis
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Shirelles
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Dizzy - Tommy Roe
Traces - Classics IV featuring Dennis Yost
Indian Giver - 1910 Fruitgum Co.
Only the Lonely - Sonny James

1977 Love Theme from "A Star is Born" (Evergreen) - Barbra Streisand
Fly like an Eagle - Steve Miller
Rich Girl - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Southern Nights - Glen Campbell

1985 Can’t Fight This Feeling - REO Speedwagon
The Heat is On - Glenn Frey
Material Girl - Madonna
Crazy for Your Love - Exile


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
03-22-2007, 10:05 AM
Thanks Shadow ;)

ShadowThomas
03-22-2007, 11:13 PM
Friday, March 23, 2007
MONKEY DAY. :D

An evolution law, enacted this day in the great State of Tennessee in the year 1925, made it a crime for a teacher in any state-supported public school or college to teach any theory that contradicted the Bible’s account of man’s creation. Tennessee’s Governor Austin Peay said, “The very integrity of the Bible in its statement of man’s divine creation is denied by any theory that man descended or has ascended from any lower order of animals.” Opponents planned to challenge the law, denouncing it as a violation of the constitutional principle of separation of church and state.

Within two months, a Dayton, Tennessee high school science teacher, John T. Scopes was indicted, and later convicted, in the famous ‘Monkey Trial’ for teaching his students the theory of evolution; that man descended from a lower order of animals ... or monkeys. Scopes was fined $100. Defense Attorney Clarence Darrow stated that this was “the first case of its kind since we stopped trying people for witchcraft.”

Remember this the next time you think about swinging from a tree ... especially while eating a banana and singing, “Yaba daba daba.”

Events
March 23rd.


1743 - It was the first London performance of Handel’s Messiah, and King King George II was in the audience. In the middle of the Hallelujah Chorus, the King rose to his feet in appreciation of the great piece! The entire audience followed suit out of respect for the King. And so began the custom of standing during the singing of the Hallelujah Chorus.

1794 - Josiah G. Pierson patented a rivet machine. Rivet at home with a hand-held gizmo perfect for pocket or purse that lets you rivet buttons, snaps and other do-dads on clothes. Makes a perfect gift!

1858 - Eleazer A. Gardner of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania received two special awards: 1) For having the courage to stick with the name Eleazer and 2) for patenting the cable street car. Not the cable car that made San Francisco so popular, but the street car that runs on overhead cables in some cities -- like Philadelphia.

1861 - John D. Defrees became the first Superintendent of the United States Government Printing Office. He, however, received no special holiday in his honor. Go figure.

1880 - John Stevens of Neenah, WI patented the device which was called a grain crushing mill. The machine allowed flour production to increase by 70 percent and to sell for $2 more per barrel.

1940 - Truth or Consequences was first heard on radio. The Ralph Edwards-produced program was hosted by Mr. Edwards before he discovered a young announcer named Bob Barker. Barker also was the show’s host on television more than a decade later. The radio show was originally heard on only four CBS stations. Later, NBC picked up the show where it eventually became the most popular of all radio quiz shows.

1950 - Beat the Clock, starring radio’s original Superman, Bud Collyer, premiered on CBS-TV. A lady named Roxanne was Collyer’s assistant from 1950 to 1955. Beverly Bentley was the clock-beater’s assistant from 1955 through the last show on February 16, 1958. It was another one of those Mark Goodsen and Bill Todman productions.

1950 - And the Oscar for Best Actor goes to... Broderick Crawford for his portrayal of corrupt politician Willie Stark in All the King’s Men. Thus we recall the 22nd Academy Awards, held at the RKO Pantages Theater in Los Angeles. The host for the evening, actor Paul Douglas, helped Hollywood pat itself on the back, as they celebrated the films of 1949. All the King’s Men also won the Academy Award for Best Picture (Robert Rossen, producer) and the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress (Mercedes McCambridge). Other winners this night included Best Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz for Letter to Three Wives, Best Actress: Olivia de Havilland for The Heiress and Best Supporting Actor: Dean Jagger for Twelve O’Clock High. On a musical note, the Best Music/Song Oscar was awarded to Frank Loesser for Baby, It’s Cold Outside from Neptune’s Daughter. And who did Broderick Crawford beat out for the Best Actor prize? Kirk Douglas, Richard Todd, John Wayne and Gregory Peck.

1963 - An indoor pole vault record was set by John Pennel in Memphis, TN. He cleared 16 feet, 3 inches.

1965 - Astronaut John Young became the first man to eat a corned beef sandwich in outer space. When it comes to events of progress, we will certainly add this to the record book, now won’t we? ...along with that golf club stunt of Alan Shepard’s from the surface of the moon years later. Young smuggled the sandwich on board in order to supplement the astronauts’ meals of dehydrated foods, including powdered fruit juice (Tang).

1972 - New York Yankees baseball officials announced plans to keep the Yankees in the nation’s largest city. Plans were also revealed concerning a major renovation of Yankee Stadium. While work was underway at ‘The House that Ruth Built’, the Bronx Bombers shared tenancy with the cross-town New York Mets in Flushing, New York at Shea Stadium. New Yorkers also got one other bonus from the announced plans: George Steinbrenner.

1973 - Concentration, the longest-running game show in television history, starring Hugh Downs, left the air after 15 years on NBC. A syndicated version without Downs aired shortly thereafter, but did not survive for long.

1974 - Cher reached the top of the music charts as Dark Lady reached the #1 spot for a one-week stay. Other artists who shared the pop music spotlight during that time included: Terry Jacks, John Denver, Blue Swede, Elton John and MFSB.

1981 - CBS Television announced plans to reduce Captain Kangaroo to a 30-minute show each weekday morning. The reason, according to network brass, was to allow more time for its morning news programming. This move proved to be a huge mistake. The CBS Morning News was the weakest morning news program on the air, against NBC’s Today and ABC’s Good Morning America. The show was a ratings disaster that went through many changes and complete makeovers in an effort to find an audience. Secret plans to use Mr. Moose, Bunny Rabbit, Grandfather Clock and Mr. Green Jeans on the Morning News did not, however, become reality -- although former Miss America, Phyllis George, was a reality on the program.

1985 - Singer Billy Joel married supermodel Christie Brinkley in private ceremonies held in New York City. (They were divorced Aug 25, 1994.)

1985 - We Are the World, by USA for Africa, a group of 46 pop stars, entered the music charts for the first time at number 21.

1986 - Martina Navratilova defeated Hana Mandlikova to win the Virginia Slims Championship. It was the first women’s tournament to go four sets since 1901.

1987 - Baltimore Orioles’ manager, Cal Ripken, Sr., cut one of the birds from the nest. His own son, Cal Ripken, Jr., was sent down to the minors for a short stay before returning to capture the ‘Most Consecutive Games Played’ honor in 1995.

1998 - The movie, Titanic, won a record-tying 11 Oscars at the 70th Annual Academy Awards (tying the number of awards won by Ben-Hur in 1959). Comedian/actor Billy Crystal kept the crowd at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and the millions watching on TV, in stitches as Titanic (James Cameron, Jon Landau, producers) won (big breath now): Best Picture; Best Director (James Cameron); Best Cinematography (Russell Carpenter); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Peter Lamont [art director], Michael Ford [set decorator]); Best Costume Design (Deborah Lynn Scott); Best Sound (Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson, Gary Summers, Mark Ulano); Best Film Editing (Conrad Buff IV, James Cameron, Richard A. Harris); Best Effects/Sound Effects Editing (Tom Bellfort, Christopher Boyes); Best Effects/Visual Effects (Robert Legato, Mark A. Lasoff, Thomas L. Fisher, Michael Kanfer); Best Music/Original Dramatic Score (James Horner); and Best Music/Song (James Horner (music) and Will Jennings (lyrics) for My Heart Will Go On, performed by Céline Dion). Not a bad return for a measly investment of $200 million. And yes, Virginia, there were other winners: Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt took top acting honors as the misanthropic writer and the waitress who softens his heart in As Good as it Gets. The Best Supporting Actor Oscar went to Robin Williams for Good Will Hunting and Best Supporting Actress was Kim Basinger for her L.A. Confidential part (Lynn Bracken: “Merry Christmas to you, officer.”) We’re running a little late, so good night all...

Birthdays
March 23rd.

1823 - Schuyler Colfax
17th U.S. Vice President [1869-1873] under Ulysses S. Grant; died Jan 13, 1885

1900 - Erich Fromm
psychoanalyst: The Method and Function of an Analytic Social Psychology, Psychoanalytic Characterology and Its Relevance for Social Psychology; died Mar 18, 1980

1904 - Joan Crawford (Lucille Fay LeSueur)
Academy Award-winning actress: Mildred Pierce [1945]; A Woman’s Face, Night Gallery, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane, Above Suspicion, Grand Hotel; died May 10, 1977

1910 - Akira Kurosawa
film director: Rashomon, The Seven Samurai, Ran, Rhapsody in August, The Idiot, The Bad Sleep Well; died Sep 6, 1998

1912 - Wernher von Braun
scientist: developer of WWII German V-2 rocket, head of U.S. Army missile team; technological leader of American space program; died June 16, 1977

1917 - Johnny Guarnieri
musician: piano: played with Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw; played at the Tail O’ The **** in LA for a decade; died Jan 7, 1985

1928 - Jim (James Robert) Lemon
baseball: Cleveland Indians, Washington Nationals, Washington Senators [all-star: 1960], Minnesota Twins, Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Phillies

1929 - Roger Bannister
British track star: broke the 4-minute mile [3:59.4 on May 6, 1954]; physician

1931 - ‘Rocky’ Warren Godfrey
hockey: NHL: Boston Bruins, Detroit Red Wings

1933 - Monique van Vooren
actress: Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein, Ash Wednesday, Sugar Cookies

1937 - Craig Breedlove
rocket car speedster: the first person to travel more than 400mph, more than 500mph and more than 600 mph on land

1940 - Ted Green
hockey: NHL: Boston Bruins

1943 - Lee (Andrew) May
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [all-star: 1969, 1971/World Series: 1970], Houston Astros [all-star: 1972], Baltimore Orioles [World Series: 1979], KC Royals

1944 - George (Charles) ‘Boomer’ Scott
baseball: Boston Red Sox [all-star: 1966, 1977/World Series: 1967], Milwaukee Brewers [all-star: 1975], KC Royals, NY Yankees

1946 - Vic Washington
football: SF 49ers, Houston Oilers, Buffalo Bills

1949 - Ric Ocasek (Richard Otcasek)
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Cars: My Best Friend’s Girl, Just What I Needed, Let’s Go, You Might Think, Magic, Drive, Tonight She Comes; solo: LP: Beatitude

1951 - Ron Jaworski
football: Philadelphia Eagles quarterback: Super Bowl XV

1953 - Chaka Khan (Yvette Marie Stevens)
singer: Tell Me Something Good [with Rufus], You Got the Love; solo: I Feel for You

1955 - Moses Malone
Basketball Hall of Famer: Buffalo Braves, Houston Rockets [single-game playoff record for most offensive rebounds [15: April 21, 1977 vs. Washington], Philadelphia 76ers, Washington Bullets, Atlanta Hawks, Milwaukee Bucks, Washington Bullets, Atlanta Hawks, San Antonio Spurs; NBA MVP: 1979, 1982, 1983; records: most consecutive games without a disqualification [1,212], most free throws made [8,531], most offensive rebounds [6,731]

1957 - Teresa Ganzel
actress: The Dave Thomas Comedy Hour, The Duck Factory, Roxie, Teachers Only

1957 - Amanda Plummer
Tony Award-winning actress [1982]: Agnes of God; The Fisher King, Joe Versus the Volcano, The World According to Garp, Pulp Fiction; Christopher Plummer’s daughter

1966 - Marti Pellow (Mark McLoughlin)
singer: group: Wet, Wet, Wet: Goodnight Girl<

1990 - Princess Eugenie (Eugenie Victoria Helena Windsor)
British royalty: daughter of Prince Andrew and the Duchess of York [Sarah Ferguson]

Chart Toppers
March 23rd.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Personality - Johnny Mercer
Day by Day - Frank Sinatra
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Make Love to Me! - Jo Stafford
Cross Over the Bridge - Patti Page
Wanted - Perry Como
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Hey! Baby - Bruce Channel
Midnight in Moscow - Kenny Ball & His Jazzmen
Don’t Break the Heart that Loves You - Connie Francis
That’s My Pa - Sheb Wooley

1970 Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel
The Rapper - The Jaggerz
Give Me Just a Little More Time - Chairmen of the Board
The Fightin’ Side of Me - Merle Haggard

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys - Waylon &
Willie

1986 These Dreams - Heart
Secret Lovers - Atlantic Starr
Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
What’s a Memory like You (Doing in a Love like This) - John Schneider


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
03-23-2007, 08:01 PM
Thanks Shadow.... ;)

ShadowThomas
03-24-2007, 10:06 AM
Saturday, March 24, 2007
TREASURE HUNT DAY.

“To be or not to be ... the winner of an Oscar”. That was the question as the Academy Awards were passed out for the 21st time on this night in 1949.

Actor/producer/director Robert Montgomery hosted the ceremony held at the AMPAS Theater in Los Angeles. Hamlet, produced by Lawrence Olivier for J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films, won Best Picture of 1948. Olivier also was pronounced Best Actor for his portrayal of Hamlet.

The real star of the evening, however, was the Hollywood flick, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, the story of a trio of prospectors in their search for gold in them thar hills. The search finally led them to gold in the shape of Oscar ... three Oscars, to be exact, and a nomination for Best Picture.

And, as far as we know, it was the first, and remains the only time a father and son both won Academy Awards on the same night. They were presented to Walter and John Huston for their stunning work in the 1948 film. Walter was awarded an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor and his son, John, received honors for Best Director and for Best Screenplay (based on a B. Traven story).

Other winners of the treasured golden statuette on this spring night were: Jane Wyman (the former Mrs. Ronald Reagan) for Best Actress (film: Johnny Belinda); Claire Trevor for Best Supporting Actress (film: Key Largo); Jay Livingston and Ray Evans for Best Music/Song (Buttons and Bows from the Bob Hope/Jane Russell flick, The Paleface). And although Olivier won the Best Actor Oscar, Humphrey Bogart was superb as the paranoid, and ultimately, homicidal Fred C. Dobbs in Sierra Madre.

Events
March 24th.

1792 - Benjamin West became the first American artist to be selected president of the Royal Academy of London.

1882 - Professor Robert Koch announced the discovery of the tuberculosis germ -- in Berlin, Germany.

1932 - Belle Baker hosted a radio variety show from a moving train ... a first for radio broadcasting. The program originated from a Baltimore and Ohio train that chugged its way around the New York area. The broadcast was heard on WABC in New York City.

1935 - After a year as a local show from New York City, Major Bowes’ Original Amateur Hour was heard on the entire NBC radio network. The show stayed on the air for 17 years. Later, Ted Mack took over for Bowes and made the move from radio to television.

1941 - Glenn Miller began work on his first motion picture for 20th Century Fox. The film was Sun Valley Serenade.

1955 - The Tennessee Williams play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, opened on Broadway. The hit ran for 694 shows and won the Critics’ Circle Award as the Best American Play. The movie version was a big hit as well and featured Burl Ives, Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor in starring roles. Paul, Liz and the movie received Oscar nominations.

1958 - Elvis Presley reported to local draft board 86 in Memphis, TN. He became US 53310761. Oddly, since Elvis was now ‘government property’ serving his time in the Army, Uncle Sam stood to lose an estimated $500,000 in lost taxes each year that Private Presley was in the Army.

1960 - A U.S. appeals court ruled that the novel, Lady Chatterly’s Lover, was not obscene and could be sent through the mail. Try it and see...

1973 - Professional track debuted with Kip Keino defeating Jim Ryun in the mile run at the International Track Association meet held in Los Angeles, CA.

1980 - Capitol Records released some rare Beatles tracks. Included in the album were stereo versions of Penny Lane and She Loves You, sung by the group in German, under the title, Sie Liebt Dich. Also included was a German version of I Want to Hold Your Hand or, in the Teutonic tongue, Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand.

1985 - The Golden Raspberry Awards were presented to parody the Oscar Awards. The movie, Bolero, won the big award, for John and Bo (I’m a 10!) Derek; winning honors for worst director and worst actress, respectively.

1985 - Actress Jacqueline Bisset made her television debut in Forbidden, a Home Box Office (HBO) presentation. Her second TV role came just two nights later in the CBS-TV adaptation of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina.

1986 - The 58th Academy Awards show was held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. It took three hosts (Alan Alda, Jane Fonda and Robin Williams) to handle the MC duties this time. The Best Picture was Out of Africa (Sydney Pollack, producer). It also won Best Director (Sydney Pollack); Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Kurt Luedtke); Best Cinematography (David Watkin); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Stephen B. Grimes, Josie MacAvin); Best Sound (Chris Jenkins, Gary Alexander, Larry Stensvold, Peter Handford); and Best Music/Original Score (John Barry). But Out of Africa didn’t win everything. Other Oscars went to Kiss of the Spider Woman (Best Actor: William Hurt); The Trip to Bountiful (Best Actress: Geraldine Page); Cocoon (Best Supporting Actor: Don Ameche - his first Oscar) and Prizzi’s Honor (Best Supporting Actress: Anjelica Huston). The award for Best Music/Song was given to Lionel Richie for Say You, Say Me from White Nights. Other memorable movies in 1985 (some Oscar winners, some not): The Color Purple (11 nominations - no Oscars), Back to the Future, Ladyhawke, Rambo: First Blood Part II, Agnes of God, Silverado and Witness, to name just a few...

1989 - At four minutes past midnight, the Exxon Valdez, a 987-foot supertanker loaded with 1,264,155 barrels of North Slope crude oil, ran aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska. 11.2 million gallons of oil spilled into the sea, mucking up nearly five hundred miles of shoreline. Thousands of workers spent three years cleaning things up. The costs exceeded $2.1 billion. It is estimated that some 300,000 birds were killed. Some common forms of algae were reduced by half. 2,650 sea otters in Prince William Sound were killed. The spill was even damaging to south central Alaska’s fisheries, with the local population suffering economic, social and psychological consequences that lasted for years. Exxon wound up paying well over a billion dollars in civil settlements and fines.

1997 - It was time to party, party, party at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) awarded prizes for the best of the movie biz in 1996. Comedian/actor Billy Crystal hosted this 69th awards show. Let’s rip into the envelopes and get on with it. Best Picture: The English Patient (Saul Zaentz, producer); Best Director: Anthony Minghella for The English Patient; Best Actor: Geoffrey Rush for Shine; Best Actress: Frances McDormand for Fargo; Best Supporting Actor: Cuba Gooding, Jr. for Jerry Maguire; Best Supporting Actress: Juliette Binoche for The English Patient; Best Music, Song: Andrew Lloyd Webber (music), Tim Rice (lyrics) for You Must Love Me from Evita. And the Oscar goes to ... "The English Patient", "The English Patient", "The English Patient" ... for a total of 9 Oscars.

Birthdays
March 24th.


1797 - Antonio Rosmini-Serbati
philosopher: founded Institute of Charity aka the Rosminians; died July 1, 1855

1834 - William Morris
poet, artist, socialist reformer; died Oct 3, 1896

1834 - John Wesley Powell
geologist, explorer: Director of U.S. Geological Survey [1881-1894]; died Sep 23, 1902

1855 - Andrew William Mellon
industrialist; founder: Mellon Bank; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury [1921-1932]; U.S. ambassador to Great Britain, [1932-1933]; died Aug 26, 1937

1874 - Harry Houdini
magician: the great Houdini, escape artist; died Oct 31, 1926

1887 - Fatty (Roscoe Conkling) Arbuckle
actor:The Lizzies of Mack Sennett Mabel and Fatty Keystone Comedies with Charlie Chaplin; died June 29, 1933

1899 - Capt. Dorothy Stratton
organized SPARS [Semper Paratus - Always Ready women’s branch of U.S. Coast Guard]; national executive director of Girl Scouts of America

1900 - June (Algeria Junius) Clark
musician: trumpet; died Feb 23, 1963

1910 - Richard (Nicholas Peter) Conte
actor: I’ll Cry Tomorrow, The Godfather, Hotel, A Walk in the Sun, They Came to Cordura; died Apr 15, 1975

1919 - Lawrence Ferlinghetti
author: Coney Island of the Mind

1920 - Gene Nelson (Eugene Leander Berg)
actor, dancer: Lullaby of Broadway, Oklahoma, Tea for Two, The West Point Story, The Atomic Man; died Sep 16, 1996

1922 - Dave Appell
arranger for big bands: Benny Carter, Earl ‘Fatha’ Hines; TV music director: The Ernie Kovacks Show; record producer: The Twist, Let's Twist Again, Bristol Stomp, South Street, In the Midnight Hour [w/Hank Medress]; singer, songwriter, musician: group: Dave Appell and the Applejacks

1924 - Norman Fell (Feld)
actor: Three’s Company, The Graduate, Pork Chop Hill; died Dec 14, 1998

1928 - Vanessa Brown (Smylla Brind)
actress: The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Three Husbands, The Fighter, Witch Who Came from the Sea; died May 21, 1999

1928 - Byron Janis (Yanks)
pianist: NBC Symphony Orchestra; well-known piano performance on Hugo Winterhalter’s Rhapsody in Blue recording

1930 - (Terence Steven) Steve McQueen
actor: The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Papillon, Towering Inferno, The Sand Pebbles, Love with the Proper Stranger, Hell is for Heroes, Bullitt, The Hunter, Le Mans; died Nov 7, 1980

1934 - William Smith
biker, cowboy, actor: Eye of the Tiger, L.A. Vice, Maniac Cop, East L.A. Warriors, Emperor of the Bronx, Angels Die Hard, Platoon Leader

1937 - Bob (John Robert) Tillman
baseball: catcher: Boston Red Sox, NY Yankees, Atlanta Braves; died June 23, 2000

1940 - Bob Mackie
fashion and costume designer: 6 Emmy Awards, 3 Academy Award nominations; client list includes: Cher, Carol Burnett, Diahann Carroll, Bernadette Peters, Madonna, Carol Channing and RuPaul, The Carol Burnett Show [entire 11-year TV run]

1942 - Jesus (Maria Rojas) Alou
baseball: SF Giants, Houston Astros, Oakland Athletics (World Series: 1973, 1974), NY Mets

1946 - Lee Oskar (Oskar Hansen)
musician: harmonica: group: War

1951 - Pat Bradley
golf champion: U.S. Open [1981], Nabisco Dinah Shore [1986], DuMaurier Classic [1980, 1985, 1986], LPGA [1986]

1951 - Dougie Thomson
musician: bass: group: Supertramp: Dreamer, Bloody Well Right

1951 - Earl Williams
basketball: Boston Celtics

1954 - Robert Carradine
actor: Revenge of the Nerds series, Body Bags, Double-Crossed, The Long Riders, Coming Home, Massacre at Central High, The Cowboys; son of actor, John Carradine; brother of actors David and Keith Carradine

1954 - Donna Pescow
actress: Policewoman Centerfold, Saturday Night Fever, Glory Years, Angie

1970 - Lara Flynn Boyle
actress: The Practice, Twin Peaks, Threesome, Wayne’s World, Dead Poets Society, Red Rock West, Poltergeist 3, Huff.

Chart Toppers
March 24th.

1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Managua, Nicaragua - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Stuart Wade)
Oh, But I Do - Margaret Whiting
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Sincerely - McGuire Sisters
Darling Je Vous Aime Beaucoup - Nat ‘King’ Cole
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 Our Day Will Come - Ruby & The Romantics
The End of the World - Skeeter Davis
He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Me and Bobby McGee - Janis Joplin
She’s a Lady - Tom Jones
Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me) - The Temptations
I’d Rather Love You - Charley Pride

1979 Tragedy - Bee Gees
What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Heaven Knows - Donna Summer with Brooklyn Dreams
I Just Fall in Love Again - Anne Murray

1987 Lean on Me - Club Nouveau
Let’s Wait Awhile - Janet Jackson
Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
I’d Still Be Loving You - Restless Heart


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-24-2007, 02:40 PM
For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. Also a big thank you to, Admin. Steve for letting me have this thread as a, Sticky. :)

Enjoy everyone. :)

ShadowThomas
03-25-2007, 12:40 AM
84th day of 2007 - 281 remaining.

Sunday, March 25, 2007
HUMBLE HOWARD DAY.

Howard Cosell (Cohen) was born on this day in 1920. Cosell came to be the most liked -- and the most disliked -- sports journalist across America.

Cosell agreed when others described him as arrogant, pompous, obnoxious, vain, cruel, verbose, a show-off. And still others said he forgot to include “irritating, generous, funny, paranoid, charming, egomaniacal and insecure.”

A New York attorney, Cosell ventured into the world of network sports journalism through his association with WABC radio and TV in New York in the 1950’s and early 1960s. He was featured as the boxing announcer for ABC Sports and, under Roone Arledge, filled various sports positions on Wide World of Sports -- from horse racing to Olympic competition. Cosell would, in a stentorian and often difficult to understand syntax, make use of his abundant vocabulary that contained big, big words that sent sports fans scurrying for their dictionaries.

Always outspoken and frequently controversial, Cosell would Tell It like It Is, the title of one of his best selling books on the subject of sports and broadcasting. It was Cosell who would be the first to claim that Cassius Clay (Muhammed Ali), would be a media star; and he championed Ali’s fight against the draft. His association with the boxer put him in front of Congressional committees and made him a regular guest lecturer in college classrooms.

Cosell later quit broadcasting boxing matches and openly expressed a loathing for that sport, and for football, as well. Humble Howard was also host of a weekly program (not a sports program) for ABC Contemporary Radio -- interviews and commentary titled, Speaking of Everything.

Cosell was a major figure, with colleague Jim McKay, in bringing the hard news story to the minds and souls of a nation in 1972 when several Olympians were tragically slain during the Winter Olympics in Germany. He later became more outspoken, even against his own colleagues who he had worked with for so many years. Many people felt that Cosell became a bitter, broken man in his later years following the death of his wife, Emmy. She was the only one who could tell him to “...shut up, Howard. Nobody cares.”

The once-powerful ‘voice that roared’ left Monday Night Football after fourteen years.

Howard Cosell died in 1995. Roon Arledge said, “Howard Cosell was one of the most original people ever to appear on American TV. He became a giant by telling the truth in an industry that was not used to hearing it and considered it revolutionary.”

Events
March 25th.

1902 - Irving W. Colburn patented the sheet glass drawing machine.

1911 - A turning point in labor laws -- especially concerning health and safety -- occurred as a result of a tragic fire in a New York City garment factory. Fire broke out at about 4:30p.m. at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company trapping young, immigrant workers behind locked doors. Many jumped to their deaths or were burned beyond recognition. The 18-minute fire left 146 dead; but they did not die in vain as new laws were passed to protect children and others from slave-type labor conditions. The owners of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company were indicted for manslaughter.

1913 - The Palace Theatre opened its doors in New York City. Ed Wynn was first on the vaudeville bill. Some 20 years later, Wynn would be named as radio’s top entertainer. He later became popular on television, as well.

1931 - Hal Kemp and his orchestra recorded Whistles, with Skinnay Ennis, for Brunswick Records. Both Kemp and Ennis sang in the Dorsey Brothers Concert Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Eugene Ormandy (later, conductor of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra). The pair were part of the orchestra vocal quartet that also featured Nye Mayhew and Saxey Dowell in 1928.

1934 - Horton Smith won the first Masters golf tournament under the magnolia trees of Augusta National in Georgia.

1936 - The Detroit Red Wings defeated the Montreal Maroons in the longest hockey game to date. The game went on and on and on for 2 hours, 56 minutes.

1937 - Babe Ruth was reported to have received $25,000 a year for the Quaker Oats Company to use his name in ads for Quaker Oatmeal.

1941 - The first paprika mill was incorporated in Dollon, SC. Now you know where those little paprikas that spice up your potato salad come from...

1943 - Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore premiered on network radio. The pair replaced the popular Abbott and Costello following Lou Costello’s heart attack. Durante and Moore stayed on the air for four years. Moore would later make a beat to television with The Garry Moore Show and To Tell the Truth both on CBS. Durante would also become a TV star on ABC with The Jimmy Durante Show in addition to nightclub appearances, movies and records.

1954 - Radio Corporation of America (RCA) began commercial production of TV sets that were equipped to receive programs in living color. To buy one of those huge sets, television buyers spent $1,000 -- and more.

1954 - Our wayback machine takes us to the RKO Pantages Theater in Los Angeles, as we remember the 26th Annual Academy Awards. Actor/singer/dancer Donald O’Connor and actor Fredric March (in New York) kept the audience informed on who won what. From Here to Eternity (Buddy Adler, producer) was the big flick of the year, picking up the Oscar for Best Director for Fred Zinnemann, Best Supporting Actor for Frank Sinatra and Best Supporting Actress for Donna Reed, in addition to Best Writing/Screenplay (Daniel Taradash); Best Cinematography/Black-and-White (Burnett Guffey); Best Sound/Recording (John P. Livadary, Columbia SSD); and Best Film Editing (William A. Lyon). The Best Actor award for the films of 1953 went to William Holden for Stalag 17 while the Best Actress award went to Audrey Hepburn for Roman Holiday. Secret Love from Calamity Jane was the Best Music/Song of the Year (Sammy Fain, music, Paul Francis Webster, lyrics). An interesting note: The Best Writing/Story and Screenplay went to the 1953 version of Titanic (Charles Brackett, Walter Reisch, Richard L. Breen). Other memorable movies that year (some Oscar winners, some not): The Robe, Shane, Mogambo, The Moon is Blue and Hondo.

1961 - Elvis Presley performed his first post-Army appearance, a benefit for planning and building the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The concert raised well over $64,000 and raised public awareness of the need for the memorial.

1971 - Tom Jones went gold with his single, She’s a Lady. When Tom gingerly placed the gold disk on his stereo and played it, he was shocked to hear himself singing “Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa...” for more than four minutes and when he tried to stop it, he couldn’t. Amazing!

1972 - The group, America, rode to the top of the pop music charts with their LP, America, and the single (included on the LP), A Horse with No Name. A Horse With No Name would be the group’s only gold record and one of two number one songs (the other was Sister Golden Hair, 6/14/75). America placed 11 tunes on the pop music charts between 1972 and 1983. George Martin, the producer of The Beatles, was behind five America tunes, including Tin Man, Lonely People, Sister Golden Hair, Daisy Jane and Today’s the Day. Dan Peek, Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell were the original lineup of the trio that won the Best New Artist Grammy in 1972.

1972 - Bobby Hull joined Gordie Howe to become only the second National Hockey League player to score 600 career goals. Hull played for the Chicago Blackhawks and Howe spent his NHL career with the Detroit Red Wings.

1985 - Oscar time again? Yes, and for the 57th time ... and at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles, no less. Host for the big show was actor/director Jack Lemmon (no stranger to Oscar, himself). The Best Picture of 1985 was Amadeus, produced by Saul Zaentz. The flick, about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, also won Oscars for Best Director for Milos Forman and Best Actor for F. Murray Abraham. The film also won top honors for Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Peter Shaffer); Best Costume Design (Theodor Pistek); Best Sound (Mark Berger, Thomas Scott II, Todd Boekelheide, Christopher Newman); and Best Makeup (Paul LeBlanc, Dick Smith). Sally Field was pronounced Best Actress for Places in the Heart, Best Supporting Actor was Haing S. Ngor for The Killing Fields, and the Best Supporting Actress Oscar was given to Peggy Ashcroft for A Passage to India. Stevie Wonder’s I Just Called to Say I Love You from The Woman in Red took the honors for Best Movie/Song. And the Academy gave an honorary Oscar to Jimmy Stewart in recognition of more than 70 films in his 50-year career. Stewart earned one Oscar for Best Actor in Philadelphia Story (1940), and nominations for Best Actor in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Harvey, It’s a Wonderful Life and Anatomy of a Murder.

1991 - Hollywood’s best got all dolled up and headed over to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to watch Billy Crystal host the 63rd Academy Awards show. Billy sported an Armani tuxedo as did actors Jeff Goldblum, Tom Hanks, Dennis Hopper, Steve Martin and Denzel Washington. Also clad in Armani ... gowns ... were Oscar nominees Michelle Pfeiffer, Julia Roberts and Jessica Tandy, prompting Women’s Wear Daily to refer to the occasion as the “Armani Awards”. Best Picture of the year (1990) was Dances with Wolves (Jim Wilson, Kevin Costner, producers). Costner also won for his Best Direction of Dances with Wolves. The Best Actor Oscar went to Jeremy Irons for Reversal of Fortune. Best Actress was Kathy Bates for Misery. The prize for Best Supporting Actor was claimed by Joe Pesci for GoodFellas and Best Supporting Actress was Whoopi Goldberg for Ghost. The Best Music/Song was presented to Stephen Sondheim for Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man) from Dick Tracy.

ShadowThomas
03-25-2007, 12:43 AM
Page 2 of 1 for 3/25/07
Birthdays
March 25th.

1867 - John Gutzon Borglum
sculptor: Mt. Rushmore National Memorial [George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt]; died March 6, 1941

1867 - Arturo Toscanini
68 years in musical career: conductor: Milan, Carnegie Hall, Philadelphia Orchestra, NBC Symphony Orchestra; cellist at age 19; died Jan 16, 1957

1881 - Bela Bartok
composer: Mikrokosmos, Concerto for Orchestra, Music for Strings, Percussion and Celeste, Solo Sonata for Violin, Concerto No. 2 for Violin and Orchestra; died Sep 26, 1945

1901 - Ed Begley
actor: The Unsinkable Molly Brown, Sweet Bird of Youth, Sorry Wrong Number, On Dangerous Ground, The Oscar; died Apr 28, 1970

1903 - Frankie Carle (Carlone)
pianist, bandleader [w/Horace Heidt], led own band: Saturday Night is the Loneliest Night of the Year, wrote: Oh What It Seemed to Be, Falling Leaves, Lover’s Lullaby; died Mar 7, 2001

1908 - David Lean
Academy Award-winning director: Lawrence of Arabia [1962], The Bridge on the River Kwai [1957]; Dr. Zhivago, A Passage to India, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations; died Apr 16, 1991

1909 - Dutch (Emil John) Leonard
baseball: pitacher: Brooklyn Dodgers Washington Nationals [all-star: 1940, 1943-1945], Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs [all-star: 1951]; died Apr 17, 1983

1918 - Howard Cosell (Cohen)
TV sports commentator; died Apr 23, 1995; see Humble Howard Day [above]

1919 - Jeanne Cagney
actress: A Lion is in the Streets, Quicksand; sister of actor James Cagney; died Dec 7, 1984

1921 - Nancy Kelly
actress: The Great Gatsby [1926], To the Shores of Tripoli, The Bad Seed; died Jan 2, 1995

1921 - Simone Signoret (Kaminker)
Academy Award-winning actress: Room at the Top [1959], Ship of Fools, Is Paris Burning?; died Sep 30, 1985

1922 - Eileen Ford
founded famous modeling agency [1946]: Ford models

1925 - (Mary) Flannery O’Connor
writer: A Good Man is Hard to Find; died Aug 3, 1964

1928 - James A. Lovell Jr.
astronaut: first to complete 4 spaceflights, first to make 2 flights to the Moon: aboard Gemini 7 [1965: spent 14 days in space] for rendezvous in orbit with Gemini 6; commander of Gemini 12 [Nov 1966: last Gemini mission]; command module pilot of Apollo 8 [Dec 1968: man’s first flight around the moon]; commander of Apollo 13 [Apr 1970: planned lunar landing that was aborted after an explosion on Apollo service module

1932 - Woody (Woodson George) Held
baseball: NY Yankees, KC Athletics, Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, Chicago White Sox

1932 - Wes Santee
runner: miler: “America’s greatest mile prospect of all time,” who never quite ran the mile in under 4 minutes; banned by AAU for expense violations just before 1956 Olympics

1934 - Johnny Burnette
‘The Master’: singer: Dreamin’, You’re Sixteen; brother of singer Dorsey Burnette; killed in boating accident Aug 14, 1964

1934 - Gloria Steinem
feminist; publisher: Ms.

1938 - Hoyt Axton
singer, musician, songwriter: Greenback Dollar, The Pusher, Joy to the World, Never Been to Spain [Axton’s mother, Mae Boren Axton, wrote Elvis Presley’s Heartbreak Hotel]; actor: The Rousters, Gremlins, Disorganized Crime, The Civil War, Kingfish: A Story of Huey P. Long, King Cobra; died Oct 26, 1999

1940 - Anita Bryant
singer: Paper Roses, Till There Was You; Miss Oklahoma and runner-up to Miss America [1958]; Florida orange juice spokesperson

1941 - Barclay Plager
hockey: NHL: SL Blues

1942 - Aretha Franklin
‘Lady Soul’: Grammy [15] Award-winning singer; Respect, Baby I Love You, Natural Woman, Chain of Fools, Think, Day Dreaming; first woman inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [1987]; actress: The Blues Brothers

1943 - Paul Michael Glaser
actor: Starsky & Hutch, Single Bars Single Women; director: Butterflies are Free, The Air up There, The Cutting Edge, The Running Man, The Amazons, Band of the Hand

1947 - Elton John (Reginald Kenneth Dwight)
musician, singer songwriter: Your Song, Honky Cat, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Bennie & The Jets, Daniel, Philadelphia Freedom; actor: Tommy

1948 - Bonnie Bedelia (Culkin)
actress: Die Hard, Die Hard 2, Die Hard with a Vengeance, Presumed Innocent, They Shoot Horses Don’t They

1948 - Kelly Garrett
actress, singer: Your Hit Parade, Headliners with David Frost: That Was the Week that Was

1949 - Neil Jones
musician: group: Amen Corner: Gin House Blues, Bend Me Shape Me, [If Paradise Is] Half as Nice

1949 - Jean Potvin
hockey: NHL: LA Kings, Philadelphia Flyers, NY Islanders, Cleveland Barons, Oklahoma City Stars, Minnesota North Stars

1951 - Maizie Williams
singer: group: Boney M: Daddy Cool, Brown Girl in the Ring, Rivers of Babylon

1953 - Mary Gross
actress: The Santa Clause, Troop Beverly Hills, Feds, Club Paradise, Billy, A Mighty Wind; comedienne: Saturday Night Live; sister of actor, Michael Gross

1961 - John Stockwell (Samuels)
actor: Born to Ride, Top Gun, City Limits, Christine, Losin’ It, My Science Project; director: Undercover

1965 - Sarah Jessica Parker
actress: Sex and the City, Miami Rhapsody, L.A. Story, Honeymoon in Vegas, The Little Match Girl, The Innocents, Annie, Square Pegs, A Year in the Life, Equal Justice; opera singer: Hansel and Gretel, Cavalleria Rusticana, Pagliacci, Parade; dancer: Cincinnati Ballet Theatre, American Ballet Theatre

1966 - Jeff Healey
musician: guitar, singer, songwriter: group: Jeff Healey Band; CBC radio show: My Kind of Jazz

1967 - Debi Thomas
figure skater: Olympic bronze medalist [Calgary, Alberta, 1988]

Chart Toppers
March 25th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
Beg Your Pardon - Francis Craig
I’ll Hold You in My Heart (Till I Can Hold You in My Arms) - Eddy Arnold

1956 Lisbon Antigua - Nelson Riddle
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
A Tear Fell - Teresa Brewer
Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley

1964 She Loves You - The Beatles
Fun Fun Fun - The Beach Boys
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Saginaw, Michigan - Lefty Frizzell

1972 A Horse with No Name - America
Puppy Love - Donny Osmond
Mother and Child Reunion - Paul Simon
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Working My Way Back to You/Forgive Me, Girl - Spinners
Him - Rupert Holmes
Why Don’t You Spend the Night - Ronnie Milsap

1988 Never Gonna Give You Up - Rick Astley
I Get Weak - Belinda Carlisle
Man in the Mirror - Michael Jackson
Life Turned Her that Way - Ricky Van Shelton


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
03-25-2007, 07:44 PM
Shadow.....Thanks... ;)

icedreams
03-25-2007, 09:09 PM
Thanks Shadow ;)

ShadowThomas
03-25-2007, 10:54 PM
85th day of 2007 - 280 remaining Page one. :)

Monday, March 26, 2007
TELESCOPE DAY.

On this day in 1936, the first telescope with a 200-inch-diameter, reflecting mirror was shipped -- very, very carefully -- from Corning, New York to Mt. Palomar Observatory in California. The lens of the Hale telescope weighed 20 tons. It was dedicated at Mt. Palomar in 1948.

It is a far cry from the first telescope invented in 1608 by Hans Lippershey of the Netherlands. Hans made eye glasses and one day, while holding a lens in each hand, he looked through both lenses at one time. What he saw was an enlarged image at the end of the two lined-up lenses. Lippershey carried his accidental discovery one step further, mounting a lens at either end of a tube, creating the first telescope. Many experiments had been made with lenses magnifying objects, with documentation as far back as the 1200s. But, Lippershey has been given the credit, if not the patent. Galileo heard of Lippershey’s invention and built his own telescope in 1609. Its magnification power was a mere 33X about the same as that of opera glasses.

The Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar remains one of the most widely-used scientific telescopes on the planet -- as it looks at other planets and beyond. Galileo would be amazed!

Events
March 26th.


1885 - The first commercial moving-picture film was produced in Rochester, NY. Eastman Kodak, the film and camera maker still manufactures a huge variety of film from the same place. Eastman Kodak was ‘developed’ by George Eastman. What does the word Kodak stand for? Nothing. One of the most widely recognized trademarks in the world was named because it had a unique sound that started with the letter K, and could be pronounced and spelled in almost any language. Film did go by the designation of Eastman Film at one time, but the name Kodak has been promoted as a lasting imprint in all forms of photography since 1892.

1937 - Joe DiMaggio said he’d take Ty Cobb’s advice and use a 36 or 37-ounce baseball bat instead of a 40-ounce stick during that season. The result? ‘Joltin’ Joe’ hit .346 during the season with 46 home runs -- the most he ever hit in a single year. In the words of Yankee broadcaster Mel Allen, “How about that!” During his 13-year career with the Yankees, DiMaggio connected for 2,214 hits, 361 homers, batted a .325 average, played in 1,736 total games and came to the plate to bat 6,821 times.

1941 - Jimmie Lunceford and his orchestra recorded the tune, Battle Axe, for Decca Records. Lunceford began with the Chickasaw Syncopaters, a 10-piece band, in the late 1920s. By 1934, he would add names like Sy Oliver, Willie Smith, Earl Caruthers, Joe Thomas, Al Norris, Moses Allen, and James Crawford to form orchestras that would entertain through the mid-1940s.

1951 - The U.S. Air Force flag was approved on this day. The flag included the coat of arms, 13 white stars and the Air Force seal on a blue background.

1953 - Dr. Jonas Salk announced a new vaccine -- to prevent poliomyelitis.

1956 - Red Buttons made his debut as a television actor in a presentation of Studio One on CBS television.

1958 - The RKO Pantages Theater, Los Angeles, was the scene of 30th Annual Academy Awards celebration. The show was hosted by Rosalind Russell, James Stewart, David Niven, Jack Lemmon, Bob Hope and Donald Duck (on film). There were several memorable films produced in 1957, but two blockbusters shot it out this night, The Bridge on the River Kwai and Sayonara. The Bridge on the River Kwai (Sam Spiegel, producer) took Oscars for Best Picture; Best Actor (Alec Guinness); Cinematography (Jack Hildyard); Director (David Lean); Film Editing (Peter Taylor); Scoring (Malcolm Arnold); and writing (Pierre Boulle, Carl Foreman, Michael Wilson). Meanwhile, Sayonara (William Goetz, producer) won for Best Supporting Actor (Red Buttons); Supporting Actress (Miyoshi Umeki); Art Direction (Ted Haworth); Set Decoration (Robert Priestley); and Sound Recording (George Groves). And, lest we forget, Joanne Woodward won the Best Actress Oscar for The Three Faces of Eve. The prize for Best Music/Song went to James Van Heusen (music), Sammy Cahn (lyrics) for All the Way (the classic Sinatra song)from The Joker Is Wild.

1960 - The University of Southern California (USC) captured the NCAA swimming title, becoming the first Pacific Coast school to do so.

1969 - Marcus Welby, M.D., a TV movie, was seen on ABC. Ratings showed the program to be so popular that it was turned into a long-running series starring Robert Young.

1971 - William Conrad starred as Cannon on CBS-TV. This also was a one-time TV event that became a popular series that year.

1972 - The Los Angeles Lakers broke a National Basketball Association record by winning 69 of 82 games.

1974 - David Essex received a gold record for the hit, Rock On. Though a million seller, Rock On never made it to number one on the pop-rock charts -- stalling at number five. It was on the charts for a total of 14 weeks. Essex (real name: David Cook) portrayed the role of Christ in the London production of Godspell. He starred in several British films in 1970.

1975 - Tommy, the film based on the rock opera by the group, The Who, premiered in London.

1979 - Michigan State and Indiana State met in the all-time highest rated basketball telecast. The NBC coverage earned a 24.1 rating. Indiana State’s unprecedented 33 consecutive-win streak came to an end as the Spartans of Michigan State won 75-64. A pair of future NBA Hall of Famers played against each other that night: Larry Bird, later of the Boston Celtics, scored 19 points while Magic Johnson, even later, of the Los Angeles Lakers, scored 24 points.

1987 - The National Federation of High School Associations adopted the college distance three-point shot, with a perimeter of 21 feet from the center of the backboard.

1990 - Host Billy Crystal kept us smiling for the 62nd Annual Academy Awards, staged at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members voted Driving Miss Daisy the Best Picture of 1989 (Richard D. Zanuck, Lili Fini Zanuck, producers). The Best Director Oscar was won by Oliver Stone for Born on the Fourth of July. Best Actor was Daniel Day-Lewis for My Left Foot and Best Actress was Jessica Tandy in Driving Miss Daisy (the 80-year-old actress was a favorite to win). Oscars for Actor and Actress in a Supporting Role went to Denzel Washington (Glory) and Brenda Fricker (My Left Foot), respectively. Best Music/Song winners were Alan Menken (music), Howard Ashman (lyrics) for Under the Sea from The Little Mermaid. You’re probably still humming this tune from that full-length animated film from Walt Disney Studios. Other popular 1989 films that were honored as nominees or winners include: Field of Dreams; Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade; Back to the Future Part II; Lethal Weapon II; Batman; Dead Poets Society; When Harry Met Sally; and Sex, Lies, and Videotape.

1996 - The 68th Annual Academy Awards show was held at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. Actress/comedienne Whoopi Goldberg was the hostess with the mostest this night. The Best Picture (of 1995) was Braveheart (Mel Gibson, Alan Ladd Jr., Bruce Davey, producers). Mel Gibson also won the Oscar for Best Director (Braveheart). The flick won three additional Oscars; however, none were in the Acting categories. The Best Actor was Nicolas Cage for Leaving Las Vegas. The Best Actress award went to Susan Sarandon for Dead Man Walking. Best Supporting Actor was Kevin Spacey for The Usual Suspects and Best Supporting Actress was Mira Sorvino for Mighty Aphrodite. The ’toon Pocahontas was a winner in the tunes categories: Best Music/Original Musical or Comedy Score to Alan Menken, Stephen Schwartz and Best Music/Song: Alan Menken (music), Stephen Schwartz (lyrics) for Colors of the Wind from the animated film.

2000 - It was a beautiful evening at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. And, inside, everything was beautiful, too, as the film, American Beauty, captured Best Picture (producers: Bruce Cohen and Dan Jinks) at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards presentation, hosted by comedian Billy Crystal. The picture, nominated in eight categories, received four more Oscars: Best Director (Sam Mendes), Best Actor (Kevin Spacey), Best Original Screen Play (Alan Ball), Best Cinematography (Conrad L. Hall). Although Hilary Swank received the award for Best Actress in Boys Don’t Cry, Annette Bening, nominated for her performance in American Beauty, was stunningly beautiful as the lady-in-waiting. Bening, who gave birth to her fourth child, a girl, sixteen days after this Oscar ceremony, congratulated her husband, Warren Beatty, who was presented with the Irving Thalberg Award for his career as a movie-maker. Another beauty, Angelina Jolie, received the Best Supporting Actress award for her role in Girl, Interrupted. Michael Caine gave the most beautiful acceptance speech of the night (Best Supporting Actor: The Cider House Rules). The film, a seven-time nominee, also won for Best Screenplay Adaptation (John Irving). The Matrix was also a big winner (Best Film Editing: Zach Staenberg, Best Sound: David E. Campbell, David Lee III, John T. Reitz, Gregg Rudloff; Best Sound Effects Editing: Dane A. Davis; Best Visual Effects: Steve Courtley, John Gaeta, Janek Sirrs, Jon Thum). The exquisite beauty of the costumes (Lindy Hemming) and makeup (Christine Blundell) in Topsy-Turvy earned the film two Oscars, while the statuette for Best Art Direction was presented to Rick Heinrichs and Peter Young for Sleepy Hollow. And, as always, Phil Collins made beautiful music. His You’ll Be in My Heart (Tarzan) captured the Oscar for Best Original Song.

ShadowThomas
03-25-2007, 10:56 PM
Page 2 of one.


Birthdays
March 26th.

1773 - Nathaniel Bowditch
astronomer, author: New American Practical Navigator; died Mar 16, 1838

1850 - Edward Bellamy
author: Looking Backward; died May 22, 1898

1859 - A.E. (Alfred Edward) Housman
British poet: A Shropshire Lad, Last Poems, More Poems, Collected Poems, Manuscript Poems; died Apr 30, 1936

1874 - Robert Frost
four-time Pulitzer prize-winning poet: Birches, Mending Wall, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening; read The Gift Outright at inauguration of John F. Kennedy; died Jan 29, 1963

1880 - Duncan Hines
author, traveler, cake-mix mogul; died Mar 15, 1959

1909 - Chips Rafferty (John William Goffage)
actor: The Desert Rats, The Sundowners, Wackiest Ship in the Army, Skullduggery; died May 27, 1971

1911 - Tennessee (Thomas Lanier) Williams
Pulitzer prize-winning playwright: A Streetcar Named Desire [1948], Cat on a Hot Tin Roof [1955]; The Glass Menagerie, Night of the Iguana, Summer and Smoke, The Rose Tattoo, Camino Real, Sweet Bird of Youth, Small Craft Warnings; died Feb 24, 1983

1914 - William Westmoreland
U.S. Army General: head of U.S. forces in Vietnam [1964-1968]; died July 18, 2005

1916 - Sterling Hayden (Sterling Relyea Walter)
actor: The Asphalt Jungle, Dr. Strangelove, The Godfather, 9 to 5, The Blue and the Gray; died May 23, 1986

1919 - Strother Martin Jr.
actor: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Cool Hand Luke, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, McLintock!, Rooster Cogburn, Slap Shot, The Wild Bunch; died Aug 1, 1980

1921 - Joe Loco (Jose Esteves Jr.)
jazz musician, arranger: credited with introducing the mambo [Tenderly: 1951] and cha-cha-cha [1953] to the US; died Feb 18, 1988

1923 - Bob Elliott
comedian: duo: Bob & Ray

1925 - Pierre Boulez
conductor: Pierre Boulez and his Ensemble Intercontemporain; played for Frank Zappa

1930 - Sandra Day O’Connor
1st woman nominated and appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court [1981]

1931 - Leonard Nimoy
actor: Star Trek; director: Three Men and a Baby

1932 - Dick Nolan
football: NY Giants; coach: New Orleans Saints

1934 - Gino Cappelletti
football: 1st kicker to kick a field goal in the AFL: New England Patriots [1960]; AFL Player of Year [1964; Patriot’s radio network commentator

1934 - Alan Arkin
actor: Catch-22, The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming; director: Little Murders

1937 - Wayne ‘The Wall’ Embry
Basketball Hall of Famer: Cincinnati Royals, Boston Celtics, Milwaukee Bucks; GM: Milwaukee Bucks: first African-American GM in major league sports

1940 - Braulio Baeza
National Horse Racing Hall of Famer: jockey: 1st to go over $3 million in purses in one year; leading money winner in 1965, 1966 and 1975; Eclipse award-winner [1972, 1975]

1940 - James Caan
actor: The Godfather, Rabbit Run, Brian’s Song, Dick Tracy, Rollerball, Alien Nation, For the Boys, Misery, Las Vegas

1940 - Rod Lauren
singer: If I Had a Girl, LP: I’m Rod Lauren

1942 - Erica Jong (Mann)
writer: Fear of Flying, Becoming Light, How to Save Your Own Life

1943 - Bob Woodward
investigative reporter: Washington Post: Watergate [w/reporter Carl Bernstein]; author: All the President’s Men [w/Carl Bernstein], The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court [w/Scott Armstrong], The Agenda : Inside the Clinton White House

1944 - Diana Ross (Diane Earle)
singer: group: The Supremes: I Hear a Symphony, Come See About Me; solo: Ain’t No Mountain High Enough, Theme from ‘Mahogany’, Love Hangover, You Keep Me Hangin’ On; actress: Lady Sings the Blues, Mahogany, The Wiz

1948 - Richard Tandy
musician: bass, keyboards: group: Electric Light Orchestra

1948 - Steven Tyler (Tallarico)
singer: group: Aerosmith: Janie’s Got a Gun, Crazy

1949 - Vicki Lawrence
Emmy Award-winning actress: The Carol Burnett Show [1975-76]; Vicki!, Mama’s Family; singer: The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia

1949 - Fran Sheehan
musician: bass: group: Boston: More than a Feeling, Long Time, Peace of Mind, Don’t Look Back, Man I’ll Never Be

1950 - Teddy Pendergrass
singer: Two Hearts [w/Stephanie Mills], Hold Me [w/Whitney Houston], solo LPs: Teddy, Love Language, Workin’ It Back, Joy

1950 - Martin Short
Emmy Award-winning actor, comedian: SCTV, The Show Formerly Known as the Martin Short Show; Saturday Night Live, The Three Amigos, Three Fugitives, Innerspace

1954 - Curtis Sliwa
founder: Guardian Angels, cyberangels.org

1957 - Leeza Gibbons
TV hostess: Entertainment Tonight, George Schlatter’s Funny People

1960 - Jennifer Grey
actress: Dirty Dancing, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, The Cotton Club; Joel Grey’s daughter

1960 - Marcus Allen
football [running back]: Kansas City Chiefs, LA Raiders: Super Bowl XVIII; Heisman Trophy Winner [1981]: holds record for number of games rushed 200 yards+ [5] for USC]

Chart Toppers
March 26th.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Blue Barron Orchestra (vocal: ensemble)
Far Away Places - Margaret Whiting
Powder Your Face with Sunshine - Evelyn Knight
Tennessee Saturday Night - Red Foley

1957 Young Love - Tab Hunter
Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
Party Doll - Buddy Knox
There You Go - Johnny Cash

1965 Eight Days a Week - The Beatles
Stop! In the Name of Love - The Supremes
The Birds and the Bees - Jewel Akens
I’ve Got a Tiger by the Tail - Buck Owens

1973 Love Train - O’Jays
Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001) - Deodato
Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye) - Gladys
Knight & The Pips
Teddy Bear Song - Barbara Fairchild

1981 Keep on Loving You - REO Speedwagon
Woman - John Lennon
The Best of Times - Styx
Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground - Willie Nelson

1989 The Living Years - Mike & The Mechanics
Eternal Flame - Bangles
Girl You Know It’s True - Milli Vanilli
New Fool at an Old Game - Reba McEntire


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

mdexter2
03-26-2007, 11:52 AM
Bump. :)
Cool idea for a thread Shadowman! Interesting stuff to say the least! Have a great day dude! :cool:

"History never looks like history when you are living through it. It always looks confusing and messy, and it always feels uncomfortable." ~ John W. Gardner

History will be kind to me for I intend to write it. ~ Winston Churchill

By despising all that has preceded us, we teach others to despise ourselves. ~ William Hazlitt, 'On Reading Old Books', 1821

History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to wake. ~ James Joyce, Ulysses

Wise men say, and not without reason, that whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who have been, and ever will be, animated by the same passions, and thus they must necessarily have the same results. ~ Niccolo Machiavelli

And lastly:

Hindsight is an exact science.

Don't look back, they might be gaining on you. :D :cool:

ShadowThomas
03-26-2007, 11:58 PM
86th day of 2007 - 279 remaining.

Tuesday, March 27, 2007
1 CORKSCREW DAY.

It was on this day in 1860 that the device which, officially, is a “covered gimlet screw with a ‘T’ handle” or, corkscrew, was patented by M. L. Byrn of New York City. Hooray for M. L.!

After all, if it wasn’t for the invention of the corkscrew we’d be pulling corks out of those wine bottles with our teeth ... and what would the sommeliers use?

Events
March 27th.

1841 - The first steam fire engine was tested in New York City.

1912 - First Lady Helen (Nellie) Taft, wife of U.S. President William Howard Taft, and the Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese Ambassador, planted the first two cherry trees in Washington DC. The trees are Yoshino cherries, and are still standing several hundred yards west of the John Paul Jones statue at the south end of 17th Street.

1917 - The Seattle Metropolitans, of the Pacific Coast League of Canada, defeated the Montreal Canadiens to become the first U.S. hockey team to win the Stanley Cup.

1920 - Film stars Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks were married this day.

1931 - From the Put Foot in Mouth Department: New York Giant’s Manager John McGraw told reporters that night baseball would never supplant baseball in its natural setting, under a warm sun.

1943 - Blue Ribbon Town was first heard on CBS radio. The show lasted only a year, but it became widely known as the program that introduced audiences to the one, the only, Groucho Marx.

1945 - Ella Fitzgerald and the Delta Rhythm Boys recorded the classic, It’s Only a Paper Moon for Decca Records.

1950 - Jazz pianist Erroll Garner became one of the first jazz instrumentalists to give a solo concert. He played the Music Hall in Cleveland, OH. In 1954, Garner would gain international applause for writing and recording a standard that has been presented many times since: Misty. Johnny Mathis and Sarah Vaughan are but two of many recording artists to offer vocal renditions of this renowned Garner composition. Play Misty for me.

1951 - Frank Sinatra recorded I’m a Fool to Want You for Columbia. This was one of the last songs Sinatra recorded for Mitch Miller, who had taken over as head of recording for the label.

1955 - Steve McQueen made his network TV debut on Goodyear Playhouse. McQueen starred in The Chivington Raid. In 1958, McQueen was starred in his own TV series, Wanted Dead or Alive, on NBC.

1957 - Jerry Lewis (in Hollywood) and actress Celeste Holm (in New York City) hosted the 29th Annual Academy Awards at the RKO Pantages Theater, Los Angeles. Looking at the list of winners and nominees, it seems as if 1956 was the year for bigger-than-life extravaganzas, epics and star-studded casts from the Best Picture, Around the World in 80 Days (Michael Todd, producer), to Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments. Others of that genre included The Rainmaker; Richard III; The Bad Seed; King Vidor’s War and Peace; and High Society; Written on the Wind, The King and I and Anastasia. Around the World in 80 Days received additional accolades for Best Writing/Best Screenplay - Adapted (James Poe, John Farrow, S.J. Perelman); Best Cinematography/Color (Lionel Lindon); Best Film Editing (Gene Ruggiero, Paul Weatherwax); and Best Music/Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture (Victor Young). The Oscar for Best Director went to George Stevens for Giant. Best Actor was Yul Brynner for The King and I and the Best Actress prize was given to Ingrid Bergman for Anastasia. Anthony Quinn was Best Supporting Actor in for Lust for Life and Dorothy Malone was Best Supporting Actress in Written on the Wind. The Best Music/Song Oscar was awarded to Jay Livingston and Ray Evans for Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera) from The Man Who Knew Too Much.

1958 - CBS Laboratories announced a new stereophonic record that was playable on ordinary LP phonographs, meaning, monaural. In stereo, on the proper equipment, a new rich and fuller sound was heard. It eventually became a standard for record and equipment buyers.

1971 - UCLA became the first team ever to win five consecutive NCAA basketball titles. The Bruins defeated Villanova 68-62. UCLA, under coaching legend John Wooden, dominated NCAA tournament play until 1974, when North Carolina State won the tourney. The Bruins roared back in one season to win the championship once more.

1971 - Janis Joplin started her second (and final) week at the top of the pop music charts with the hit, Me and Bobby McGee, written by Kris Kristofferson.

1972 - Adolph Rupp of the the University of Kentucky retired after 42 years of coaching the Wildcats. During his long tenure at Kentucky, Rupp won 874 games for a winning average of 82.1 percent. Rupp was second only to Clair Bee who coached at Rider College in New Jersey and at Long Island University.

1973 - It was Oscar night (for the 45th time) at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The show was hosted by Carol Burnett, Michael Caine, Charlton Heston and Rock Hudson. Most people, when offered an Academy Award, can’t get up to the stage fast enough to claim the little gold guy. But, Marlon Brando said, “You can keep it," when AMPAS offered him the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance as The Godfather. Brando refused to accept the award because he felt that the U.S. and Hollywood were discriminating against American Indians. The Godfather (Albert S. Ruddy, producer) also was awarded the the prize for Best Picture. That Oscar was accepted, as were several for Cabaret: Best Director (Bob Fosse), Best Actress (Liza Minnelli) and Best Supporting Actor (Joel Grey). Best Supporting Actress was Eileen Heckart for Butterflies are Free and the Best Music/Song prize went to Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn for The Morning After from The Poseidon Adventure.

1985 - Billy Dee Williams received a star on the famous Hollywood Walk of Fame. His place, for those looking to visit, is located between Joan Davis and Harry Carey.

1995 - OK, into the limousine, as we head for the 67th Annual Academy Awards at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. David Letterman was the host at these awards for the motion pictures of 1994. The Best Picture was Forrest Gump (Wendy Finerman, Steve Starkey, Steve Tisch, producers). Robert Zemeckis and Tom Hanks won Oscars for Best Director and Best Actor, respectively, in ... you got it ... Forrest Gump. The Best Actress prize was claimed by Jessica Lange for Blue Sky. Best Supporting Actor was Martin Landau for Ed Wood and the Best Supporting Actress award went to Dianne Wiest for Bullets Over Broadway. The Best Music/Song Oscar went to Elton John (music) and Tim Rice (lyrics) for the fine job they did for the animated movie, The Lion King, with the song, Can You Feel the Love Tonight.

Birthdays
March 27th.

1797 - Alfred de Vigny
poet, novelist: Poemes, Cinq-Mars, Servitude et Grandeur Militaires; died Sep 17, 1863

1813 - Nathaniel Currier
lithographer: Currier & Ives hand-colored lithograph prints of 19th century daily life; died Nov 20, 1888

1845 - Wilhelm Roentgen (Röntgen)
Nobel Prize-winning scientist [1901]: discovered x-rays; died Feb 10, 1923

1868 - Patty Smith Hill
songwriter: Good Morning to All [predecessor of Happy Birthday to You]; died in May 25, 1946

1879 - Edward Steichen
artist, photographer: US Army supervisor of aerial photographic operations [WWI], Vogue, Vanity Fair, US Navy special unit of photographers shot naval aviation and combat [WWII], Director of Dept. of Photography at Museum of Modern Art, New York; died Mar 25, 1973

1892 - (James) Thorne Smith Jr.
author: Topper, Rain in the Doorway, The Stray Lamb; died June 21, 1934

1899 - Gloria Swanson (Gloria May Josephine Svensson)
actress: Airport ’75, Sadie Thompson, Sunset Boulevard, Teddy at the Throttle; author: Swanson on Swanson; died Apr 4, 1983

1914 - Richard Denning (Denninger)
actor: Mr. & Mrs. North, Hawaii Five-O, Alice Through the Looking Glass, An Affair to Remember, Black Beauty, Creature from the Black Lagoon; died Oct 11, 1998

1914 - Snooky Lanson (Roy Landman)
singer: By the Light of the Silvery Moon; vocalist on Your Hit Parade on radio and TV; died July 2, 1990

1920 - Richard Hayman
musician: house conductor for Mercury Records; harmonica player: Ruby; Theme from The Three Penny Opera [Moritat]

1924 - Sarah Vaughan
‘The Divine One’: jazz singer: Broken-Hearted Melody; Make Yourself Comfortable, Whatever Lola Wants, Passing Strangers [w/Billy Eckstine]; Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award [1989]; died Apr 3, 1990

1927 - Anthony Lewis
author: Gideon’s Trumpet, Make No Law, The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment

1927 - Mstislav (Leopold) Rostropovich
composer, musician: cello: his most important legacy is the large number of works written for him by greatest composers: Prokofiev, Khachaturian, Miaskovsky, Shostakovich, Britten, Lutoslawski, Bliss, Dutilleux; conductor: National Symphony Orchestra; humanitarian: he continues to support humanitarian efforts around the world

1931 - David Janssen (David Harold Meyer)
actor: The Fugitive, The Green Berets, Two Minute Warning, Francis Goes to West Point, Once is Not Enough; died Feb 13, 1980

1931 - Burt Collins
jazz musician: trumpet, flugel horn: played w/Jess Roden Band, Lalo Schifrin, T. Rex

1932 - Wes (John Wesley) Covington
baseball: baseball: Milwaukee Braves [World Series: 1957, 1958], Chicago White Sox, KC Athletics, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, LA Dodgers [World Series: 1966]

1939 - Cale Yarborough
auto racer: Daytona 500 winner [1968, 1977, 1983, 1984]

1940 - Austin Pendleton
actor: Mr. and Mrs. Bridge, Guarding Tess, My Cousin Vinny, What’s Up Doc?, Petulia

1942 - Michael York (York-Johnson)
actor: Cabaret, The Three Musketeers, Murder on the Orient Express, Logan’s Run, The Heat of the Day, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Wrongfully Accused, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me

1946 - Bill (William Paul) ‘Suds’ Sudakis
baseball: LA Dodgers, NY Mets, Texas Rangers, NY Yankees, California Angels, Cleveland Indians

1947 - Tom Sullivan
singer, composer: If You Could See What I Hear

1947 - Doug Wilkerson
football: North Carolina Central, Houston Oilers, SD Chargers

1950 - Tony Banks
musician: keyboards: group: Genesis

1950 - Vic (Victor Lanier) Harris
baseball: Texas Rangers, Chicago Cubs, SL Cardinals, SF Giants, Milwaukee Brewers

1951 - Bobby Lalonde
hockey: NHL: Vancouver Canucks, Atlanta Flames, Boston Bruins, Calgary Flames

1952 - Maria Schneider
actress: Last Tango in Paris, Les Nuits Fauves

1953 - Annemarie Moser-Proell
skier: held all-time record six women’s World Cup championships, five in succession [1971-75]

1959 - Andrew Farriss
musician: keyboards: group: INXS: Just Keep Walking, The One Thing, Original Sin, Me, Melting in the Sun, This Time

1963 - Quentin Tarantino
Academy Award-winning screenwriter: Pulp Fiction [1994]; writer, director: From Dusk Till Dawn, Four Rooms, Pulp Fiction, True Romance, Reservoir Dogs

1970 - Mariah Carey
Grammy Award-winning singer: Vision of Love, Best New Artist [1991]; LPs: Mariah Carey, Emotions, MTV Unplugged, Music Box, Merry Christmas, Daydream, Butterfly, Rainbow; has sold more than 120 million albums and singles since her debut in 1990; only artist with a #1 single in every year of the 1990s; has spent more weeks at #1 than any other artist.

Chart Toppers
March 27th.

1950 Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
There’s No Tomorrow - Tony Martin
If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Chatanoogie Shoe Shine Boy - Red Foley

1958 Don’t/I Beg of You - Elvis Presley
Tequila - The Champs
Breathless - Jerry Lee Lewis
Ballad of a Teenage Queen - Johnny Cash

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
19th Nervous Breakdown - The Rolling Stones
Nowhere Man - The Beatles
Waitin’ in Your Welfare Line - Buck Owens

1974 Dark Lady - Cher
Sunshine on My Shoulders - John Denver
Mockingbird - Carly Simon & James Taylor
There’s a Honky Tonk Angel (Who’ll Take Me Back In) - Conway Twitty

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
Open Arms - Journey
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
She Left Love All Over Me - Razzy Bailey

1990 Black Velvet - Alannah Myles
Love Will Lead You Back - Taylor Dayne
I Wish It Would Rain Down - Phil Collins
Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
03-27-2007, 11:00 PM
87th day of 2007 - 278 remaining.

Wednesday, March 28, 2007
RADIO CAROLINE DAY. :)

Radio Caroline debuted as the first pirate radio station to broadcast off the coast of England. On this day in 1964, the combination of rock music and lively disk jockey patter played to a huge audience in Great Britain; but well out of reach of British authorities. However, that didn’t stop them from trying, albeit unsuccessfully, to shut down the radio station ship. Radio Caroline had become competition to the staid and usually dull British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

Today, all that is different, as there is licensed radio competition throughout Great Britain. The BBC and the giant, government-owned network has caught up with the times by offering five different services to appeal to wide audiences. They are simply known as ‘Radio 1’ through ‘Radio 5’ ... No ‘Zees’, ‘Qs’ or ‘Bees’, just numbers that include a rock channel, a talk channel, a nostalgia/easy listening channel, a classical/fine arts channel and a news channel.

Events
March 28th.

1797 - Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire patented a device we commonly call the washing machine. Back then, however, there was a whole different way of speaking -- and of spelling -- to describe this wonderful invention. “This device is an improvement in washing cloaths.” Wow! Cloaths! Good thing Nathaniel Briggs didn’t have anything to do with vacuum cleaner, garbage disposal or other modern conveniences...

1865 - Outdoor advertising legislation was enacted in New York State. The law banned “painting on stones, rocks and trees.” Of course, it didn’t say anything about painting on buildings, bridges, subway cars, etc.

1891 - The first world championship for amateur weightlifters was held in London.

1922 - Bradley A. Fiske of Washington, D.C. patented a microfilm reading device.

1939 - Hal Kemp and his orchestra recorded Three Little Fishies for Victor Records.

1941 - Louella Parsons hosted Hollywood Premiere for the first time on CBS radio. The gossip columnist introduced famous guests who appeared in dramatized stories.

1944 - WQXR radio in New York City, owned by The New York Times newspaper, banned singing commercials from its airwaves as of this day. Understandable, since the station has always been the classical music voice of Manhattan and there aren’t many classical singing commercials.

1963 - Sonny Werblin announced that the New York Titans of the American Football League was changing names. Instead of Titans, the team would be known as the New York Jets.

1967 - Raymond Burr starred in a TV movie titled Ironside. The show, about a wheelchair-bound detective, became very popular as a weekly series in the fall of 1967. Burr, known to millions as determined lawyer, Perry Mason (a past TV hit), played the part of Robert Ironside in the new show. He was joined by characters, Detective Sgt. Ed Brown (Don Galloway), Eve Whitfield (Barbara Anderson), Mark Sanger (Don Mitchell) and Commissioner Dennis Randall (Gene Lyons).

1974 - The group, Blue Swede, received a gold record for the single, Hooked on a Feeling. As payback for tormenting listeners worldwide with the introduction of “ooga-chocka, ooga-chocka,” when the group played their gold record, they heard the original B.J. Thomas version of Hooked on a Feeling. They were so excited by this development, they ooga-chocka’d all night long.

1974 - A streaker (i.e.: someone running around naked), ran onto the set of The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson. The clever NBC censors decided to blackout the lower half of the TV screen on the videotape to prevent an ‘X’ rating. The streaker was arrested, but released, for “lack of evidence,” said Johnny.

1977 - Rocky, Network, All the President’s Men. Titles to remember from the 49th Annual Academy Awards presentation, held this day at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Hosted by a cast of, uh, four (Warren Beatty, Ellen Burstyn, Jane Fonda, and Richard Pryor), Rocky collected Oscars for Best Picture (Irwin Winkler, Robert Chartoff, producers); Best Director (John G. Avildsen); and Film Editing (Scott Conrad, Richard Halsey). Network hauled in the gold for Best Actor (Peter Finch); Actress (Faye Dunaway); Supporting Actress (Beatrice Straight); and Writing (Paddy Chayefsky). All the President’s Men was given awards for Best Supporting Actor (Jason Robards); Art Direction (George Jenkins); Set Direction (George Gaines); Sound (Dick Alexander, Les Fresholtz, Arthur Piantadosi, Jim Webb); and Writing (William Goldman). The Best Music/Song Oscar-winner titles are memorable too: Barbra Streisand (music) and Paul Williams (lyrics) for Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born) from A Star is Born.

1979 - Extensive reevaluation of the safety of nuclear power-generating operations in the U.S. began in earnest this day. The reevaluations were prompted by a series of accidents that began at 4 a.m. at Three Mile Island. Failures in equipment brought the nuclear power plant close to a uranium core meltdown. The fear of extensive radiation contamination spread throughout the rural Pennsylvania area and the state capital of Harrisburg, just ten miles away.

1981 - The group Blondie, featuring Debbie Harry, received a gold record for the tune, Rapture. At the time, the pop-rock hit was perched at the top of the pop music charts. Blondie had eight charted hits. Four of them were million sellers, beginning with their first release, Heart of Glass in 1979. Four of the eight hits were number one on the charts, as well.

1985 - Roger Waters of Pink Floyd made radio history. His Radio City Music Hall concert in New York was broadcast live using a new high-tech sound system called ‘holophonics’. It is said to have recreated the stage experience in amazing detail. Didn’t surround (sound) start out that way?

1985 - Bill Cosby broke more records with The Cosby Show on NBC-TV. The program was the highest-rated program of any network series since 1983. It was also the first show in over a decade to nab the top Nielsen Ratings from the Academy Awards presentation (seen the same night). The Cosby Show became the highest-rated series since 1978 when Mork and Mindy, starring Robin Williams and Pam Dawber, premiered on ABC.

1986 - More than 6,000 radio stations of all format varieties (even Muzak) played We are the World simultaneously at 10:15 a.m. EST. The promotion became part of the biggest participatory event in history by linking a human chain of millions of people from sea to sea. Ken Kragen was the promotion genius behind the plan that raised millions of dollars and created awareness for the African famine relief project.

Birthdays
March 28th.

1890 - Paul Whiteman
bandleader: Washboard Blues, Ol’ Man River, Felix the Cat, Heartache, Ain’t Misbehavin’; died Dec 29, 1967

1899 - August A. Busch Jr.
beer magnate; St. Louis Cardinals owner; died Sep 29, 1989

1903 - Rudolf Serkin
concert pianist: “An artist of unusual and impressive talents in possession of a crystalline technique, plenty of power, delicacy, and tone pure and full.”; “A masterly musician ... a scholar of profound art without pedantry, with the loftiest conceptions of beauty, whose every thought and emotion is for the glory of his art.”; died May 9, 1991

1907 - Irving (Paul) ‘Swifty’ Lazar
Hollywood talent agent to the stars: Humphrey Bogart, Cole Porter, Lillian Hellman, Ernest Hemingway; died Dec 30, 1993

1914 - Frank Lovejoy
actor: House of Wax, Strategic Air Command; died Oct 2, 1962

1914 - Edmund S. (Sixtus) Muskie
Governor of Maine [1955-1959]; U.S. Senator from Maine [1959-1980]; Democratic nominee for vice-president [1968 w/Hubert Humphrey]; Secretary of State [1980-1981]; died Mar 26, 1996

1915 - Jay Livingston
composer: To Each His Own, Mona Lisa, Tammy; died Oct 17, 2001

1919 - Vic (Victor John Angelo) Raschi
baseball: pitcher: NY Yankees [World Series: 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953/all-star: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952], SL Cardinals, KC Athletics; died Oct 14, 1988

1921 - Dirk Bogarde (Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde)
actor: The Damned, Death in Venice, The Vision, A Bridge Too Far, Night Flight from Moscow; died May 8, 1999

1923 - Thad Jones (Thaddeus Joseph Jones)
musician: trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn: played with Count Basie, Thelonious Monk; bandleader: Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra; composer: A Child is Born; died Aug 20, 1986

1924 - Freddie Bartholomew (Frederick Llewellyn March)
actor: Anna Karenina, Captains Courageous, David Copperfield, Little Lord Fauntleroy; died Jan 23, 1992

1930 - Eric Dixon
musician: saxophonist/flutist: Count Basie orchestra

1940 - Kevin Loughery
basketball: Baltimore Bullets, Miami Heat; coach: New Jersey Nets, Philadelphia 76ers Miami Heat; TV host: CNN: This Week in the NBA; columnist: CNN.com

1941 - Jim Turner
football: NY Jets kicker: Super Bowl III, Denver Broncos kicker: Super Bowl XII

1942 - Jerry Sloan
basketball: Evansville (Indiana) College, Baltimore Bullets, Chicago Bulls; coach: Chicago Bulls, Utah Jazz

1943 - Conchata Ferrell
actress: L.A. Law, Hearts Afire, A Peaceable Kingdom, McClain’s Law, Hot L Baltimore, E/R, B.J. and the Bear, The Buccaneers, True Romance, Mystic Pizza, Edward Scissorhands, Deadly Hero

1944 - Rick Barry
basketball: Golden State Warriors: NBA Playoff Record for 8 steals in a game [shared with 5 others]

1944 - Ken Howard
actor: The White Shadow, The Thorn Birds, Country Girl, Oscar

1945 - Chuck Portz
musician: bass: group: The Turtles: It Ain’t Me Babe, Let Me Be, You Baby, Happy Together, She’d Rather be with Me, Elenore, You Showed Me

1947 - Barry Miles
musician: drums, keyboards: group: Silverlight; Roberta Flack’s musical director

1948 - Sam Lacey
basketball: New Mexico State Univ., Sacramento Kings

1948 - Dianne Wiest
Academy Award-winning actress: Hannah and Her Sisters [1986]; Bullets over Broadway, Radio Days, Edward Scissorhands, Little Man Tate, Footloose

1949 - Ronnie Ray Smith
sprinter: 1968 Olympics gold medal winner: 4-by-100 meter relay [w/Charles Greene, Melvin Pender & Jim Hines]

1949 - Milan Williams
musician: keyboards, drums, trombone, guitar: group: Commodores: Machine Gun, Just to be Close to You, Sweet Love, Easy, Sail On, Three Times a Lady, Still, Nightshift

1955 - Reba (Nell) McEntire
multi Grammy, CMA, ACM Award-winning singer: How Blue, Somebody Should Leave, Who Ever’s in New England, What am I Gonna Do about You, For My Broken Heart, The Last One to Know [30 #1 singles, 14 #1 albums]; actress: Buffalo Girls, Forever Love, One Night at McCool’s; autobiography: Reba: My Story

1964 - Salt (Cheryl James)
Grammy Award-winning rap singer: duo: Salt-N-Pepa: None of Your Business [1994]; Push It, LP: Hot, Cool & Vicious.

Chart Toppers
March 28th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Be My Love - Mario Lanza
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Venus - Frankie Avalon
Tragedy - Thomas Wayne
Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
Don’t Take Your Guns to Town - Johnny Cash

1967 Happy Together - The Turtles
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Mamas & The Papas
There’s a Kind of Hush - Herman’s Hermits
I Won’t Come in While He’s There - Jim Reeves

1975 My Eyes Adored You - Frankie Valli
Lady Marmalade - LaBelle
Lovin’ You - Minnie Riperton
Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me - Culture Club
Hungry like the Wolf - Duran Duran
Swingin’ - John Anderson

1991 One More Try - Timmy -T-
Coming Out of the Dark - Gloria Estafan
This House - Tracie Spencer
Loving Blind - Clint Black


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

stringbean
03-28-2007, 01:26 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/march/28/newsid_2734000/2734499.stm

icedreams
03-28-2007, 02:28 PM
Bump :)

ShadowThomas
03-28-2007, 11:31 PM
88th day of 2007 - 277 remaining.

Thursday, March 29, 2007
THE KING AND I DAY.

The wonderful Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on Margaret Langdon’s novel, Anna and the King of Siam, opened this night in 1951 on Broadway. The King and I starred Yul Brynner in the role of the King of Siam. The king who, along with his subjects, valued tradition above all else. From this day forward, the role of the King of Siam belonged to Yul Brynner and no other.

Brynner appeared in this part in more than 4,000 performances on both stage and screen (the Broadway show was adapted for Hollywood in 1956).

Anna, the English governess hired to teach the King’s dozens of children, was portrayed by Gertrude Lawrence. Ms. Lawrence and Mr. Brynner acted, danced and sang their way into our hearts with such memorable tunes as Getting to Know You, Shall We Dance, Hello, Young Lovers, I Whistle a Happy Tune, We Kiss in a Shadow, I Have Dreamed, Something Wonderful, A Puzzlement and March of the Siamese Children.

The King and I ran for a total of 1,246 outstanding performances at New York’s St. James Theatre.

Events
March 29th.

1848 - For the first time in recorded history, Niagara Falls stopped flowing. An ice jam in the Niagara river above the rim of the falls caused the water to stop. We imagine that tours on the Maid of the Mist were canceled ... and that ticket prices were refunded.

1882 - The Knights of Columbus organization was granted a charter by the state of Connecticut. The Knights of Columbus is a Catholic, fraternal service, family organization of almost 6 million members.

1914 - Seven papers joined together to distribute the first newspaper rotogravure section. This meant that the first picture section was developed.

1917 - Man o’ War, the famous American race horse, was foaled.

1932 - Comedian Jack Benny appeared on radio for the first time. He agreed to join then newspaper columnist, Ed Sullivan, on his radio interview show. Benny got a real taste of radio two months later when he got his own show on the NBC radio network.

1937 - The radio serial, Our Gal Sunday, debuted. The question, “Can this girl from a small mining town in the West find happiness as the wife of a wealthy and titled Englishman?” was asked each day as the show continued for the next 22 years!

1951 - Actor/dancer/singer Fred Astaire was right at home in his tuxedo as he hosted the 23rd Annual Academy Awards. The big party was thrown at the RKO Pantages Theater in Los Angeles. Best Picture (of 1950) was All About Eve (“It’s all about women --- and their men!”), produced by Darryl F. Zanuck. It won six Oscars in all, including Best Supporting Actor for George Sanders, Best Director and Best Writing/Screenplay for Joseph L. Mankiewicz; Best Costume Design/Black-and-White for Edith Head and Charles Le Maire; and Best Sound/Recording (20th Century-Fox Sound Dept.). All About Eve also was nominated eight other times. The Best Actor award went to José Ferrer for Cyrano de Bergerac and the Best Actress was voted to be Judy Holliday for Born Yesterday. Best Supporting Actress was Josephine Hull for Harvey. Best Music/Song prizes were awarded to Ray Evans and Jay Livingston for the Nat King Cole classic, Mona Lisa, from Captain Carey, U.S.A..

1962 - Jack Paar left his highly successful late night TV talk show after five years. He left behind a salary of $250,000 and an estimated audience of eight-million people. Fill-in hosts were used, including one who would ultimately win the coveted position of host of The Tonight Show. He was Johnny Carson.

1967 - The first nationwide strike in the 30-year history of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) began this day, lasting for 13 days. Many familiar faces were absent from the TV screen during the strike, including that of Walter Cronkite of CBS News. A chap named Arnold Zenker, formerly a radio announcer in Wilmington, DE, got the call to fill in for Cronkite during that period. After the strike was settled, Zenker was never heard from again on network television.

1973 - After recording On the Cover of ‘Rolling Stone’, Dr. Hook finally got a group shot on the cover of Jann Wenner’s popular rock magazine. Inside, a Rolling Stone writer confirmed that members of the group (Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show) bought five copies of the mag for their moms -- just like in the song’s lyrics!

1973 - Hommy, the Puerto Rican version of the rock opera Tommy, opened in New York City. The production was staged at Carnegie Hall.

1976 - “And the Oscar goes to...” One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Saul Zaentz, Michael Douglas, producers) selected as the Best Picture of 1975. The Academy Awards were spotlighted -- for the 48th time -- at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Hosts for the gala gala were Goldie Hawn, Gene Kelly, Walter Matthau, George Segal and Robert Shaw. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest also scored the Best Director prize for Milos Forman, the Best Actor honor for Jack Nicholson and the Best Actress Oscar for Louise Fletcher, plus the Oscars for Best Writing to Bo Goldman and Lawrence Hauben. The Best Supporting Actor nod went to eighty-year-old George Burns for The Sunshine Boys and Best Supporting Actress was Lee Grant in Shampoo. The Best Music/Song winner was Keith Carradine for I’m Easy from Nashville. Other favorite winning and nominated flicks from the year 1975 include: Dog Day Afternoon which won the Oscar for Best Writing/Original Screenplay (Frank Pierson); Jaws which was awarded gold statuettes for Best Sound (Robert L. Hoyt, Roger Heman, Earl Mabery, John R. Carter), Best Film Editing (Verna Fields); and Best Music/Original Score (John Williams); The Day of the Locust; Funny Lady; and Tommy.

1982 - The oldest soap opera on network television, Search for Tomorrow, made a big change. It jumped from CBS, where it grew in popularity for 30 years, to the daytime schedule on NBC. During the change, the program, owned and sponsored by Proctor and Gamble, continued right along with the soap, going from one network to the other the following day. The company wanted to maintain its regular 12:30 p.m. time slot, but CBS had other plans for Search. NBC agreed to the 12:30 time and "Search" became an NBC property. Lots of celebs have been featured on Search for Tomorrow including: Don Knotts, Sandy Duncan, Lee Grant, Tom Ewell, Roy Scheider and Hal Linden.

1982 - Fond memories surface as we remember the 54th Annual Academy Awards, presented this day at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Talk-show host Johnny Carson acted as host for the party. Two of America’s most revered performers, Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn scored as Best Actor and Best Actress in On Golden Pond. The Best Picture (1981) and Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Colin Welland) was Chariots of Fire (David Puttnam, producer). It also won the prizes for Best Costume Design (Milena Canonero) and Best Music/Original Score (Vangelis). The Best Director Oscar went to Warren Beatty for Reds. Best Supporting Actor, John Gielgud, won for his work in Arthur. The Best Supporting Actress was Maureen Stapleton for Reds and Best Music/Song prizes went to Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, Christopher Cross and Peter Allen for Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do) from Arthur, of course. One of the night’s biggest winners (four Oscars -- Art Direction, Sound, Film Editing, Special Effects -- and four more nominations) was Raiders of the Lost Ark.

1987 - Hulk Hogan took 11 minutes, 43 seconds to pin Andre the Giant before 93,136 Wrestlemania III fans at the Silverdome in Pontiac, MI. The event was the biggest indoor sports/entertainment promotion ever. 2.5 million people watched on Pay-Per-View TV, as well.

1989 - The 61st Annual Academy Awards ceremony was presented at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. Rain Man (Mark Johnson, producer) was awarded the Best Picture Oscar with its star, Dustin Hoffman, scoring as Best Actor, Barry Levinson getting the Best Director prize, and Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow picking up the award for Best Writing/Original Screenplay. Best Actress (of all the movies of 1988) was Jodie Foster for The Accused. The Best Supporting Actor Oscar was won by Kevin Kline for A Fish Called Wanda and the Best Supporting Actress was Geena Davis in The Accidental Tourist. Carly Simon won Best Music/Song for Let the River Run from Working Girl. Other popular movies from 1988 including Oscar winners and non-winning nominees were: Dangerous Liaisons; Mississippi Burning; Big; Gorillas in the Mist; Who Framed Roger Rabbit; Beaches; Die Hard; Beetlejuice, et al.

1993 - Hollywood was all aglitter again, for the 65th Annual Academy Awards extravaganza at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Comedian/actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the fourth straight year. Clint Eastwood was honored with Best Picture and Best Director Oscars for his Unforgiven. He starred, directed and produced the gritty Western which also won an award for Best Film Editing (Joel Cox) and Best Supporting Actor (Gene Hackman). Best Actor was Al Pacino for Scent of a Woman and the Best Actress prize went to Emma Thompson for Howards End. Marisa Tomei took home the award for Best Supporting Actress for My Cousin Vinny. ’Toons winning tune awards was a popular 1990s event at the Oscars and this year was no different. Aladdin picked up two: Best Music/Song awarded to Alan Menken (music), Tim Rice (lyrics) for A Whole New World and Best Music/Original Score (Alan Menken).

Birthdays
March 29th.


1790 - John Tyler
10th U.S. President [1841-1845]; the first president to marry while in office; married to: L. Christian, J. Gardiner [8 sons, 7 daughters]; nickname: Accidental President; died Jan 18, 1862

1867 - Cy (Denton True) Young
Baseball Hall of Famer: pitcher: Cleveland Spiders [World Series: 1892, 1895, 1896], St. Louis Perfectos, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Somersets, Boston Pilgrims [World Series: 1903], Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Naps, Boston Rustlers; Cy Young Award [for best pitcher in both leagues] named for him; died Nov 4, 1955

1875 - Lou Hoover (Henry)
wife of 31st U.S. President Herbert Hoover; died Jan 7, 1944

1889 - Howard Lindsay
playwright: A Woman’s World; died Feb 11, 1968

1914 - Phil Foster (Feldman)
stand-up comedian; actor: Bang the Drum Slowly, Conquest of Space, Hail; died July 8, 1985

1918 - Pearl (Mae) Bailey
jazz singer: Takes Two to Tango, A Little Learnin’ is a Dangerous Thing [w/Sinatra]; actress: St. Louis Woman, Variety Girl, Porgy and Bess, lead in black cast of Hello Dolly; TV series; died Aug 17, 1990

1919 - Eileen Heckart
Academy Award-winning supporting actress: Butterflies are Free [1972]; The Bad Seed, Bus Stop, Butterflies are Free, Heartbreak Ridge, Up the Down Staircase; died Dec 31, 2001

1927 - John McLaughlin
TV host: McLaughlin [CNBC Network]; editor, columnist

1938 - Duane Rupp
hockey: NHL: NY Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Minnesota North Stars, Pittsburgh Penguins

1943 - Eric Idle
actor: Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Casper, Splitting Heirs, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

1944 - Denny (Dennis Dale) McLain
baseball: pitcher: Detroit Tigers: [all-star: 1966, 1968, 1969/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1968/Cy Young Award: 1968/World Series: 1968], Washington Senators, Atlanta Braves, Oakland Athletics; entertainer

1945 - Walt ‘Clyde’ Frazier
Basketball Hall of Famer: Southern Illinois Univ. All-American; NY Knicks [1967-1977/NBA championship teams: 1970, 1973/NBA all defensive first team: 1969-1975/all-star: 1970-1976/MVP: 1975], Knicks’ all-time assists leader: 4,791; Cleveland Cavaliers; lifetime average of 18.9 points per game in 825 regular-season games, 20.7 points per game in 93 playoff contests; nickname [Clyde] taken from the folk-hero robber Clyde Barrow

1947 - Bobby Kimball (Toteaux)
singer: group: Toto: Africa, Rosanna

1948 - Ken Burrow
football: San Diego State Univ., Atlanta Falcons, Oakland Raiders

1948 - Bud Cort
actor: Harold and Maude, Brewster McCloud, M*A*S*H

1949 - Michael Brecker
jazz musician: reeds, group: The Brecker Brothers

1950 - Ed Ratleff
basketball: Long Beach State Univ., 1972 Olympics USA Men’s Basketball Team, Houston Rockets

1953 - Tom (Thomas Hubert) Hume
baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Reds [all-star: 1982], Philadelphia Phillies

1955 - Earl Campbell
Pro Football Hall of Famer: Heisman Trophy winner: [Univ. of Texas: 1977], Texas All-American, Houston Oilers [1978-1984], New Orleans Saints [1984-1985]; career-high 1,934 yards rushing, including four 200-yard rushing games [1980], career stats: 9,407 yards, 74 TDs rushing, 121 receptions, 806 yards, played in five Pro Bowls

1956 - Kurt Thomas
gymnast: 1st American male to win a world champion gymnastics event since 1932 [floor exercise - 1978, 1979]; Sullivan Award-winner [1979]; TV sports commentator; operates a gymnastics school

1957 - Christopher Lambert
actor: Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes, To Kill a Priest

1963 - M.C. Hammer (Stanley Kirk Burrell)
Grammy Award-winning singer: U Can’t Touch This [1990], Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ’Em: The Movie [1990]; Ring ’Em, Adam’s Groove [Addams Family Theme]; dancer, actor: Amen

1976 - Jennifer Capriati
tennis champion: Olympic gold-medalist [1992], Wimbledon [1990]

Chart Toppers
March 29th.


1944 Besame Mucho - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Bob Eberly & Kitty
Kallen
Mairzy Doats - The Merry Macs
Poinciana - Bing Crosby
So Long Pal - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Please, Mr. Sun - Johnnie Ray
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Wild One - Bobby Rydell
Puppy Love - Paul Anka
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay - Otis Redding
Love is Blue - Paul Mauriat
La - La - Means I Love You - The Delfonics
A World of Our Own - Sonny James

1976 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night) - The Four Seasons
Dream Weaver - Gary Wright
Lonely Night (Angel Face) - Captain & Tennille
Til the Rivers All Run Dry - Don Williams

1984 Jump - Van Halen
Somebody’s Watching Me - Rockwell
Footloose - Kenny Loggins
Roll On (Eighteen Wheeler) - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread. Thanks. :)

icedreams
03-28-2007, 11:43 PM
Thnx Shadow :)

ShadowThomas
03-29-2007, 12:44 AM
Thnx Shadow :)
Your welcome, Ann. :)

ShadowThomas
03-29-2007, 11:22 PM
89th day of 2007 - 276 remaining.

Friday, March 30, 2007
DOCTOR, DOCTOR DAY. :D

From this day on, surgery would no longer painful -- at least, while it was being performed. Dr. Crawford W. Long performed the first operation while a patient was anesthetized by ether on this day in 1842 as he removed a tumor from the neck of a boy.

Crawford had been observing several party-goers under the influence of nitrous oxide and sulfuric ether. Those folks were feeling no pain. And Crawford’s patient literally felt no pain as the good doctor removed a tumor from the man’s neck using the party concoction.

This event has been celebrated as Doctors’ Day since this day in 1933. The idea of setting aside a day to honor physicians was conceived by Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond. Doctors throughout the United States celebrate in Dr. Crawford W. Long’s honor and, in honor of ether as an anesthetic.

Give a doctor a red carnation today. It’s the official, designated flower of Doctors’ Day.

Events
March 30th.

1858 - Hyman L. Lipman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania patented the writing device we call the pencil. Yes, it did have an attached eraser as well. Why, then, we wondered, wasn’t it called the Lipman? “Teacher, I’m sorry, but I seem to have forgotten my Lipman this morning.” Or -- “May I please go and sharpen my Lipman?” See? It works.

1867 - Alaska was purchased from Russia for two-cents an acre! Now that’s called getting your two-cents worth...

1909 - The Queensboro Bridge, the first double-decker bridge, opened in New York City.

1923 - The Audubon Ballroom in New York City was the scene of the first dance marathon. Alma Cummings danced the fox trot, one-step and waltz with half a dozen partners. It is not known who or how many survived...

1936 - The radio serial, Backstage Wife, made a move across the radio dial from the Mutual Broadcasting System to NBC radio. Once there, the program continued to air for the next 23 years.

1945 - The Dreft Star Playhouse was heard for the final time on radio. The show had been paying up to $3,000 per week to attract ‘name’ talent. Dreft, the show’s sponsor, was a popular laundry soap of the time.

1946 - Academy Award was heard on radio for the first time. The first dramatized story was titled, Jezebel and starred actress Bette Davis.

1948 - Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin ordered all road and rail access to Berlin, Germany blocked. This was just the beginning of what would become a complete blockade of the German city three months later ... on June 24.

1955 - Brando, Kelly, O’Brien, Saint, Kazan. These were the names the 27th Academy Awards were made of. And all of the other big names of Hollywood gathered at the RKO Pantages Theater in Los Angeles to honor these stars and the motion pictures of 1954 including The Caine Mutiny, The High and the Mighty; A Star is Born; The Glenn Miller Story; Rear Window; Sabrina; 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Actor/comedian Bob Hope and actress Thelma Ritter (in New York City) hosted. On the Waterfront (Sam Spiegel, producer) won Oscars for Best Picture, Director (Elia Kazan), Actor (Marlon Brando), Supporting Actress (Eva Marie Saint) and more (art direction, cinematography, film editing, writing). Grace Kelly was voted Best Actress for The Country Girl (“How far should a woman go...to redeem the man she loves?”). Best Supporting Actor was Edmond O’Brien for The Barefoot Contessa and Best Music/Song Oscars went to Jule Styne (music), Sammy Cahn (lyrics) for Three Coins in the Fountain from the flick of the same name.

1963 - The Chiffons began a four-week stay at the top of the pop music charts as their hit single, He’s So Fine, became number one. The song stayed at the top of the top tune tabulation until Little Peggy March came along with I Will Follow Him on April 27th.

1964 - “This ... is ... ‘Jeopardy’!” One of television’s best known game shows, Jeopardy, developed by Merv Griffin, aired on NBC-TV for the first time on this day. Your category: Game Show Hosts: for 200 points. This host never missed one show in 2,500 programs. “Um, who is Art Fleming?” Right you are!

1970 - Lauren Bacall starred in Applause which opened on Broadway. The show became one of the hardest tickets to get on the Great White Way. Critics called Bacall “a sensation.” The play, at the Palace Theatre, was an adaptation of the film, All About Eve. It continued for 896 performances. A London version of the show, also starring Bacall, opened in 1972.

1970 - Television dramas were added to the daytime lineups of both ABC and NBC. The Best of Everything was first seen on ABC as was A World Apart. On NBC, the dramas, Somerset and Another World, debuted.

1970 - Secretariat, the great race horse that went on to win the Triple Crown of horse racing in 1973, was foaled.

1971 - The Bee Gees received a gold record for the single, Lonely Days. When playing it, they heard the song at a faster speed and said, “Hey, this sounds like disco!” and the rest was Saturday Night Fever music history...

1974 - John Denver reached the top spot on the music charts with his hit, Sunshine on My Shoulders. It was the singer’s first number one song. Three other singles by Denver reached the top of the music world: Annie’s Song, Thank God I’m a Country Boy and I’m Sorry. Take Me Home Country Roads made it to the number two position, while Rocky Mountain High just cracked the Top 10 at number 9. Denver wrote Leaving on a Jet Plane for Peter, Paul and Mary and won an Emmy for the TV special, An Evening With John Denver. Once again, I’m Casey Kasem in Hollywood. Keep those feet on the ground. Keep reaching for the stars...

1978 - Ellen Corby returned to Walton’s Mountain more than a year after she left in an ambulance, the victim of a stroke. The episode was called, Grandma Comes Home.

1981 - U.S. President Ronald Reagan was shot in the chest by a would-be assassin as the President walked to his limousine in Washington DC. Press Secretary James Brady and two police officers were also wounded in the attack. John W. Hinkley, Jr. was convicted of the crime.

1983 - Basketball player Larry Bird of the Boston Celtics set a regular season Celtic scoring record as he pumped in 53 points. The record stayed intact until 1985 when Bird broke his own record with a 60-point performance on March 12.

1987 - Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers brought $39.85 million -- more than triple the record for an auctioned painting. The sale was on the 134th anniversary of the birth of the artist. Singer Don McLean wrote and sang a musical tribute to this artistic genius, titled Vincent, in April of 1972.

1987 - The 59th Annual Academy Awards extravaganza emanated from the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Los Angeles Music Center. Chevy Chase, Goldie Hawn and Paul ‘Crocodile Dundee’ Hogan hosted. (Hogan was also an Oscar nominee for Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen with Ken Shadie and John Cornell for Crocodile Dundee.) Now let’s get right to the good part: Best Picture: Platoon (Arnold Kopelson, producer); Best Director: Oliver Stone for Platoon; Best Actor: Paul Newman for The Color of Money; Best Actress: Marlee Matlin for Children of a Lesser God; Best Supporting Actor: Michael Caine for Hannah and Her Sisters; Best Supporting Actress: Dianne Wiest for Hannah and Her Sisters and Best Music/Song: Giorgio Moroder (music), Tom Whitlock (lyrics) for Take My Breath Away from Top Gun. And HBO (Home Box Office) earned its first Oscar as Down and Out in America tied for Best Documentary feature. The cable-TV film played in a Los Angeles movie theatre for one week to qualify for the Academy Award. Now, stay tuned for your local news...

1992 - The 64th annual Academy Awards statuette-passing-out-party was thrown at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Funny man and actor/producer/writer/director Billy Crystal was host as that creepy The Silence of the Lambs (Edward Saxon, Kenneth Utt, Ronald M. Bozman, producers) won the prize for Best Picture of 1991. Silence also won the Best Director Oscar for the creepy Jonathan Demme; Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for the creepy Ted Tally; Best Actor for the creepy Anthony Hopkins and Best Actress for the anything-but-creepy Jodie Foster. Jack Palance won Best Supporting Actor for playing Curly in City Slickers and the Best Supporting Actress Oscar was claimed by Mercedes Ruehl for The Fisher King. Best Music/Song: Alan Menken (music), Howard Ashman (lyrics) for Beauty and the Beast from, you guessed it, Beauty and the Beast. You probably wouldn’t have guessed that the movie, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, nominated in six categories, won four Oscars for Best Sound (Tom Johnson, Gary Rydstrom, Gary Summers, Lee Orloff); Best Effects/Sound Effects Editing (Gary Rydstrom, Gloria S. Borders); Best Effects/Visual Effects (Dennis Muren, Stan Winston, Gene Warren Jr., Robert Skotak); and Best Makeup (Stan Winston, Jeff Dawn). 1991 was definitely a creepy movie year!

Birthdays
March 30th.

1746 - Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes
artist: The Caprices, The Family of Charles IV, Majas, The 2nd of May, The 3rd of May; died Apr 18, 1828

1853 - Vincent van Gogh
post-impressionist artist: The Potato Eaters, Sunflowers, The Night Cafe; died July 29, 1890

1880 - Sean O’Casey
playwright: Harvest Festival, The Plough and the Stars, Juno and the Pay****, Shadow of a Gunman, The Plough and the Stars; died Sep 18, 1964

1900 - Ted (Edward) Heath
musician: trombone, bandleader: played big band concerts every Sunday at the Palladium in the 1940s and 1950s; died Nov 18, 1969

1913 - Frankie Laine (Frank Paul LoVecchio)
singer: That’s My Desire, Mule Train, That Lucky Old Sun, The Cry of the Wild Goose, Jezebel, High Noon [Do Not Forsake Me], Moonlight Gambler, Love is a Golden Ring, I Believe; died Feb 6, 2007

1919 - McGeorge Bundy
president of the Ford Foundation; Special Assistant for National Security Affairs under U.S. Presidents Kennedy and Johnson; died Sep 16, 1996

1929 - Richard Dysart
actor: L.A. Law, Wall Street, Back to the Future 3, The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, The Day of the Locust, Pale Rider, The Terminal Man, Wall Street

1930 - John Astin
actor: The Addams Family, The Pruitts of Southampton, Operation Petticoat, Night Court, I’m Dickens, He’s Fenster, The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., National Lampoon’s European Vacation

1930 - Peter Marshall (Pierre La****)
TV host: Hollywood Squares

1937 - Warren Beatty (Henry Warren Beaty)
actor: Splendor in the Grass, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, Bonnie and Clyde, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Parallax View, Shampoo, Heaven Can Wait, Reds, Dick Tracy, Bulworth, Town and Country; Academy Award-winning director: Reds [1981]; Heaven Can Wait, Dick Tracy, Bulworth; Irving G. Thalberg Memorial [Academy] Award [2000]

1940 - Jerry Lucas
Basketball Hall of Famer: Ohio State Univ. [NCAA Championship: 1960]; U.S. Olympic Team [1960], Cincinnati Royals [NBA Rookie of the Year: 1963-64], San Francisco Warriors, New York Knicks [NBA championship: 1973]; participated in seven NBA All-Star Games [1964-69, 1971]; NBA career record of 10,000+ points and 10,000+ rebounds

1941 - Graeme Edge
musician: drums: group: The Moody Blues: Nights in White Satin, LP: Kick Off Your Muddy Boots, Long Distance Voyager

1942 - Bobby Wright
country artist: Lay a Little Happiness on Me, Here I Go Again

1945 - Eric Clapton (Eric Patrick Clapp)
rock guitarist: group: Yardbirds: For Your Love; song writer: Layla, score for The Hit; Grammy Award-winning singer: Bad Love [1990], LPs: Tears from Heaven and Unplugged [1993], I Shot the Sheriff, Lay Down Sally, Promises, I Can’t Stand It, Wonderful Tonight

1950 - LaRue Martin
basketball: Loyola Univ., Portland Trail Blazers

1957 - Paul Reiser
comedian, actor: Diner, Mad About You, Aliens, Beverly Hills Cop

1964 - Tracy Chapman
Grammy Award-winning folk, pop singer-songwriter: Fast Car [1989], Give Me One Reason [1997]

1964 - Ian Ziering
actor: Beverly Hills 90210, The Fighter.

Chart Toppers
March 30th.

1945 My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Pied Pipers
A Little on the Lonely Side - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Paul
Allen)
Accentuate the Positive - Johnny Mercer
Shame on You - Spade Cooley

1953 Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
Don’t Let the Stars Get in Your Eyes - Perry Como
Pretend - Nat King Cole
Kaw-Liga - Hank Williams

1961 Surrender - Elvis Presley
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Shirelles
Apache - Jorgen Ingmann
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Dizzy - Tommy Roe
Traces - Classics IV featuring Dennis Yost
Time of the Season - The Zombies
Who’s Gonna Mow Your Grass - Buck Owens

1977 Rich Girl - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Dancing Queen - Abba
Don’t Give Up on Us - David Soul
Southern Nights - Glen Campbell

1985 One More Night - Phil Collins
Lovergirl - Teena Marie
We are the World - USA for Africa
Seven Spanish Angels - Ray Charles with Willie Nelson


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

mdexter2
03-30-2007, 01:04 PM
Hello. Bump. :)

Yes, how may I help you? What do you want/need today? Keep it clean now Shadowman, okay?! :D

icedreams
03-30-2007, 10:23 PM
http://i7.tinypic.com/4h8pe6e.gif

mdexter2
03-30-2007, 10:28 PM
http://i7.tinypic.com/4h8pe6e.gif
That's cute! :D

ShadowThomas
03-30-2007, 11:06 PM
90th day of 2007 - 275 remaining.

Saturday, March 31, 2007
EIFFEL TOWER DAY.

To the City of Lights we go, down the beautiful streets of Paris, under the Arc de Triumphe and there, before us, the site of one of the world’s most photographed and well-known landmarks, the Eiffel Tower.

It was on this day in 1889 that the structure opened in Gay Paree. A beautiful sight, no? Well, not so to writers, Guy deMaupassant and Alexandre Dumas, who condemned the Eiffel Tower as a “horrid nightmare.” Well, no pleasing some people, we guess...

The Eiffel Tower was named after its designer, architect, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel who built the structure for the Paris Exhibition of 1889.

Events
March 31st.

1880 - The first electric street lights ever installed by a municipality were turned on in beautiful Wabash, IN.

1900 - The W.E. Roach Company was the first automobile company to advertise in a national magazine. One couldn’t miss their advertising slogan, “Automobiles that give satisfaction!” The car company advertised in the Saturday Evening Post.

1918 - Daylight saving time went into effect throughout the United States for the first time. Folks would spring ahead an hour allowing for longer early evenings. The time change left enough light for many activities, especially in farming areas. Planting and such could best be done with the sun up an extra hour. And, of course, folks would fall back an hour to standard time in the fall.

1937 - Phil Harris recorded one of his best-known songs in Los Angeles, CA. That’s What I Like About the South was recorded on a 78 RPM disk. Harris would move to TV stardom and continue as a popular vocalist during the 1950s with such hit songs as The Thing. We wonder if he ever got rid of that “boom-ba-boom”...

1943 - The show, Away We Go, was renamed. Never heard of it? We think you may have. The show opened at the St. James Theatre in New York City and, thanks to the talents of stars like Alfred Drake, Joan Roberts and Howard DeSilva, it became an instant hit. The show ran for 2,248 performances -- until 1948. The musical, which has grossed millions of dollars on stage and as a blockbuster movie was initially produced for the sum of $75,000. It is still legendary among musical productions -- especially after it was retitled Oklahoma! Now you know ... the rest of the story!

1945 - Tennessee Williams’ play, The Glass Menagerie, arrived on Broadway in New York City to become what critics and the public called the best play of the year.

1953 - Cavalcade of America was heard for the final time on network radio. It had been the longest-running show of its kind. Cavalcade of America presented dramatized events in American history for 18 years.

1968 - Tony Jacklin became the first Englishman to win a modern-day U.S. golf tournament when he won the Greater Jacksonville Open.

1970 - A bankruptcy referee granted the owner of the Seattle Pilots permission to sell the major-league baseball franchise to investors in Milwaukee, WI. The Pilots became the Milwaukee Brewers because the Milwaukee Braves had decided to move to Atlanta. Seattle then landed another American League franchise, the Mariners, sometime later -- producing a league champion in 1995. Incidentally, does a bankruptcy referee wear a striped shirt and use a whistle?

1972 - Swimmer Mark Spitz was presented the Amateur Athletic Union’s coveted Sullivan Award as the outstanding amateur athlete of 1971. Spitz went on to Olympic heroics a few months later, winning seven gold medals.

1973 - Ken Norton defeated Muhammad Ali in a 12-round split decision. Ali had his jaw broken during the fight.

1981 - Ordinary People (Ronald L. Schwary, producer) won four Academy Awards at the 53rd Oscar ceremonies. Johnny Carson hosted the show from the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Oscars were presented to a lot of ordinary people, like Tess and Melvin and Howard. However, it was the Best Picture, Ordinary People, that also won for Best Director (Robert Redford), Best Supporting Actor (Timothy Hutton) and Best Writing (screenplay based on material from another medium: Alvin Sargent). Best Actor that year was Robert De Niro for Raging Bull and the Best Actress was Sissy Spacek for Coal Miner’s Daughter. The Best Supporting Actress prize went to Mary Steenburgen for Melvin and Howard and Best Music/Song Oscars were awarded to Michael Gore (music) and Dean Pitchford (lyrics) for Fame from, uh, Fame.

1985 - A reunion of stars lit up Beverly Hills, California, as ABC-TV celebrated the 200th episode of The Love Boat. The network also honored the 1,000th guest star: Lana Turner. She was joined by Mary Martin, who was the 700th guest star to set sail on the show. Ginger Rogers was the 300th, Robert Guillaume #500 and we could go on but we won’t. The Love Boat had as a crew: Captain Merrill Stubing (Gavin MacLeod), Dr. Adam Bricker (Bernie Kopell), Yeoman-Purser Burl ‘Gopher’ Smith (Fred Grandy, who went on to become a U.S. Congressman), Bartender Isaac Washington (Ted Lange) and Photographer Ashley Covington Evans (Ted McGinley). Singer Jack Jones provided the vocal to the opening theme song and Ernie Anderson was the distinctive voice for the millions of network promos before each show.

Birthdays
March 31st.

1596 - Rene Descartes
‘Father of modern philosophy’: “I think, therefore I am.”; died Feb 11, 1650

1621 - Andrew Marvell
poet: To His Coy Mistress; died Aug 16, 1678

1809 - Edward Fitzgerald
author: translated Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat; died June 14, 1883

1809 - Nikolai Gogol
playwright, novelist: Dead Souls; died Mar 4, 1852

1823 - Mary Chestnut
author: A Diary from Dixie; died in 1886

1915 - Henry Morgan (Henry Lerner Von Ost, Jr.)
comedian: TV panel shows: I’ve Got a Secret; died May 19, 1994

1918 - Tommy Bolt
golf champion: U.S. Open [1958]

1922 - Richard (Paul) Kiley
Emmy Award-winning actor: The Thorn Birds [1983]; Blackboard Jungle, The Bad Seed, Looking for Mr. Goodbar; died Mar 5, 1999

1927 - Cesar Chavez
labor leader: started the National Farm Workers Association, organizing migrant farm workers; died Apr 23, 1993

1927 - William Daniels
Emmy Award-winning actor: St. Elsewhere; voice of Kitt on Knight Rider, The Graduate, Oh God!, Reds

1928 - Gordie (Gordon) Howe
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Detroit Red Wings [Hart Memorial Trophy: 1952, 1953, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1963], Hartford Whalers

1928 - Lefty (William Orville) Frizzell
Country Music Hall of Famer: If You’ve Got the Money, I’ve Got the Time, Always Late, Saginaw Michigan; died July 19, 1975

1929 - Liz Claiborne
fashion designer

1931 - Miller Barber
golf champion: holds record for most wins in the Senior PGA Tour [24] from 1981 to 1992

1932 - John Jakes
author: California Gold, In the Big Country

1934 - Shirley Jones
singer, actress: Carousel, The Music Man, Oklahoma!, Elmer Gantry, The Partridge Family

1935 - Herb Alpert
bandleader: Tijuana Brass: The Lonely Bull, Taste of Honey, The Work Song, This Guy’s in Love with You, Rise; record company executive: the "A" of A&M Records

1935 - Richard Chamberlain
actor: Dr. Kildare, The Thorn Birds; Centennial, Shogun, The Towering Inferno, Julius Caesar, The Madwoman of Chaillot, The Bourne Identity, King Solomon’s Mines; environmentalist in Hawaii

1938 - Bill Hicke
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, NY Rangers, Minnesota Rangers, Baltimore Clippers, Oakland Seals, California Golden Seals, Pittsburgh Penguins

1943 - Christopher Walken (Ronald Walken)
actor: The Deerhunter, Batman Returns, Wayne’s World 2, Pulp Fiction

1944 - Rod Allen (Rodney Bainbridge)
musician: bass, singer: group: The Fortunes: You’ve Got Your Troubles

1944 - Mick Ralphs
musician: guitar: groups: Mott The Hoople: All the Young Dudes, Bad Company: Can’t Get Enough, Ready for Love, Feel like Makin’ Love

1945 - Gabe (Gabriel) Kaplan
actor, comedian: Welcome Back Kotter, The Hoboken Chicken Emergency, Nobody’s Perfekt

1946 - Al Nichol
musician: guitar, keyboards: group: The Turtles: It Ain’t Me Babe, Let Me Be, You Baby, Happy Together, She’d Rather Be with Me, Elenore, You Showed Me

1948 - Dwight David Eisenhower II
lawyer, author: Eisenhower at War; grandson of 34th U.S. President [Dwight D. Eisenhower]; married Julie Nixon, daughter of 37th U.S. President [Richard Nixon]

1948 - Al Gore (Albert Arnold Gore Jr.)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee [1985-1993]; 45th U.S. Vice President [under Bill Clinton 1993-2000]

1948 - Rhea Perlman
Emmy Award-winning actress: Cheers [1983-84, 1984-85, 1985-86, 1988-89]; Pearl, Carwash, Ratings Game, Class Act, Ted & Venus, Intimate Strangers

1950 - Ed Marinaro
football: Minnesota Vikings running back: Super Bowl VIII, IX; actor: Hill Street Blues, Sisters, Dancing with Danger

1953 - Sean Hopper
musician: keyboards, singer: groups: Clover; Huey Lewis and The News: Do You Believe in Love, Heart and Soul, I Want a New Drug, The Heart of Rock & Roll, Walking on a Thin Line, Bad is Bad, If This is It, Power of Love, Trouble in Paradise

1957 - Marc McClure
actor: Freaky Friday, Back to the Future series, Superman series, Apollo 13, That Thing You Do!

1959 - Angus Young
musician: guitar: group: AC/DC: LPs: Let There be Rock, Powerage, Highway to Hell, Back in Black, Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, For Those about to Rock, Fly on the Wall.

Chart Toppers
March 31st.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Day by Day - Frank Sinatra
Personality - Johnny Mercer
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Make Love to Me! - Jo Stafford
Wanted - Perry Como
Answer Me, My Love - Nat ‘King’ Cole
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Don’t Break the Heart that Loves You - Connie Francis
Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares
Dream Baby - Roy Orbison
She’s Got You - Patsy Cline

1970 Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel
Let It Be - The Beatles
Instant Karma (We All Shine On) - John Ono Lennon
The Fightin’ Side of Me - Merle Haggard

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys - Waylon &
Willie

1986 Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. - John Cougar Mellencamp
Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Don’t Underestimate My Love for You - Lee Greenwood


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

icedreams
03-31-2007, 10:12 PM
Bump for some good reading :)

ShadowThomas
03-31-2007, 11:39 PM
91st day of 2007 - 274 remaining.

Sunday, April 1, 2007
APRIL FOOLS’ DAY. :D

Or is it All Fools’ Day? One of the first reportings of All Fools’ Day was in Poor Robin’s Almanack (no, not Poor Richard; but Poor Robin) in 1760. Poor Robin said, “The first of April, some do say, is set apart for All Fools’ Day, but why the people call it so, nor I nor they themselves do know.”

What is an April Fool? Someone who you trick into doing or saying something ludicrous, nonsensical, or fake. In other words, someone you make out to be a fool.

Since this is pretty ludicrous, and you’re reading it on this April Fools’ Day, could it be that you’re an April Fool?

Events
April 1st.

1826 - Samuel Morey of Oxford, New Hampshire patented the internal combustion engine. It was pretty much the kind of engine we still use in cars and trucks, but not as complicated and needing less maintenance than those of today. That’s what we call progress.

1864 - The first travel accident policy was issued. The Travelers Insurance Company (the company with the red umbrella as a logo, remember?) issued the policy to James Batterson, who also received the first general insurance policy issued by the firm in July, 1864.

1930 - Leo Hartnett of the Chicago Cubs broke the altitude record for a catch by catching a baseball dropped from the Goodyear blimp 800 feet over Los Angeles, CA. He caught the ball cleanly, saying, “Eeeeeeeeeeeeeooooooooooowwwwwwww!” for posterity. Hartnett reportedly broke something else as well, this day ... his jaw. When catching the ball, the force shattered his jawbone. Please, do not try this stunt at home.

1931 - Pitcher Jackie Mitchell was signed by the Chattanooga Baseball Club. Yeah? So? Well, Mitchell was the first woman in organized baseball. Miss Mitchell was 19 years old. So there...

1949 - The first all-black-cast variety show was presented on WENR-TV in Chicago, IL. The show was called Happy Pappy.

1955 - One Man’s Family was seen on TV for the final time after a six-year stay on NBC-TV. The longtime popular radio show of the same name continued until 1959.

1956 - Chet Huntley began his successful news career with NBC. He started as a reporter and analyst of the Sunday news series, Outlook. Soon, he would be teamed with David Brinkley for election coverage. The duo would click and become coanchors of The Huntley-Brinkley Report nightly on NBC with Huntley presenting news from the New York studio while Brinkley reported from Washington, DC. John Chancellor, who would become the sole anchor of the NBC Nightly News years later, was also a part of the broadcast giving comment and analysis on the day’s top news. Huntley and Brinkley closed each news broadcast with the trademark, “Good night Chet. Good night David. And good night from NBC News.”

1957 - All of Great Britain was fooled this April Fool’s Day by England’s famous newscaster, Richard Dimbleby. The newscaster, wrapping up the day’s news on Panorama, the BBC’s current affairs program, reported about the “spring spaghetti crop in southern Switzerland.” The filmed report showed the spaghetti (some ten pounds of the stuff) being picked from a tree. Many Brits believed him, by Jove! One member of our staff remembers doing something similar by asking radio listeners to “send us $100 and we’ll send you 25 words or less.”

1960 - The first U.S. weather satellite was launched. TIROS I was put into orbit and soon meteorologists saw the first pictures of a midlatitude cyclone over the northeastern United States. Other, more powerful satellites launched since then provide pictures and more exact climatological data.

1963 - The daily TV serial, General Hospital, began its long and popular run on ABC-TV. Not to be left on the operating table alone, NBC-TV countered with its popular program, The Doctors.

1985 - George Plimpton played an April Fool’s joke on readers of Sports Illustrated this day. No, he didn’t appear as a Pam Anderson look-a-like in the swimsuit issue, he went a step further. Plimpton introduced the entire nation to Sidd Finch, a 28-year-old aspiring monk, who could throw a 168 MPH fastball! Whoa! Finch was said to be a free-agent pitcher in the New York Mets’ spring training camp; that he had learned the art of the pitch while playing the French horn in his spare time. Hmmm. Plimpton later admitted that Finch was the figment of a most active imagination. No such person existed. Still doesn’t.

1985 - Unranked Villanova defeated top-rated Georgetown 66-64 to win the NCAA basketball championship, ending the Hoya’s hopes for back-to-back wins.

1985 - The long-awaited album, We Are the World, was finally released. Eight rock stars donated previously unreleased material for the LP. Three-million copies of the award-winning single of the same name had already been sold. The song, We Are the World, was number five, and moving up, on the Billboard magazine pop single’s chart this day.

1987 - Steve Newman became the first man to walk solo around the world. No foolin’! The 15,000-mile trek took him four years and untold pairs of shoes to complete. His first words after completing the journey, “Man, my dogs are achin’!”

Birthdays
April 1st.


1873 - Sergei Rachmaninoff
musician: pianist, composer: Prelude in C Sharp Minor, Second Piano Concerto; died March 28, 1943

1883 - Lon (Leonidas F.) Chaney
actor: The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Bushwackers, The Phantom of the Opera, The Unholy Three, He Who Gets Slapped, Oliver Twist, West of Zanzibar, The Horror of it All; died Aug 26, 1930

1885 - Wallace (Fitzgerald) Beery
Academy Award-winning actor: The Champ [1931-1932], Grand Hotel, We’re in the Navy Now, Treasure Island, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, The Last of the Mohicans, China Seas; died Apr 15, 1949

1915 - Art Lund
singer: Mamselle, actor: The Most Happy Fella, Donnybrook, Black Caesar, Bucktown, The Last American Hero; died May 31, 1990

1920 - Toshiro Mifune
actor: Shadow of the Wolf, Shogun, Winter Kills, 1941, Midway, Paper Tiger, Red Sun, The Bad Sleep Well, Throne of Blood, Samurai series, Rashomon, Drunken Angel; died Dec 24, 1997

1922 - William Manchester
writer: The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill, American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur, 1880-1964, A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance Portrait of an Age

1928 - George Grizzard
actor: Advise and Consent, Bachelor Party, False Witness, The Stranger Within, Scarlett

1929 - Jane Powell (Suzanne Burce)
actress: Deep in My Heart, Hit the Deck, Small Town Girl, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

1932 - Gordon Jump
actor: WKRP in Cincinnati, Sister Kate, Growing Pains, Bitter Vengeance, Ransom Money, Making the Grade, Dirkham Detective Agency; died Sep 22, 2003

1932 - Debbie Reynolds (Mary Frances Reynolds)
actress: Singin’ in the Rain, Tammy and the Bachelor, The Tender Trap, The Unsinkable Molly Brown; singer: Tammy, A Very Special Love; mother of actress, Carrie Fisher

1934 - Jim Ed (James Edward) Brown
singer: group: The Browns: The Three Bells, Scarlet Ribbons; solo: Morning; CMA Country Duo of the Year [w/Helen Cornelius - 1977]: I Don’t Want to Have to Marry You

1936 - Ron (Ronald Peter) Perranoski
baseball: pitcher: LA Dodgers [World Series: 1963, 1965, 1966], Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, California Angels; pitching coach: LA Dodgers [1981], SF Giants [1994]

1938 - Ali (Alice) MacGraw
actress: Goodbye Columbus, Love Story, The Getaway, The Winds of War

1939 - Rudolph Isley
singer: group: The Isley Brothers: Shout, Twist & Shout, It’s Your Thing, This Old Heart of Mine

1939 - Phil (Philip Henry) Niekro
baseball: pitcher: Milwaukee Braves, Atlanta Braves [all-star: 1969, 1975, 1978, 1982], NY Yankees [all-star: 1984], Cleveland Indians, Toronto Blue Jays

1941 - Guy Trottier
hockey: NHL: NY Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs

1942 - Alan Blakley
musician: guitar: group: Brian Poole and The Tremeloes: Twist and Shout, Do You Love Me, Someone Someone, Silence is Golden

1942 - Phil Margo
singer: group: The Tokens: The Lion Sleeps Tonight, Tonight I Fell in Love; Cross Country: In the Midnight Hour

1944 - Rusty (Daniel Joseph) Staub
baseball: Houston Colt .45’s, Houston Astros, Montreal Expos, NY Mets, Detroit Tigers, Texas Rangers; restaurateur

1945 - Johny Barbata
musician: drums: groups: The Turtles: Happy Together, It Ain’t Me Babe, Let Me Be, You Baby, She’d Rather Be with Me, You Showed Me, Elenore; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young; Jefferson Starship: LP: Dragonfly, Red Octopus, Spitfire, Earth; Miracles, We Built This City, Sara, Tomorrow Doesn’t Matter Tonight, Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now

1947 - Norm Van Lier
basketball: Cincinnati Royals, Chicago Bulls

1948 - Willie (Guillermo Naranjo) Montanez
baseball:California Angels, Philadelphia Phillies, SF Giants, Atlanta Braves [all-star: 1977], NY Mets, Texas Rangers, Montreal Expos, SD Padres, Pittsburgh Pirates

1948 - Doug Sutherland
football: Minnesota Vikings defensive tackle: Super Bowl VIII, IX, XI

1950 - Billy Currie
musician: synthesizer, keyboards, violin: group: Ultravox: Vienna, All Stood Still, The Thin Wall, The Voice

1952 - Annette O’Toole (Toole)
actress: Imaginary Crimes, Love Matters, White Lie, Broken Vows, Superman III, 48 Hrs., Cat People, Smile

1956 - Libby Riddles
dogsled racer: 1st woman to win Iditarod [1985]

1961 - Mark White
musician: guitar: group: ABC: Tears are Not Enough, Poison Arrow, Be Near Me, When Smokey Sings, King Without a Crown.

Chart Toppers
April 1st.

1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
How are Things in Glocca Morra - Buddy Clark
Managua, Nicaragua - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Don
Rodney)
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Dance with Me Henry (Wallflower) - Georgia Gibbs
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
South Street - The Orlons
Rhythm of the Rain - The Cascades
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Me and Bobby McGee - Janis Joplin
Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me) - The Temptations
Proud Mary - Ike & Tina Turner
After the Fire is Gone - Conway Twitty & Loretta Lynn

1979 Tragedy - Bee Gees
What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Sultans of Swing - Dire Straits
I Just Fall in Love Again - Anne Murray

1987 Lean on Me - Club Nouveau
Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
Tonight, Tonight, Tonight - Genesis
Small Town Girl - Steve Wariner


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-01-2007, 10:18 PM
For those who frequent this thread to read, Today in history. I have to start a little early tonight as well as to also include Tuesdays early. Just don't want you to think I flipped my lid. :D I have to meet up early Monday morning with a oral surgeon to have 4 big pain in the azz teeth removed. :eek: I don't think I will feel much up to posting Monday night, but didn't want you to think I jumped ship on this thread.
So, hopefully, Tuesday night I can get back on track here. ;)

92nd day of 2007 - 273 remaining.

Monday, April 2, 2007
UGLY DUCKLING DAY.

Denmark’s most famous author, Hans Christian Andersen, was born on this day in 1805. His life was a true tale of the boy who went from rags to riches. He was born to a poor family; his father, a shoemaker, died when Hans was 11 years old. When he was just 14, Hans left his hometown of Odense, Denmark and traveled to Copenhagen where he, literally, became a starving artist (actor, singer, dancer). It was there that he met the man who became his lifelong friend and benefactor, Jonas Collin. With Collin’s help, Andersen received a royal scholarship and completed his education.

By his 25th birthday, Hans was on his way to a writing career that would make him one of the most widely-read authors in the world. His first recognition came for his many plays and novels. Five years later, he penned his first of 168 fairy tales. Maybe you recognize a few ...

The folk tales: The Tinder-Box, Little Claus and Big Claus; tales that made fun of human faults: The Emperor’s New Suit (also known as The Emperor’s New Clothes), The Princess and the Pea; tales based on his life: The Ugly Duckling, She was Good for Nothing, and others, some philosophical, some with sly humor and some with serious moral messages: The Snow Queen, The Red Shoes, The Little Mermaid, Thumbelina, The Marsh King’s Daughter.

As Andersen’s popularity rose in the 1840s, he found himself rubbing shoulders with kings and queens, famous composers, poets and novelists. He became wealthy enough to visit throughout Europe, writing about his experiences as he traveled. In Sweden is often considered his best travel book. The sensitive writer also wrote his own story in 1855, The Fairy Tale of My Life. Hans Christian Anderson died a lonely man on August 4, 1875, but his stories and fairy tales live on, entertaining children and adults, inspiring new writers.

In fact, the Hans Christian Andersen Award is presented every other year to an author and an illustrator of children’s books. The ‘Little Nobel Prize’, as it is often called, is the highest international recognition bestowed on an author (since 1956) and to an illustrator (since 1966). It is presented by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY).

The Ugly Duckling would be proud.

Events
April 2nd.


1792 - The U.S. Congress authorized the first U.S. mint. Which mint was first? The one in Philadelphia, PA.

1872 - G.B. Brayton of Boston, MA received a patent for the gas-powered street car.

1889 - Charles Hall patented aluminum on this day.

1896 - Madison Square Garden in New York City hosted the season premiere of the Barnum and Bailey Circus. The circus featured a Duryea horseless carriage.

1902 - The first motion picture theatre opened in Los Angeles. The Electric Theatre charged a dime to see an hour’s entertainment, including the films, The Capture of the Biddle Brothers and New York in a Blizzard. Now that’s entertainment!

1942 - Glenn Miller and his orchestra recorded American Patrol for Victor Records. The jitterbug tune became one of Miller’s most requested hits.

1947 - The Big Story was first heard on NBC radio. It stayed on the air for eight years.

1954 - Carl ‘Bobo’ Olson defeated Kid Gavilan to retain the world middleweight boxing title. Go Bobo!

1956 - Two very successful daytime dramas premiered. The Edge of Night and As the World Turns were seen for the first time on CBS-TV.

1963 - Best Foot Forward opened in New York City. Liza Minelli was the lead actress in this off-Broadway revival of the show which enjoyed a run of 224 performances.

1969 - The Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association signed Lew Alcindor for a reported $1,400,000 five-year contract. Alcindor soon changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabar and his team to the Los Angeles Lakers.

1972 - Actor Burt Reynolds appeared, um, nekkid as a jaybird in Cosmopolitan magazine. This issue of Cosmo became an instant collector’s item and an additional 700,000 copies had to be printed.

1974 - What a night this was at the 46th Annual Academy Awards presentation at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles! Hosting the film industry celebration were John Huston, David Niven, Burt Reynolds, and Diana Ross. It was a banner year for 1973 flicks and the magnificent memories they created: Serpico, The Exorcist, Jonathan Livingston Seagull, The Day of the Jackal, American Graffiti, Papillon, Jesus Christ Superstar, Last Tango in Paris, Live and Let Die, Cinderella Liberty. And this list doesn’t even include The Best Picture of the Year, The Sting (producers: Tony Bill, Michael Phillips, Julia Phillips). The Sting won six additional Oscars: Director (George Roy Hill); Art Direction (Henry Bumstead)and Set Decoration (James Payne); Costume Design (Edith Head); Film Editing (William Reynolds); Scoring/Original Song Score/Adaptation: (Marvin Hamlisch); Writing/Original Story/Screenplay based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Published or Produced (David S. Ward); plus three additional nominations. Nor does it include these Oscar winners: Best Actor: Jack Lemmon for Save the Tiger; Best Actress: Glenda Jackson for A Touch of Class; Best Supporting Actor: John Houseman for The Paper Chase; Best Supporting Actress: Tatum O’Neal for Paper Moon; and Best Music/Song: The Way We Were -- Marvin Hamlisch (music), Alan and Marilyn Bergman (lyrics) from the movie of the same title. And that’s the way it was in 1974.

1977 - Stevie Wonder’s tribute to Duke Ellington, Sir Duke, was released.

1978 - J.R. Ewing and the clan arrived at Southfork, when Dallas was seen for the first time -- on CBS-TV. Larry Hagman, formerly of I Dream of Jeannie fame, starred as J.R. (John Ross) Ewing. The show originally was broadcast on Sunday night, then moved to Saturday and later, Friday nights. The show became an enormously popular hit and was the talk of many people around the water cooler each Monday morning.

1984 - John Thompson became the first black coach to lead his team to the NCAA college basketball championship. Georgetown’s Hoyas defeated Houston 84-75 in Seattle for the win. Thompson’s team in 1982 had finished second to North Carolina for the championship.

1985 - The NCAA Rules Committee adopted the 45-second shot clock for men’s basketball, to begin in the 1986 season. It was an effort to thwart the end-of-game stalls that kept opposing teams from scoring in close contests.

1985 - A day after its release, the album, We are the World, was certified gold with sales in excess of 500,000 copies.

1987 - Drivers were back in the fast lane as states began to the speed limit on interstate highways in limited areas to 65 miles per hour. Watch the signs, please. Radar ahead.

Birthdays
April 2nd.

1725 - Giovanni Casanova
writer: History of My Life; philanderer: his name became synonymous for philanderer, rogue in the English language even though he was Italian; died June 4, 1798

1805 - Hans Christian Andersen
author of fairy tales: The Tinder Box, The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor’s New Clothes; died Aug 4, 1875; see Ugly Duckling Day [above]

1840 - Emile Zola
novelist: Therese Raquin, The Rougon-Macquart, The Belly of Paris, The Grog Shop, Nana, Germinal, The Crash, The Three Cities, The Four Gospels, The Experimental Novel, The Naturalistic Novelists, Naturalism in the Theater; an open letter to win a new trial for Alfred Dreyfus: J’accuse; died Sep 29, 1902

1875 - Walter Chrysler
auto manufacturer: Chrysler Corporation; died Aug 18, 1940

1908 - Buddy Ebsen (Christian Rudolph Ebsen)
actor: The Beverly Hillbillies, Barnaby Jones, The President’s Plane is Missing, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Red Garters, Stone Fox, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; died July 6, 2003

1912 - Herbert Mills
singer: group: The Mills Brothers: Paper Doll, You Always Hurt the One You Love, Glow-Worm; died Apr 12, 1989

1914 - Sir Alec Guinness (Alec Guinness de Cuffe)
Academy Award-winning actor: The Bridge on the River Kwai [1957]; The Empire Strikes Back, The Lavender Hill Mob, Star Wars, A Passage to India, The Quiller Memorandum; died Aug 5, 2000

1917 - Lou Monte
singer: Pepino the Italian Mouse, Lazy Mary, At the Darktown Strutter’s Ball; died June 12, 1989

1918 - Charles White
artist: J’Accuse [1966], posters: Wanted [1969], Homage to Langston Hughes [1971], WPA murals; died Oct 3, 1979

1920 - Jack (John Randolph) Webb
director, actor: Dragnet, Pete Kelly’s Blues; actor: Sunset Boulevard, The Halls of Montezuma; died Dec 23, 1982

1924 - Bobby (Roberto Francisco Gonzales) Avila
baseball: Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1952, 1954, 1955/World Series: 1954], Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Braves, Boston Red Sox; died Oct 26, 2004

1927 - Carmen Basilio
middleweight boxer lost to Sugar Ray Robinson as Robinson regained the world title for the fourth time [1958]

1928 - Rita Gam (Mackay)
actress: The Thief, Klute, Midnight

1938 - Warner Mack (Warner MacPherson)
country singer, songwriter: Is it Wrong

1939 - Marvin (Pentz) Gaye, Jr.
singer: Pride & Joy, How Sweet It Is, I’ll Be Doggone, Ain’t That Peculiar, I Heard It Through The Grapevine, What’s Going On, Let’s Get It On, Sexual Healing; inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [1987]; died Apr 1, 1984

1942 - Leon Russell
singer: Tight Rope, Lady Blue; songwriter: Superstar [Carpenters], This Masquerade [George Benson]

1943 - Glen Dale (Richard Garforth)
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Fortunes

1944 - Marlene Floyd
golf: LPGA Tour; member of Floyd family: 1988 Golf Family of the Year [dad, L.B.], [mom, Edith], [brother, Ray]; NBC-TV golf commentator

1945 - Linda Hunt
Academy Award-winning actress: The Year of Living Dangerously [1983]; Silverado, Dune, Popeye, Kindergarten Cop, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Flying Nun

1945 - Reggie (Carl Reginald) Smith
baseball: Boston Red Sox [World Series: 1967/all-star: 1969, 1972], SL Cardinals [all-star: 1974, 1975], LA Dodgers [World Series: 1977, 1978, 1981/all-star: 1977, 1978, 1980], SF Giants

1945 - Don Sutton
Baseball Hall of Famer: pitcher: 5th highest record of pitching strikeouts [3,569]: LA Dodgers [all-star: 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977/World Series: 1974, 1977, 1978, 1982], Houston Astros, Milwaukee Brewers, California Angels, Oakland Athletics; TV play-by-play: Atlanta Braves

1947 - Emmylou Harris
singer: Grammy Award-winning singer: Elite Hotel [1976], Blue Kentucky Girl [1978], That Lovin’ You Feeling Again [w/Roy Orbison - 1980], Trio [1987], At the Ryman [w/the Nash Ramblers - 1992], Wrecking Ball [1996]; Mr. Sandman, The Last Waltz, Pledging My Love, In My Dreams, Amarillo, ’Till I Gain Control Again

1949 - Pamela Reed
actress: Junior, Kindergarten Cop, The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Right Stuff, The Best of Times, The Goodbye People, The Long Riders, Bob Roberts, Grand, Family Album, The Andros Targets, Getting Out

1953 - Debralee Scott
actress: Police Academy, Just Tell Me You Love Me; died Apr 5, 2005

1961 - Keren Woodward
singer: group: Bananarama: Cruel Summer, Venus, I Heard a Rumor.

Chart Toppers
April 2nd.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
Beg Your Pardon - Francis Craig
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley
Rock Island Line - Lonnie Donegan
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 She Loves You - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Suspicion - Terry Stafford
Saginaw, Michigan - Lefty Frizzell

1972 A Horse with No Name - America
Puppy Love - Donny Osmond
Mother and Child Reunion - Paul Simon
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Working My Way Back to You/Forgive Me, Girl - Spinners
Call Me - Blondie
I’d Love to Lay You Down - Conway Twitty

1988 Man in the Mirror - Michael Jackson
Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car - Billy Ocean
I Want Her - Keith Sweat
Love Will Find Its Way to You - Reba McEntire


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-01-2007, 10:27 PM
93rd day of 2007 - 272 remaining.

Tuesday, April 3, 2007
PONY EXPRESS DAY.

Pony Express mail service began this day in St. Joseph, Missouri. The year was 1860 and the first Pony Express rider was heading for California. The next day, another rider left Sacramento, California heading east for Missouri.

Each rider had a 75 to 100 mile run before a switch was made with another rider. The switch was made at one of 190 way stations along the route; each way station being about ten to fifteen miles apart.

The Pony Express riders delivered the mail within ten days (similar to our current snail mail) for postage paid of $5 per ounce.

This style of mail service became antiquated within a short two years, being put out to pasture by the advent of the overland telegraph.

Events
April 3rd.

1776 - Harvard College conferred the first honorary Doctor of Laws degree to George Washington.

1800 - Martha Washington became the first U.S. President’s wife to be allowed to ‘frank’ mail. What does that mean? Well, according to Mr. Webster’s dictionary, frank means “To send free of postage. The right to send mail for free. A mark indicating this right.”

1829 - James Carrington of Wallingford, CT patented the coffee mill. Have a cup of fresh ground in celebration today.

1866 - Rudolph Eickemeyer and G. Osterheld of Yonkers, New York patented a blocking and shaping machine for hats. Which reminds us, do you know why cowboy hats are turned up at the sides? -- So three cowboys can ride in a pickup truck!

1930 - The fledgling film industry patted itself on its collective back this night at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. They were celebrating the 2nd Annual Academy Awards presentation for movies made during the 1928-1929 year. (Movies made during the 1929-1930 year were honored seven months later on November 5.) There were no ‘officially’ announced nominees; but there was a host for the evening’s activities: Writer, director, producer William C. de Mille. No one ran away with all the awards either. The Best Director was Frank Lloyd for The Divine Lady; Warner Baxter was voted Best Actor for his role in In Old Arizona, while Mary Pickford took home the Best Actress award for her part in Coquette. Hanns Kräly penned the script for The Patriot, winning the Best Writing award and the Best Picture of the year was The Broadway Melody produced by Harry Rapf.

1933 - First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt informed newspaper reporters that beer would be served at the White House. This followed the March 22 legislation legalizing ‘3.2’ beer.

1939 - Mr. District Attorney was heard for the first time on NBC radio. The serial about the ‘champion of the people’ was originally a 15-minute nightly program. In June of 1939, the program went to a half-hour weekly format. Mr. District Attorney aired until 1952.

1942 - People Are Funny was first heard this day on NBC radio. Art Baker was the show’s first host. Art Linkletter took over the popular program on radio in 1943 and later moved it to television.

1949 - Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis debuted on radio in an NBC program that ran until 1952.

1952 - Harry Belafonte recorded his first songs for RCA Victor at Manhattan Center in New York City. Hugo Winterhalter backed up the singer with an 18-piece orchestra. Among the sides recorded were A-Roving and Chimney Smoke.

1953 - TV Guide was published for the first time -- from Radnor, Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia). The publication reached a circulation of 1,500,000 readers in its first year.

1955 - Fred Astaire appeared on television for the first time on The Toast of the Town, with host, Ed Sullivan. Already an established dancer in films, Astaire was quick to become a TV sensation as well.

1962 - Race jockey Eddie Arcaro retired with a career record of 15,327 victories for total winnings of $12,265,455. Arcaro was the first jockey to win 3,000 races and the first to ride five Kentucky Derby winners. In the Derby, Arcaro rode these mounts to the Winner’s Circle: Lawrin, Whirl-a-Way, Hoop Jr., Citation and Hill Gail.

1965 - Bob Dylan appeared on the pop music charts for the first time. Subterranean Homesick Blues entered the Top 40 at number 39. The song stayed on the charts for eight weeks. Dylan would chart a total of 12 singles on the pop charts between 1965 and 1979. He appeared in the films Don’t Look Back, Eat the Document and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. He made the film Renaldo and Clara in 1978. Dylan co-starred in the film Hearts of Fire in 1987. He became a member of the Traveling Wilburys and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988. Dylan won the Grammy’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.

1978 - The stars came out to honor Star Wars and other films of 1977 at the 50th anniversary of the Academy Awards. Bob Hope starred as the host of the festivities at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Although Star Wars was nominated in 10 categories including Best Picture, Annie Hall (Charles H. Joffe, Producer) copped the top award, as well as Oscars for Best Director (Woody Allen); Best Actress (Diane Keaton); and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman). Star Wars didn’t get any of the other audience-thriller Oscars either. The Best Actor statuette went to Richard Dreyfuss for his performance in The Goodbye Girl; Jason Robards was acclaimed as the Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Julia); his supporting co-star, Vanessa Redgrave, also took home the golden boy; as did Joseph Brooks for Best Music/Song: You Light Up My Life from the movie with the same title. Don’t feel sorry for Star Wars. though. It was and is a favorite of many in and out of the industry and it was honored with six Academy Awards plus the Special Achievement honor to Benjamin Burtt, Jr. for Sound Effects (for the creation of the alien, creature and robot voices) which he shared with Frank Warner (Close Encounters of the Third Kind - Sound Effects Editing). The other Academy Awards for Star Wars were: Best Music/Original Score (John Williams); Best Effects/Visual Effects (John Stears, John Dykstra, Richard Edlund, Grant McCune, Robert Blalack); Best Film Editing (Paul Hirsch, Marcia Lucas, Richard Chew); Best Sound (Don MacDougall, Ray West, Bob Minkler, Derek Ball); Best Costume Design (John Mollo); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (John Barry, Norman Reynolds, Leslie Dilley, Roger Christian). Now that’s star status!

1979 - Jane Byrne became the first female mayor in Chicago’s history.

1982 - John Chancellor stepped down as anchor of the The NBC Nightly News. Roger Mudd and Tom Brokaw assumed roles as coanchors.

1985 - The famed Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood closed on this day after 57 years. All of the furnishings were kept, including famous Booth #5 -- where Clark Gable proposed to Carole Lombard.

Birthdays
April 3rd.

1783 - Washington Irving
author: Rip Van Winkle, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, Life of Washington; died Nov 28, 1859

1823 - William M. (Marcy) ‘Boss’ Tweed
political boss: New York City: known for his Tweed ‘Ring’ which stole thirty to two hundred million dollars from NYC; died [in prison] Apr 12, 1878

1837 - John Burroughs
author: “Time does not become sacred to us until we have lived it.”; died Mar 29, 1921

1898 - George Jessel
comedian, actor: Valley of the Dolls, Diary of a Young Comic; died May 24, 1981

1921 - Jan Sterling (Adriance)
actress: The Harder They Fall, Pony Express, High School Confidential, The Incident, Split Second; died Mar 26, 2004

1924 - Marlon Brando
Academy Award-winning actor: On the Waterfront [1954], The Godfather [1972]; Apocalypse Now, Last Tango in Paris, One-eyed Jacks; Emmy Award: Roots: Next Generation; died July 1, 2004

1924 - Doris Day (Doris Mary Ann Von Kappelhoff)
singer: Whatever Will Be, Will Be, Everybody Loves a Lover, Sentimental Journey; actress: Young at Heart, Pillow Talk, April in Paris, Lullaby of Broadway

1928 - Don Gibson
songwriter: I Can’t Stop Loving You, Sweet Dreams, Too Soon To Know, Guess Away the Blues, Country Green; singer: Oh Lonesome Me, Blue Blue Day, Just One Time, Sea of Heartbreak; died Nov 17, 2003

1929 - Miyoshi Umeki
actress: Flower Drum Song, The Horizontal Lieutenant, Sayonara, The Courtship of Eddie’s Father

1930 - Helmut Kohl
Chancellor: Federal Republic of Germany [1982-1998]

1933 - Rod Funseth
golf: Masters runner-up [1978], US Senior Open runner-up [1983]

1934 - Jane Goodall
anthropologist: studied chimpanzees; author: In the Shadow of Man

1937 - Sandra Spuzich
golf champ: Women’s U.S. Open [1966]

1941 - Jan Berry
songwriter, singer: group: Jan and Dean: The Little Old Lady from Pasadena, Dead Man’s Curve, Heart and Soul, Linda, Baby Talk, Surf City; died Mar 26, 2004

1942 - Marsha Mason
actress: The Goodbye Girl, Cinderella Liberty, Blume in Love, Chapter Two, Heartbreak Ridge

1942 - (Carson) Wayne Newton
singer: Danke Shoen, Red Roses for a Blue Lady, Daddy Don’t You Walk So Fast

1943 - Jonathan Lynn
actor: Doctor in the House; director: Sgt. Bilko, Greedy, My Cousin Vinny, The Distinguished Gentleman; writer, director: Nuns on the Run, Clue

1944 - Tony Orlando (Michael Anthony Orlando Cassavitis)
singer: Halfway to Paradise, Bless You; group: Tony Orlando and Dawn: Knock Three Times, Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree, Candida

1944 - Barry Pritchard
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Fortunes: You've Got Your Troubles; died Jan 11, 1999

1945 - Bernie (Bernard) Parent
hockey: NHL: Boston Bruins, Philadelphia Flyers goalie: record for season wins [47: 1973-1974], Toronto Maple Leafs

1949 - Donny Anderson
football: Green Bay Packers running back and punter: Super Bowls I and II

1955 - Mick Mars
musician: guitar: group: Motley Crue: LPs: Too Fast for Love, Shout at the Devil, Theatre of Pain

1958 - Alec Baldwin (Alexander Rae Baldwin III)
actor: Pearl Harbor, The Hunt for Red October, Beetlejuice, The Getaway, Married to the Mob, Talk Radio, Working Girl, Miami Blues, Knots Landing

1961 - Eddie Murphy
comedian: Saturday Night Live; actor: 48 Hrs., Beverly Hills Cop series, Trading Places, Coming to America, The Nutty Professor, Nutty Professor II: The Klumps, Doctor Dolittle

1972 - Jennie Garth
actress: Beverly Hills 90210.

Chart Toppers
April 3rd.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The
Skyliners)
Far Away Places - Margaret Whiting
Red Roses for a Blue Lady - Vaughn Monroe
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
Gone - Ferlin Husky
There You Go - Johnny Cash

1965 Stop! In the Name of Love - The Supremes
I’m Telling You Now - Freddie & The Dreamers
Shotgun - Jr. Walker & The All Stars
King of the Road - Roger Miller

1973 Killing Me Softly with His Song - Roberta Flack
Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001) - Deodato
Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye) - Gladys
Knight & The Pips
Keep Me in Mind - Lynn Anderson

1981 Rapture - Blondie
Woman - John Lennon
The Best of Times - Styx
Texas Women - Hank Williams, Jr.

1989 Eternal Flame - Bangles
Girl You Know It’s True - Milli Vanilli
The Look - Roxette
Baby’s Gotten Good at Goodbye - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

Hope to catch you all, Tuesday night for, Wednesdays, Today in history.
Shadow. ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

icedreams
04-02-2007, 08:16 PM
http://i10.tinypic.com/30w8si1.gif Don't forget to read

icedreams
04-03-2007, 06:58 PM
Bump :)

ShadowThomas
04-03-2007, 11:09 PM
Bump :)

Thank you, Ann for keeping my thread bumped up top a couple of times. ;) ;) :)

ShadowThomas
04-03-2007, 11:16 PM
94th day of 2007 - 271 remaining

Wednesday, April 4, 2007
GIAMATTI DAY.

What do baseball, literature and Yale University have in common? If you said Angelo Bartlett Giamatti, you would be absolutely correct!

Angelo Giamatti was born on this day in 1938 in the Boston area, growing up in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

Better known as A. Bartlett Giamatti, he was educated at Yale and became a professor of literature at the highly respected university. In 1978 Giamatti became Yale’s youngest president.

Having gone as far as he could go at Yale, the professor, who had always been a Boston Red Sox fan, decided to take baseball more seriously. It was 1986 and Bart, as he was then known, was made president of major-league baseball’s National League. Three years later, Bart Giamatti became Commissioner of Baseball. As Commissioner, he hoped to keep baseball an outdoor game that was played on real grass, "Americans have become accustomed to associating summer’s renewal of the earth and fall’s harvest with baseball. You can’t conceive of baseball being played in the winter. It is fitted to the season in an extraordinary way."

Bart Giamatti’s last role as Commissioner was played out just eight days before his death on September 1, 1989. He gave Pete Rose a life sentence: no more baseball (because Rose had bet on the game).

Events
April 4th.


1859 - Daniel Emmett introduced I Wish I was in Dixie’s Land (later named Dixie) in New York City. Just two years later, the song became the Civil War song of the Confederacy.

1887 - Susanna M. Salter became the first woman mayor in the U.S. She was duly elected by the people of Argonia, KS. Ms. Salter won by a two-thirds majority but didn’t even know she was in the running ’til she went into the voting booth. It seems that her name was submitted by the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. Susanna M. Salter received $1 for her year as mayor.

1891 - Distinguished American actor Edwin Booth made his final stage appearance in a production of Hamlet at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

1914 - The first known serialized moving picture opened in New York City. The Perils of Pauline starred Pearl White.

1932 - Professor C.G. King of the University of Pittsburgh isolated vitamin C after five years of research. Take some vitamin C today and feel better fast! Suck a lemon!

1938 - After seven years of singing on the radio, Kate Smith began a new noontime talk show.

1939 - Glenn Miller recorded his theme song, Moonlight Serenade, for Bluebird Records. Previously, the Miller theme had been Gone with the Dawn and, before then, Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep.

1944 - Because he refused to pay his own expenses for road trips, Rogers Hornsby quit as the manager of the Vera Cruz, Mexico baseball club.

1954 - Maestro Arturo Toscanini conducted his last concert with the NBC Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Toscanini ended a 17-year association with the orchestra.

1960 - Eleven Academy Awards were presented to one movie at the 32nd Annual Academy Awards at the RKO Pantages Theater, Los Angeles. Ben-Hur, the Best Picture of 1959, was the first motion picture to receive that many Oscars. The other categories for which the MGM film, produced by Sam Zimbalist, was honored were: Best Director (William Wyler); Best Actor (Charlton Heston); Best Supporting Actor (Hugh Griffith); Best Cinematography/Color (Robert L. Surtees); Best Art Direction-Set Direction/Color (Edward Carfagno, William A. Horning, Hugh Hunt); Best Costume Design/Color (Elizabeth Haffenden); Best Sound (MGM Studio Sound Department, Franklin E. Milton, Sound Director); Best Film Editing (John D. Dunning, Ralph E. Winters); Best Effects/Special Effects (visual-A. Arnold Gillespie, Robert MacDonald III; audible-Milo B. Lory); and Best Music/Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture (Miklos Rozsa). Ben-Hur lost only one nomination: Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium. Room at the Top (Neil Paterson) took that Oscar home and the Best Actress award, too (Simone Signoret). The Best Supporting Actress award went to Shelley Winters for her performance in The Diary of Anne Frank, her second Oscar. The moviemakers of Anatomy of a Murder had high hopes with six nominations in the ring; but that’s all they were. However, the Best Music/Song Oscar went to High Hopes (James Van Heusen-music, Sammy Cahn-lyrics) from A Hole in the Head. It would be 38 years and a lot of high hopes before one film won 11 Academy Awards again (Titanic). And who knows how long before the host is an Award recipient again! (Bob Hope received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.)

1964 - The Beatles set an all-time record on the Top 100 chart of Billboard magazine this day. All five of the top songs were by the British rock group. In addition, The Beatles also had the number one album as Meet the Beatles continued to lead all others. The LP was the top album from February 15 through May 2, when it was replaced by The Beatles Second Album. It was estimated at the time that The Beatles accounted for 60 percent of the entire singles record business during the first three months of 1964. The top five singles by The Beatles this day were:
1) Can’t Buy Me Love
2) Twist and Shout
3) She Loves You
4) I Want to Hold Your Hand
5) Please Please Me
“What song was number six?” you ask. Suspicion by Terry Stafford. Hey, we don’t leave anything out.

1967 - Johnny Carson quit The Tonight Show. He returned three weeks later with an additional $30,000 a week! Hi yo!

1968 - Bobby Goldsboro received a gold record for the single, Honey. The poignantly sad song charted for 13 weeks -- spending five weeks at number one. Goldsboro produced a total of 11 hits on the pop charts in the 1960s and 1970s. Honey was his only million seller and only number one hit.

1971 - Veterans stadium in Philadelphia, PA was dedicated this day. At the time, it was the largest baseball park in the National League. A total of 56,371 fans could come out to see the Phillies play baseball or the Eagles play football. (Veterans Stadium was demolished on March 21, 2004 and the area where it stood is now a parking lot for the Philadelphia Phillies’ Citizens Bank Park sporting complex.)

1984 - Bob Bell retired as Bozo the Clown on WGN-TV in Chicago, IL. Bell was an institution in the Windy City since making his first appearance in 1960. Pinto Colvig was the original Bozo.

Birthdays
April 4th.

1821 - Linus Yale
inventor: Yale Infallible Bank Lock and cylinder lock; died Dec 25, 1868

1895 - Arthur Murray (Moses Teichman)
dancer: Arthur Murray Dance Studios; died Mar 3, 1991

1906 - John Cameron Swayze
newsman: NBC-TV; panelist: Who Said That; commercial spokesman: Timex; died Aug 15, 1995

1914 - Frances Langford (Frances Newbern)
radio singer: I’m In The Mood For Love; appeared on Dick Powell’s Hollywood Hotel, Bob Hope’s USO tours; actress: Born to Dance, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Dixie Jamboree, Girl Rush; died July 11, 2005

1915 - Muddy Waters (McKinley Morganfield)
blues singer, guitarist: Close to You, Baby Please Don’t Go, She’s Nineteen Years Old, I Can’t Be Satisfied, Honey Bee; died Apr 30, 1983

1921 - Elizabeth Wilson
actress: The Boys Next Door, Quiz Show, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, The Addams Family, The Graduate, Taken in Marriage, Doc, East Side/West Side

1922 - Elmer Bernstein
Academy Award-winning composer of film scores: Thoroughly Modern Millie [1967]; Sudden Fear, The Man with the Golden Arm, Ten Commandments, Sweet Smell of Success, To Kill a Mocking Bird, Walk on the Wild Side, The Magnificent Seven; died Aug 18, 2004

1924 - Gil (Gilbert Raymond) Hodges
baseball: Brooklyn Dodgers [shares record for most home runs in one game [4] August 31, 1950/World Series: 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956/all-star: 1949, 1950-1955, 1957], LA Dodgers [World Series: 1959], NY Mets; died Apr 2, 1972

1928 - Maya Angelou
author: All God’s Children Need Travelling Shoes

1932 - Anthony Perkins
actor: Psycho series, The Sins of Dorian Gray, Mahogany, Murder on the Orient Express, On the Beach, Desire Under the Elms, Friendly Persuasion; died Sep 12, 1992

1938 - Angelo (Bartlett) Giamatti
president: Yale University; commisioner: major-league baseball; died Sep 1, 1989; see Giamatti Day [above]

1938 - Norro Wilson
singer, composer, producer: Surround Me with Love, Men [for Charly McClain]; sang duets with Margo Smith

1939 - JoAnne Carner (Gunerson)
golf champion: U.S. Open [1971, 1976], Du Maurier Classic [1975, 1978]

1939 - Hugh Masekela
musician: trumpet: Grazing in the Grass

1939 - Ernie Terrell
boxer: Heavyweight Champ [1965]

1942 - Jim (James Louis) Fregosi
baseball: LA Angels [all-star: 1964], California Angels [all-star: 1966-1970], NY Mets, Texas Rangers, Pittsburgh Pirates

1942 - Kris Jensen
singer: Torture

1942 - Kitty Kelley
author: Nancy Reagan, Jackie O, His Way

1943 - Mike (Michael Peter) Epstein
‘Superjew’: baseball: Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators, Oakland Athletics [World Series: 1972], California Angels, Texas Rangers

1946 - Craig T. Nelson
Emmy Award-winning actor: Coach [1991-1992]; Probable Cause, Turner and Hooch, Troop Beverly Hills, Silkwood, All the Right Moves, Stir Crazy, Chicago Story, Call to Glory, Private Benjamin, Poltergeist, The Killing Fields, The District

1947 - Ray (Raymond Earl) Fosse
baseball: catcher: Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1970, 1971], Oakland Athletics [World Series: 1973, 1974], Seattle Mariners, Milwaukee Brewers

1947 - Ed White
football: Minnesota Vikings guard: Super Bowls IV, VIII, IX, XI

1948 - Berry Oakley
musician: bass: group: The Allman Brothers Band: Ramblin’ Man; died Nov 11, 1972

1950 - Christine Lahti
actress: Swing Shift, Crazy from the Heart, The Doctor, Hideaway, The Harvey Korman Show

1951 - Steve Gatlin
singer: group: The Gatlin Brothers: Sweet Becky Walker, The Bigger They Are, the Harder They Fall, Delta Dirt, Broken Lady, Statues without Hearts, Night Time Magic, I’ve Done Enough Dyin’ Today, All the Gold in California, Take Me to Your Lovin’ Place, It Don’t Get No Better Than This, Sure Feels like Love, Houston [Means I’m One Day Closer to You], Denver

1952 - Dave Hill
musician: guitar: group: Slade: Run Runaway, My Oh My, Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me, Merry Xmas Everybody

1957 - Graeme Kelling
musician: guitar: group: Deacon Blue; died June 10, 2004

1965 - Robert Downey Jr.
actor: Ally McBeal, Richard III, Natural Born Killers, Short Cuts, Chaplin, Soapdish, Baby It’s You, U.S. Marshals

1966 - Nancy McKeon
actress: The Facts of Life, The Wrong Woman, Teresa’s Tattoo, Where the Day Takes You, The Lightning Incident, Poison Ivy, High School USA.

Chart Toppers
April 4th.

1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Dearie - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Kenny Gardner Trio)
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 Tequila - The Champs
He’s Got the Whole World (In His Hands) - Laurie London
Lollipop - Chordettes
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Daydream - The Lovin’ Spoonful
Waitin’ in Your Welfare Line - Buck Owens

1974 Sunshine on My Shoulders - John Denver
Hooked on a Feeling - Blue Swede
Bennie & The Jets - Elton John
Would You Lay with Me (In a Field of Stone) - Tanya Tucker

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Make a Move on Me - Olivia Newton-John
Bobbie Sue - The Oak Ridge Boys

1990 Black Velvet - Alannah Myles
Love Will Lead You Back - Taylor Dayne
I Wish It Would Rain Down - Phil Collins
Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

lynn
04-04-2007, 07:32 PM
Thanks Shadow .... ;)

lynn
04-04-2007, 09:19 PM
Your very welcome, Lynn. ;) Glad to help out. :) :) ;)

icedreams
04-04-2007, 09:59 PM
Bump for some good reading :)

lynn
04-04-2007, 10:03 PM
Bump for some good reading :)

Thanks Shadow !!!!! :)

ShadowThomas
04-04-2007, 11:23 PM
95th day of 2007 - 270 remaining.

Thursday, April 5, 2007
SUPERSTAR DAY.

Some of the world’s best-known superstars were born on this day, starting in 1900 with Spencer Tracy. A year later Melvyn Douglas made the scene, followed in seven years by Bette Davis. Then eight years later Gregory Peck was born. For those of you who lost track, that would be 1916.

By 1979 they had collected a total of seven Oscars between them. Bette Davis copped the Best Actress Award in 1935 for her performance in Dangerous and then again in 1938 for Jezebel. It was the same year that Spencer Tracy took home the Best Actor trophy for his role as Father Flanagan in Boys Town. The year before, Tracy won the coveted statue for Captains Courageous. In 1962 the honors went to Gregory Peck for his performance in To Kill a Mockingbird. Melvyn Douglas picked up his two Oscars as Best Supporting Actor in Hud in 1963 and Being There in 1979.

Other movies associated with these timeless superstars include Father of the Bride and Inherit the Wind for Spencer Tracy, As You Desire Me for Melvyn Douglas, Gentleman’s Agreement and Roman Holiday for Gregory Peck and All About Eve and Whatever Happened To Baby Jane? for Bette Davis. Go rent a few of these classic films and see what movies were really about ... when Those Were the Days.

Events
April 5th.

1827 - James H. Hackett became the first American actor to appear abroad as he performed at Covent Garden in London, England.

1869 - Daniel Bakeman, the last surviving soldier of the Revolutionary War, died at the age of 109.

1915 - Jess Willard knocked out Jack Johnson in the 26th round to win the heavyweight boxing championship held in Havana, Cuba. Gee, anybody who goes 26 rounds would probably wish to be knocked out by that time...

1923 - Firestone Tire and Rubber Company of Akron, OH began the first regular production of balloon tires.

1933 - The first operation to remove a lung was performed -- at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, MO.

1955 - Richard J. Daley was elected mayor of Chicago, IL, starting one of the most colorful political careers not only of the Windy City, but anywhere.

1958 - Johnny Mathis’ album, Johnny’s Greatest Hits, on Columbia Records, made it to the pop music charts for the first time. The LP remained on the charts for a record 490 weeks (nearly 9-1/2 years!) The record began its stay at number one (three weeks) on June 9, 1958. Mathis studied opera from age 13 and earned a track and field scholarship at San Francisco State College. He was invited to Olympic try-outs and chose a singing career instead. He was originally a jazz-style singer when Mitch Miller of Columbia switched Mathis to singing pop ballads. Johnny would chart over 60 albums in 30 years.

1965 - Two very British but very different women were the cause of much celebration at the 37th Annual Academy Awards at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles. My Fair Lady and Mary Poppins vied for Best Picture as did Alexis Zorbas; Becket; and Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. And the winner was ... My Fair Lady (Jack L. Warner, producer). My Fair Lady was the name in the winner’s envelope seven more times: Best Director (George Cukor); Best Actor (Rex Harrison); Best Cinematography/Color (Harry Stradling); Best Art Direction-Set Decoration/Color (Gene Allen, Cecil Beaton, George James Hopkins); Best Costume Design/Color (Cecil Beaton); Best Sound (George Groves-Warner Bros. Studio Sound Dept.); and Best Music/Scoring of Music, Adaptation or Treatment (André Previn). Mary Poppins was not about to let Eliza Doolittle steal all her thunder. Julie Andrews was awarded an Oscar for Best Actress for her title role; Cotton Warburton won for Best Film Editing; Peter Ellenshaw, Hamilton Luske, Eustace Lycett for Best Effects, Special Visual Effects and Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman won for Best Music/Song (Chim Chim Cher-ee from Mary Poppins) and for Best Music/Score-Substantially Original. The two remaining crowd-pleaser awards went to Peter Ustinov in Topkapi for Best Supporting Actor and to Lila Kedrova in Alexis Zorbas for Best Supporting Actress. The host for this gala ceremony was Bob Hope.

1966 - Timothy Leary spoke at New York’s Town Hall and compared LSD to a microscope saying that the drug “is to psychology what the microscope is to biology,” making not just a few to wonder, “What’s he smokin’?”

1982 - After years of publication to the radio and recording industry, Record World magazine ceased publication and filed for bankruptcy protection.

1984 - Kareem Abdul-Jabbar of the Los Angeles Lakers used his patented 12-foot skyhook in the fourth quarter to become the all-time NBA regular season scoring leader this night. He broke the previous mark held by Wilt Chamberlain who had 31,419 points. Kareem broke the scoring record on a pass play from Magic Johnson and with three Utah Jazz players guarding him. The Lakers won, 129-115.

1985 - Broadcasters banded together to play the single, We Are the World, at 10:50 a.m. E.S.T. Stations in the United States were joined by hundreds of others around the world in a sign of unification for the African relief cause. Even Muzak made the song only the second vocal selection it has ever played in elevators and offices since its inception.

1987 - Calling it the first launching of a television network in almost 40 years, the FOX Broadcasting Company, under the direction of media and publishing baron, Rupert Murdoch, started with two Sunday night offerings. OK. Who said one was The Simpsons? “Hey, man, get a life. Not true. Cowabonga, dude!” Thanks, Bart. No, actually, Married......With Children and The Tracey Ullman Show were the beginnings of the FOX lineup.

Birthdays
April 5th.

1827 - Joseph Lister
British surgeon, inventor: Listerine mouthwash; President of the Royal Society [1895 to 1900]; died Feb 10, 1912

1856 - Booker T. Washington
educator, black leader, author: Up from Slavery; died Nov 14, 1915

1900 - Spencer (Bonaventure) Tracy
Academy Award-winning actor: Captains Courageous [1937], Boys Town [1938]; San Francisco, Stanley and Livingstone, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde [1941], Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Adam’s Rib, Father of the Bride [1950], Pat and Mike, Bad Day at Black Rock, The Mountain, The Old Man and the Sea, How the West Was Won, It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner; died June 10, 1967; see Superstar Day [above]

1901 - Melvyn Douglas (Melvyn Edouard Hesselberg)
Academy Award-winning actor: [supporting] Hud [1963], [supporting] Being There [1979]; The Vampire Bat, Captains Courageous, Ninotchka, Three Hearts for Julia, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, The Americanization of Emily, I Never Sang for My Father, The Candidate, The Seduction of Joe Tynan, The Changeling, Ghost Story; died Aug 4, 1981; see Superstar Day [above]

1908 - Bette (Ruth Elizabeth) Davis
Academy Award-winning actress: Dangerous [1935], Jezebel [1938]; Dark Victory, The Letter, The Little Foxes, Now, Voyager, Mr. Skeffington, All About Eve, The Star, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?; died Oct 6, 1989; see Superstar Day [above]

1908 - Jagjivan Ram
political leader: India; died in July 6, 1986

1916 - (Eldred) Gregory Peck
Academy Award-winning actor: To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]; The Keys of the Kingdom, The Yearling, Duel in the Sun, Gentleman’s Agreement, Twelve O’Clock High, David and Bathsheba, Captain Horatio Hornblower, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, Roman Holiday, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, Moby Dick [1956], The Guns of Navarone, Marooned, MacArthur, The Boys from Brazil, Moby Dick [TV: 1998]; Jean Hersholt Humanitarian (Academy) Award [1968]; died June 12, 2003; see Superstar Day [above]

1920 - Arthur Hailey
author: Airport, The Final Diagnosis

1921 - Robert Q. Lewis
comedian, TV quiz show panelist: What’s My Line, To Tell the Truth, Call My Bluff; died Dec 11, 1991

1922 - Gale Storm (Josephine Cottle)
singer: Ivory Tower, actress: My Little Margie

1925 - Stan Levey
musician: drums: in band with Charlie Parker; one of the Lighthouse All-Stars; composer

1926 - Roger Corman
director: The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, Masque of the Red Death, The Raven, Little Shop of Horrors, The Fall of the House of Usher, Swamp Women

1928 - Tony Williams
singer: group: The Platters: Only You, The Great Pretender, Twilight Time, My Prayer, Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, Harbor Lights; died Aug 14, 1992

1929 - Nigel Hawthorne
actor: Richard III, Demolition Man, Firefox, Young Winston, Gandhi; died Dec 26, 2001

1932 - Billy Bland
singer: Let the Little Girl Dance, My Heart’s on Fire

1933 - Frank Gorshin
impressionist, actor: Batman, The Great Impostor; died May 17, 2005

1934 - Stanley Turrentine
jazz musician: tenor sax; one of the ‘Pittsburgh Brethren’; played with Tommy Turrentine [his brother], Lowell Fulson, Tadd Dameron, Earl Bostic, Max Roach; his hits included: The Look of Love, Midnight Special, Look Out, Pieces of a Dream, Straight Ahead, Wonderland, La Place; died Sep 12, 2000

1937 - Colin Powell
U.S. Secretary of State; military leader: four-star general, Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff [1989-1993]

1940 - Tommy Cash
songwriter: You Don’t Hear; country singer: Six White Horses, Rise and Shine, One Song Away, I Recall a Gypsy Woman; brother of Johnny Cash

1941 - Michael Moriarty
actor: Bang the Drum Slowly, The Last Detail, Windmills of the Gods

1942 - Peter Greenaway
director, writer: Prospero’s Books, The Belly of an Architect, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, A Zed & Two Noughts, Drowning by Numbers, The Draughtsman’s Contract

1943 - Max Gail
actor: Sodbusters, D.C. Cab, Night Moves, Barney Miller, Whiz Kids, Normal Life, Pearl

1945 - Doug Favell
hockey: Univ. of Colorado; NHL: Philadelphia Flyers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Colorado Rockies

1946 - Jane Asher
actress: Dreamchild, Masque of the Red Death, The Prince and the Pauper, Brideshead Revisited

1949 - Dr. Judith A. Resnik
electrical engineer, astronaut: mission specialist on the ill-fated space shuttle Challenger [died Jan 28, 1986]

1950 - Marv Bateman
football: Buffalo Bills, Washington Redskins, LA Rams

1950 - Agnetha Faltskog
singer: group: Abba: People Need Love, Waterloo, Dancing Queen; solo: Can’t Shake Loose

1951 - Rennie (Renaldo Antonio Porte) Stennett
baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates [shares record: seven hits in nine-inning game - 9/16/75/World Series: 1979], SF Giants

1951 - Brad Van Pelt
football: Michigan State Univ. [Maxwell Award Winner: 1972], Buffalo Bills, NY Giants

1966 - Mike McCready
musician: guitar: group: Pearl Jam.

Chart Toppers
April 5th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
Aba Daba Honeymoon - Debbie Reynolds and Carleton Carpenter
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Venus - Frankie Avalon
Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
It’s Just a Matter of Time - Brook Benton
When It’s Springtime in Alaska (It’s Forty Below) - Johnny Horton

1967 Happy Together - The Turtles
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Mamas & The Papas
Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
Walk Through This World with Me - George Jones

1975 Lovin’ You - Minnie Riperton
Philadelphia Freedom - The Elton John Band
No No Song/Snookeroo - Ringo Starr
I Just Can’t Get Her Out of My Mind - Johnny Rodriguez

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me - Culture Club
Hungry like the Wolf - Duran Duran
When I’m Away from You - The Bellamy Brothers

1991 Coming Out of the Dark - Gloria Estafan
This House - Tracie Spencer
Hold You Tight - Tara Kemp
Two of a Kind, Workin’ on a Full House - Garth Brooks


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

icedreams
04-05-2007, 08:53 PM
:yourock:

ShadowThomas
04-06-2007, 12:27 AM
96th day of 2007 - 269 remaining.

Friday, April 6, 2007
LOWELL THOMAS DAY. ;)

He signed on this day in 1892 with a cry. And then, beginning in 1930 and for fifty more years, he would sign off with, “So long until tomorrow.”

Lowell Thomas, one of America’s most respected newscasters was born in Woodington, Ohio and grew up in Colorado. With degrees from the University of Colorado, New York University, and Columbia University, he became one of the best educated newsmen in the business. And he started in the business at the age of 19 as a reporter for the New York Daily News. Thomas gained notoriety when -- as cameraman Harry Chase filmed -- he reported his eye witness account of author T.E. Lawrence’s 1917 escapades. Lawrence was the British military liaison to the Arabs in their revolt against the Turks. Lowell Thomas’ romantic and adventurous tales of the Brit he referred to as “Lawrence of Arabia,” played to audiences throughout the world, making Lawrence a movie star and Thomas a millionaire.

He began his long broadcasting career in 1930, as a replacement for NBC’s Floyd Gibbons. Thomas’ career spanned over five decades and three networks. The first sixteen years were spent at NBC where his broadcasts became so important that the network placed two microphones in front of him ... just in case one failed. Lowell Thomas would scoop the other networks and the newspapers wielding a clout and influence never before heard on the airwaves.

After NBC, Thomas moved to CBS, where he stayed for thirty years. His travel adventures made for good news stories and he incorporated them into his nightly news program in a feature called the Tall Tale Club.

Then, in his last years (Thomas died Aug. 29, 1981), he hosted Lowell Thomas Remembers, a series on National Public Radio.

We remember Lowell Thomas as the consummate news broadcaster, and the first to broadcast at one time or another from a ship, an airplane, a submarine and a coal mine.

So long, until tomorrow.

Events
April 6th.


1896 - The first modern Olympic Games began in Athens, Greece. James B. Connolly of Boston, MA won the first event by capturing the hop, skip and jump contest.

1909 - Commodore Robert Peary became the first man to reach the North Pole -- not counting Santa Claus, of course. Actually, Robert Peary and Matthew H. Henson, Peary’s servant, were the first men to reach the North Pole. Because Henson was a black, hired man, his presence at this historic moment was not recognized until 1945 when he received a medal for outstanding service in the field of science from the U.S. government.

1916 - Charlie Chaplin was 26 years old this day when he signed a movie contract with the Mutual Film Corporation. He made a fair piece of change, too -- $675,000 a year -- and became the highest-paid film star in the world.

1925 - Eddie Cantor recorded the standard, If You Knew Susie, for Columbia Records. There was none classier.

1927 - William P. MacCracken, Jr. earned license number ‘1’ when the Department of Commerce issued the first aviator’s license.

1931 - Little Orphan Annie, the comic strip character developed by Harold Gray, came to life on the NBC Blue network. About 5 decades later, the comic strip inspired a Broadway play and a movie, both titled, Annie.

1945 - This is Your FBI debuted on ABC radio. Frank Lovejoy served as narrator for the following eight years.

1956 - Capitol Tower, the home of Capitol Records in Hollywood, CA, was dedicated. The building was the first circular office tower designed in America. It is 13 stories tall and 92 feet in diameter. At night, a light at the tip of the tower blinks the letters "H-O-L-L-Y-W-O-O-D" in Morse Code.

1957 - Trolley cars in New York City completed their final runs on this day.

1958 - Arnold Palmer won his first major pro golf tournament by capturing the Masters in Augusta, GA (and the coveted green jacket). Palmer defeated defending champion Dough Ford for the honor. Palmer was 28 years old and had been a pro since 1954 after he won the National Amateur title.

1959 - Hal Holbrook opened in the critically acclaimed, off-Broadway presentation of Mark Twain Tonight. Quotes from the famous humorist include: “It is best to read the weather forecast, before we pray for rain.”; “The more things are forbidden, the more popular they become.”; “Modesty died when clothes were born.”; “Be good and you will be lonesome.”; and “Familiarity breeds contempt -- and children.”

1959 - America’s funny men, Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis and Mort Sahl, and comedic actor Tony Randall, along with the Great Britain’s outstanding actors, David Niven and Laurence Olivier, entertained the guests of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Science at the 31st Annual Academy Awards ceremony. The audience filled the RKO Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles with applause for the Best Picture of 1958: Gigi (Arthur Freed, producer). Gigi also won Oscars for Best Director Vincente Minnelli; for Frederick Loewe’s (music), and Alan Jay Lerner’s (lyrics) for the Song, Gigi; for Best Music/Scoring of a Musical Picture (André Previn); for the Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Alan Jay Lerner); for Best Cinematography/Color (Joseph Ruttenberg); for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Black-and-White or Color (William A. Horning, E. Preston Ames, Henry Grace, F. Keogh Gleason); for Best Costume Design/Black-and-White or Color (Cecil Beaton); and for Best Film Editing (Adrienne Fazan). One would think there weren’t any awards leftover for any other movies. But, the Best Actor award went to David Niven for Separate Tables as did the Best Supporting Actress Oscar (Wendy Hiller). Susan Hayward was honored for her Best Actress role in I Want to Live! and Best Supporting Actor was Burl Ives in The Big Country. Other notable movies of 1958 ... some award winners, some not ... Auntie Mame, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Old Man and the Sea, Some Came Running, Teacher’s Pet, South Pacific, The Young Lions, Bell, Book and Candle, Vertigo, Damn Yankees, Marjorie Morningstar, and The Defiant Ones.

1971 - Rolling Stones Records was formed to promote the hits of The Rolling Stones. The famous Stones trademark, the lips logo, became widely used. Brown Sugar was the first hit by the Rolling Stones on the new label, followed by Wild Horses, Tumbling Dice and Bill Gates’ favorite song, Start Me Up.

1973 - The Stylistics received a gold record for their ballad hit, Break Up to Make Up. The Philadelphia soul group placed 10 hits on the pop charts in the 1970s. More of their gold record winners include: You Are Everything, Betcha By Golly Wow, I’m Stone in Love With You and You Make Me Feel Brand New.

1974 - The first concert film featuring a soundtrack in quadraphonic sound opened -- at the Ziegfeld Theatre. Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones turned out to be a ‘stone’ smash.

1985 - The country group, Alabama, went five-for-five as the album 40 Hour Week grabbed the top spot on the Billboard country chart. The group had a number one album for each of the previous five years. The popularity of the quartet (three are cousins from Fort Payne, AL) continues today.

1987 - Boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard won a 2-1 decision in a stunning upset over Marvelous Marvin Hagler in a bout held in Las Vegas, NV.

Birthdays
April 6th.



1483 - Raphael Santi
artist: Marriage of the Virgin, School of Athens; died Apr 6, 1520 [on his 37th birthday]

1882 - Rose Schneiderman
U.S. women’s rights activist: organized 1913 strike of 25,000 women blouse makers & ILGWU (International Ladies Garment Workers Union); president of WTUL; only woman member of F.D.R.’s Labor Advisory Board; died Aug 11, 1972

1884 - Walter Huston (Houghston)
Academy Award-winning actor: Treasure of the Sierra Madre [1948]; Duel in the Sun, December 7th: The Movie; died Apr 7, 1950

1892 - Lowell Thomas
broadcaster, journalist; died Aug 29, 1981; see Lowell Thomas Day [above]

1916 - ‘Pappy’ Wade Ray
country entertainer/musician: Grand Ol’ Opry; died Nov 11, 1998

1923 - Herb Thomas
NASCAR auto racer: champ: 48 NASCAR Winston Cup wins during his driving career: Grand National [1951, 1953], first to win three Southern 500’s [1951, 1954, 1955]; seriously injured in Shelby, NC race ending his racing career [Oct 1956]; died Aug 9, 2000

1924 - Dorothy Donegan
jazz pianist: At the Embers; appeared in film: Sensations of 1945; died May 19, 1998

1927 - Gerry Mulligan
jazz musician, composer: Disc Jockey Jump, Boplicity, Venus de Milo, Godchild; died Jan 20, 1996

1928 - Joi Lansing (Joyce Wassmansdoff)
actress: Easter Parade, Singin’ in the Rain, The Merry Widow, Big Foot; died Aug 7, 1972

1929 - André (Ludwig) Previn
pianist, composer; Oscar-winning film scores: Gigi, Porgy and Bess, Irma La Douce, My Fair Lady; conductor: Pittsburgh Symphony, London & LA Philharmonic Orchestras

1937 - Merle Haggard
CMA Entertainer and Male Vocalist of the Year: [1970]; songwriter: Okie from Muskogee, If We Make It Through December, Hungry Eyes, Workin’ Man Blues, Mama Tried

1937 - Billy Dee (December) Williams
actor: Brian’s Song, Lady Sings the Blues, The Return of the Jedi, Batman, The Imposter, The Empire Strikes Back, Alien Intruder, Mahogany

1938 - Roy Thinnes
actor: From Here to Eternity, The Invaders, Outer Limits, The Hindenburg, Code Name: Diamond Head

1942 - Barry Levinson
Academy Award-winning director: Rain Man [1988]; Disclosure, Bugsy, Good Morning, Vietnam, The Natural, Diner; director, writer: Toys, Avalon, Tin Men; writer: Best Friends, Inside Moves, And Justice for All, High Anxiety, Silent Movie; Emmy Award-winning writer: The Carol Burnett Show [1974, 1975]; Emmy Award-winning producer: Displaced Person, American Playhouse [1985]; Emmy Award-winning Director: Gone for Goode, Homicide-Life on the Street

1943 - Marty (Martin William) Pattin
baseball: pitcher: California Angels, Seattle Pilots, Milwaukee Brewers [all-star: 1971], Boston Red Sox, KC Royals [World Series: 1980]

1944 - John Huarte
football: Notre Dame, Heisman Trophy [1964], Chicago Bears

1944 - Michelle Phillips (Holly Michelle Gilliam)
singer: group: The Mamas and the Papas: California Dreamin’, Monday, Monday, I Saw Her Again, Words of Love, Dedicated to the One I Love, Creeque Alley; actress: The Last Movie, Dillinger, Knot’s Landing

1944 - John Stax
musician: bass: group: The Pretty Things: Rosalyn Don’t Bring Me Down, Honey I Need; LP: The Pretty Things

1947 - John Ratzenberger
actor: Cheers; The Empire Strikes Back, Timestalkers, Camp Cucamonga: How I Spent My Summer Vacation, John Ratzenberger’s Made in America

1951 - Bert Blyleven
baseball: pitcher: Minnesota Twins [AL Rookie Pitcher of the Year: 1970/all-star: 1973], Texas Rangers, Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1979], Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1985], Minnesota Twins [World Series: 1987], California Angels [Comeback Player of Year - 1989]

1952 - Marilu Henner (Mary Lucy Denise Pudlowski)
actress: Taxi, Evening Shade, Cannonball Run 2

1953 - Janet Lynn (Nowicki)
ice skater: Olympic bronze medalist [1972]; Ice Follies; won first U.S. Professional Championship [1973]

1962 - Stan Cullimore
songwriter, musician: guitar: group: The Housemartins

1969 - Ari Meyers
actress: Author! Author!, Kate & Allie, Think Big, Dark Horse

1972 - Jason Hervey
actor: The Wonder Years, Wildside, Fast Times, Diff’rent Strokes, Back to School, Back to the Future.

Chart Toppers
April 6th.

1944 It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
Besame Mucho - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Bob Eberly & Kitty
Kallen
I Love You - Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Please, Mr. Sun - Johnnie Ray
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Puppy Love - Paul Anka
Sink the Bismarck - Johnny Horton
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay - Otis Redding
Young Girl - The Union Gap
La - La - Means I Love You - The Delfonics
How Long Will My Baby Be Gone - Buck Owens

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Sweet Thing - Rufus featuring Chaka Khan
You’ll Lose a Good Thing - Freddy Fender

1984 Footloose - Kenny Loggins
Here Comes the Rain Again - Eurythmics
Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Let’s Stop Talkin’ About It - Janie Fricke


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. Also a big thank you to, Admin. Steve for letting me have this thread as a, Sticky. :)

Enjoy everyone. :)

ShadowThomas
04-06-2007, 11:05 PM
97th day of 2007 - 268 remaining.

Saturday, April 7, 2007
SOUTH PACIFIC DAY. :)

The Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein musical classic of love and war, South Pacific, unfolded on a lush tropical island swarming with Seabees, nurses, natives and coconut trees on this night in 1949. Actually, it was not a tropical island, but the stage of the Majestic Theatre in New York City.

Ezio Pinza starred as the suave French plantation owner with a shady past and Mary Martin portrayed the bubbly, pretty, but naive Navy nurse. Mary Martin washed her hair a zillion times as she sang, I’m Gonna Wash that Man Right Out of My Hair in 1,925 performances.

1950 Tony Awards went to the show and its producers, performers, director (Joshua Logan) and composers nine statuettes. It also earned a Pulitzer Prize in the same year and in 1958 was made into a movie.

South Pacific caused a lot of Happy Talk and this night, so many years ago, was certainly Some Enchanted Evening.

Events
April 7th.

1864 - The first camel race in America was held. Nope -- not in the Mojave Desert; but in Sacramento, California.

1888 - P.F. Collier published a weekly periodical for the first time. Collier’s later became the publication’s name. The magazine was popular for 69 years.

1928 - A 45-year-old retired goalie by the name of Lester Patrick stepped in to save a game for the New York Rangers, following an injury to the Rangers’ regular goaltender. The Rangers went on to beat Montreal and win the Stanley Cup in this, the final game of the series.

1940 - Booker T. Washington became the first black to be pictured on a U.S. postage stamp. His likeness was issued on a 10-cent stamp this day.

1954 - Gee, by The Crows, became the first rhythm and blues single to gain attention on pop music charts. Gee, written by William Davis, the baritone of The Crows, made it to #17 on the pop music chart and stayed for one week. This was also one of the first songs by a black group to be played on white radio stations. The Crows came together in the late 1940s in New York City, singing on street corners. Daniel ‘Sonny’ Norton (lead singer), Harold Major (tenor), Gerald Hamilton (bass) and Davis entered a talent contest at the Apollo Theatre and that was the beginning of their recording career. The group split up in the late 1950s.

1956 - Arthur Hailey had a script accepted and presented just 20 days after it was submitted to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The drama, Flight into Danger, had an unprecedented audience response. A number of years later, Arthur Hailey also wrote the best-selling novel, Airport; which was then adapted for the popular movie by the same title.

1963 - Jack Nicklaus became the youngest golfer to win the Green Jacket at the Masters Tournament. The ‘Golden Bear’ earned the win at one of golf’s premier events at the age of 23.

1970 - John Wayne, a movie veteran of over 200 films, won his first and only Oscar. The Duke earned an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in True Grit, also starring Kim Darby and Glen Campbell. It is estimated that movie-goers paid over $500 million to see John Wayne in his many films which include: The Big Trail, Reap the Wild Wind, The Long Voyage Home, Red River, The Quiet Man and The Sands of Iwo Jima (the only other film to earn him an Oscar nomination).

1970 - If you weren’t lucky enough to be at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in LA on this night, you were probably watching the 42nd Annual Academy Awards ceremonies on TV. John Wayne, a movie veteran of over 200 films, won his only Oscar: Best Actor for his role in True Grit. It is estimated that movie-goers paid over $500 million to see John Wayne in his many films which include: The Big Trail, Reap the Wild Wind, The Long Voyage Home, Red River, The Quiet Man and The Sands of Iwo Jima (the only other film to earn him an Oscar nomination). Another movie veteran, Cary Grant, received his only Oscar this same night. It was an honorary award for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues. (Grant had been nominated for Best Actor in Penny Serenade [1941] and None but the Lonely Heart [1944].) Other Oscar firsts at this celebration of the films of 1969 went to: Burt Bacharach for Best Music, Original Score for a Motion Picture/not a Musical (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid) and for Best Music/Song (Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, the award shared with Hal David/lyrics); Maggie Smith, Best Actress in Prime of Miss Jean Brodie; Gig Young, Best Supporting Actor in They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?; Goldie Hawn, Best Supporting Actress in Cactus Flower; John Schlesinger, Best Director for Midnight Cowboy. As in most Academy Award ceremonies, the picture with the Best Director also won the top prize, Best Picture: Midnight Cowboy (Jerome Hellman, producer).

1973 - Vicki Lawrence got her number one single as The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia made it to the top of the pop charts on this day. Lawrence had become well known as the comedienne who played Eunice’s mother on The Carol Burnett Show and Mama’s Family.

1977 - In the first American League game played outside the United States, Toronto’s Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox 9-5 at Exhibition Stadium in Toronto.

1979 - Ken Forsch of Houston pitched a no-hitter over the Atlanta Braves, 6-0. Forsch walked only two batters. It was the earliest no-hitter ever pitched in a baseball season. He and his brother, Bob, a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals, were the only brothers to ever pitch no-hitters in the big leagues. Bob threw a no-hitter on April 16, 1978.

1984 - Jack Morris of the Detroit Tigers tied the record for the earliest no-hitter in a season when he whipped Chicago 4-0. A national television audience saw Morris strike out eight batters and walk six in the first no-hitter thrown in Comiskey Park, Chicago, in 17 years.

1985 - Prince ended his 32-city tour and said that he was withdrawing from live performances for “an indeterminate number of years.” The last city on the tour was Miami, FL. He meant it so much, he even changed his a symbol and the name TAFKAP (The Artist Formerly Known As Prince).

1985 - Herschel Walker of the New Jersey Generals broke the single-game rushing mark in the United States Football League (USFL). He gained 233 yards while leading the Generals past Houston 31-25.

Birthdays
April 7th.

1770 - William Wordsworth
poet: The Prelude: Growth of a Poet’s Mind; died Apr 23, 1850

1786 - William King
13th U.S. Vice President: 1st VP to have served in both the House of Representatives and the Senate; took the only presidential or vice presidential oath ever administered outside of the United States [Havana, Cuba]; died Apr 18, 1853 [a month after taking that oath]

1873 - John (Joseph) ‘Mugsy’ McGraw
‘Little Napoleon’: Baseball Hall of Famer: Baltimore Orioles [1891-1899/champs: 1894-1897], SL Cardinals [1900], Baltimore Orioles [1901-1902], NY Giants [1902-1906]; manager: NY Giants: most World Series losses [6]; former baseball commissioner; died Feb 25, 1934

1897 - Walter Winchell
vaudeville performer, journalist, gossip columnist: New York Mirror, radio commentator: “Good evening, Mr. and Mrs. America and all the ships at sea.”; died Feb 20, 1972

1908 - Percy Faith
Grammy Award-winning orchestra leader, composer: The Theme from "A Summer Place" [1960]; My Heart Cries for You [Guy Mitchell hit], Delicado, Song from Moulin Rouge, Theme for Young Lovers; died Feb 9, 1976

1915 - Billie Holiday (Eleanora Fagan)
‘Lady’: jazz singer: Lover Man, They Can’t Take that Away from Me, Fine and Mellow, Don’t Explain, Strange Fruit, God Bless the Child; died July 17, 1959

1917 - Mongo (Ramon) Santamaria
bandleader, composer, musician: conga drums: Afro Blue, Watermelon Man; appeared in film: Made in Paris; played with Perez Prado and Tito Puente; died Feb 1, 2003

1919 - Ralph Flanagan
pianist/arranger: Sammy Kaye, Blue Barron, Charlie Barnet, Gene Krupa, Tony Pastor, Boyd Raeburn, Alvino Rey, Tony Martin, Mindy Carson, Perry Como Supper Club radio show; bandleader: Nevertheless, Rag Mop, Harbor Lights, Slow Poke, Hot Toddy; theme song: Singing Winds

1920 - Ravi Shankar
sitarist: played at Woodstock [1969] and with George Harrison in the Bangla-Desh Benefit concerts [1971]; was George Harrison’s sitar teacher; was resident lecturer at CCNY

1928 - James Garner (James Scott Bumgarner)
actor: Rockford Files, Maverick, The Americanization of Emily, Victor/Victoria, Tank, A Man Called Sledge, Duel at Diablo, The Distinguished Gentleman, My Fellow Americans, Space Cowboys

1931 - Daniel Ellsberg
author: known for releasing Pentagon Papers to the NY Times

1933 - Wayne Rogers
actor: M*A*S*H, Cool Hand Luke, Passion in Paradise, Pocket Money, The Killing Time, Chiefs, The Gig

1935 - Bobby Bare
Grammy Award-winning country singer: Detroit City [1964]; All America Boy [as Bill Parsons], Shame on Me, 500 Miles Away from Home; actor: A Distant Trumpet

1937 - Gail Cogdill
football: Detroit Lions [one of the Lion’s all-time receiving champs], Baltimore Colts

1938 - Spencer Dryden
musician: drums: group: Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship: Somebody to Love, White Rabbit; died Jan 11, 2005

1939 - Francis Ford Coppola
Academy Award-winning director: The Godfather: Part II [1974], screenwriter: Patton [1970], The Godfather [1973], The Godfather: Part II [1974]; The Godfather: Part III, Apocalypse Now, Finian’s Rainbow, Peggy Sue Got Married

1939 - David Frost
TV host: That Was the Week that Was, The David Frost Show

1943 - Mick Abrahams
musician: guitar: groups: Blodwyn Pig; Jethro Tull: Serenade to a Cuckoo

1947 - Patricia Bennett
singer: The Chiffons: Tonight’s the Night, He’s So Fine, One Fine Day, A Love So Fine, I Have a Boyfriend, Sweet Talkin’ Guy

1949 - John Oates
songwriter, singer: group: Hall and Oates: She’s Gone, Sara Smile, Rich Girl, I Can’t Go for That, Private Eyes, Maneater

1951 - Janis Ian (Fink)
Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter: At Seventeen [1975]; Society’s Child

1952 - Bruce Gary
musician: drums: group: The Knack: My Sharona, Good Girls Don’t, Baby Talks Dirty

1954 - Tony Dorsett
Pro Football Hall Famer: University of Pittsburgh: career record: for yards gained: Heisman Trophy winner [1976]; Dallas Cowboys running back: Super Bowls XII, XIII

1960 - James ‘Buster’ Douglas
boxing champion: defeated Mike Tyson.

Chart Toppers
April 7th.


1945 My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
A Little on the Lonely Side - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Jimmy
Brown)
Shame on You - Spade Cooley

1953 Pretend - Nat King Cole
Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
I Believe - Frankie Laine
Your Cheatin’ Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Blue Moon - The Marcels
Apache - Jorgen Ingmann
On the Rebound - Floyd Cramer
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Dizzy - Tommy Roe
Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
You’ve Made Me So Very Happy - Blood, Sweat & Tears
Who’s Gonna Mow Your Grass - Buck Owens

1977 Rich Girl - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Dancing Queen - Abba
Don’t Give Up on Us - David Soul
Lucille - Kenny Rogers

1985 One More Night - Phil Collins
We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Country Girls - John Schneider


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-07-2007, 11:25 PM
98th day of 2007 - 267 remaining.

Happy Easter everyone here @ WS. :)

Sunday, April 8, 2007
GET ALONG LITTLE DOGIE DAY. :)

Godshall Ranch, Apple Valley, California was the site of the first Intercollegiate Rodeo on this day in 1939.

The students who competed came from just about every major college and university campus in the western United States. The young cowboys and cowgirls competed under the guidance of world champion professional cowboys. Assisting were Harry Carey, Dick Foran, Curley Fletcher, Tex Ritter and Errol Flynn. These stars were used to performing their own rodeo tricks. There were no stunt men or stunt women in those days. The Hollywood stars roped their own little dogies.

The competition was such a success and drew so much attention that it sparked the creation of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association now headquartered in Walla Walla, Washington.

Coincidentally, the ‘Father of Canadian Rodeo’ was born in 1872 on this day in Payson, Utah. O. Raymond Knight produced Canada’s first rodeo, Raymond Stampede in 1902. A year later, he built the first grandstand for rodeo fans and the first chute to channel riders and their steeds as they enter the arena.

Events
April 8th.


1834 - Cornelius Lawrence became the first mayor to be elected by popular vote in a city election. The voters of New York City decided to make him mayor of their fair city.

1873 - Alfred Paraf of New York City patented the first successful oleomargarine.

1911 - The first squash tournament was played at the Harvard Club in New York City.

1941 - Earle Graser, the eight-year voice of the radio program, The Lone Ranger, died in an auto accident. Brace Beemer, previously the show’s announcer, took over the title role and stayed on the air for 14 years.

1943 - Wendell Wilkie’s One World was published for the first time. In less than two months, sales reached a million copies.

1957 - Jimmy Dean began a morning show on CBS-TV to compete with the first 45 minutes of the Today show on NBC-TV. No, he didn’t stand around in an apron cookin’ sausage and singing Big Bad John for the audience, though it may not have been a bad idea. No sponsors were found for the show and it was back to the smokehouse for Jimmy when CBS quickly sliced the show from the network.

1963 - Steve Brooks became only the fifth race jockey to ride 4,000 career winners.

1963 - Seven Oscars including the #1 award for Best Picture went to Lawrence of Arabia (Sam Spiegel, producer) at the 35th Annual Academy Awards at Santa Monica’s Civic Auditorium (Los Angeles). The epic production earned Oscars for David Lean (Best Director); Freddie Young (Best Cinematography/Color); John Box, John Stoll, & Dario Simoni (Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Color); John Cox with Shepperton SSD (Best Sound); Anne V. Coates (Best Film Editing); Maurice Jarre (Best Music/Score - Substantially Original). Ol’ Blue Eyes hosted the festivities honoring the films of 1962 (including the film Sinatra starred in, The Manchurian Candidate.) Other notable flicks of that year including some award winners, and some not: Taras Bulba, Mutiny on the Bounty, Walk on the Wild Side, The Longest Day, The Music Man, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Birdman of Alcatraz. Those that won the top awards other than Lawrence of Arabia were To Kill a Mockingbird (Best Actor - Gregory Peck; Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Black-and-White - Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead, Oliver Emert; Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium - Horton Foote); The Miracle Worker (Best Actress - Anne Bancroft, Best Supporting Actress - Patty Duke) ; Sweet Bird of Youth (Best Supporting Actor - Ed Begley); and Days of Wine and Roses [title song] (Best Music/Song: - Henry Mancini (music), Johnny Mercer lyrics).

1968 - The Beatles went gold again, receiving a gold record for the single, Lady Madonna.

1969 - The Montreal Expos and the New York Mets played in Shea Stadium in New York in the first international baseball game in the major leagues.

1971 - Chicago became the first rock group to play Carnegie Hall in New York City. Through the 1970s and 1980s, Chicago scored big with these hits: Make Me Smile, 25 or 6 to 4, Saturday in the Park, Old Days, Baby, What a Big Surprise, Hard to Say I’m Sorry and many others.

1974 - It was one historic night in sports in Atlanta’s Fulton County Stadium. Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s home run record by collecting his 715th round-tripper. Hammerin’ Hank trotted into baseball immortality as the Braves beat the Los Angeles Dodgers, 7 to 4. Aaron finished his career two years later with 755 home runs; a record that still stands. When he retired from baseball, Hank Aaron also held a first place record for RBIs.

1975 - The Godfather: Part II won half of the top six awards at the 47th Annual Academy Awards at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. It won for Best Picture: (Francis Ford Coppola, Gray Frederickson, Fred Roos, producers); Best Director (Francis Ford Coppola); and Best Supporting Actor (Robert De Niro); plus Best Writing/Screenplay Adapted from Other Material (Francis Coppola, Mario Puzo); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Dean Tavoularis, Angelo P. Graham, George Nelson; and Best Music/Original Dramatic Score (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola). The other three crowd-pleaser awards went to Best Actor Art Carney for his Harry and Tonto role; to Best Actress Ellen Burstyn for her part in Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore; and to Ingrid Bergman as Best Supporting Actress in Murder on the Orient Express. Hosts Sammy Davis Jr., Bob Hope, Shirley MacLaine, and Frank Sinatra livened up the party, even though murder, intrigue and disaster were in the run. The award for Best Music/Song went to Al Kasha & Joel Hirschhorn for We May Never Love Like This Again from the Towering Inferno. Inferno also won for Best Cinematography (Fred J. Koenekamp, Joseph F. Biroc) and Best Film Editing (Harold F. Kress & Carl Kress); while Best Sound went to Earthquake (Ronald Pierce and Melvin M. Metcalfe, Sr.) and Robert Towne’s Chinatown won for Best Writing/Original Screenplay.

1985 - Comedienne Phyllis Diller underwent a surgical procedure for permanent eye liner to eliminate the need for eyelid makeup. Must have been a real sloooow day over at Phyllis’ house.

1986 - It took 18 years of singing the U.S. national anthem, but on this day, at long last, baritone Robert Merrill of the Metropolitan Opera became the first person to both sing the anthem and throw out the first ball at Yankee Stadium for the Yanks home opener.

Birthdays
April 8th.

563 B.C.- Buddha (Shakyamuni)
‘The Enlightened One’ in the Buddhist faith; died Feb 15, 483 B.C.

1872 - Ray (O. Raymond) Knight
‘Father of Canadian Rodeo’: conceived, coined, organized first Canadian stampede (rodeo); town of Raymond, Alberta Canada named for him; see Get Along Little Dogie Day [above]

1892 - Mary Pickford (Gladys Louise Smith)
Academy Award-winning actress: Coquette [1928-29], Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Stella Maris, The Taming of the Shrew, Pollyanna, A Poor Little Rich Girl; died May 29, 1979

1912 - Sonja Henie
ice skater: Norwegian Olympic gold medalist [1928, 1932, 1936]; World Champion [1927 thru 1936]; died Oct 12, 1969

1918 - Elizabeth ‘Betty’ Ford (Bloomer)
First Lady: wife of 38th U.S. President Gerald R. Ford; founder of the Betty Ford Clinic for substance abuse rehabilitation

1921 - Franco (Dario) Corelli
tenor: debut: Spoleto (Italy) as Don José in G. Bizet’s Carmen [1951]; in films: Great Moments in Opera, Franco Corelli in Tosca, The Great Tenors - Voice of Firestone Classic Performances

1922 - Carmen McRae
jazz singer: The Next Time It Happens, Skyliner; died Nov 10, 1994

1923 - Edward Mulhare
actor: Megaforce, Our Man Flint, Von Ryan’s Express, Knight Rider; died May 24, 1997

1926 - Shecky Greene (Sheldon Greenfield)
comedian, Las Vegas nightclub performer; actor: Splash, Mel Brooks’ History of the World -- Part 1, Tony Rome, Laverne and Shirley, The A-Team, Northern Exposure

1927 - Charlie (Charles Richard) ‘Smokey’ Maxwell
baseball: Boston Red Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Detroit Tigers [all-star: 1956, 1957], Chicago White Sox

1928 - John Gavin (Anthony Golenour)
actor: Psycho, Spartacus, A Time to Love & a Time to Die, Sophia Loren: Her Own Story

1928 - Monty Sunshine
jazz musician: clarinet: Petite Fleur; played in film: Look Back in Anger

1929 - Jacques Brel
singer, songwriter: Jackie, Next, If You Go Away, I’m Not Afraid; appeared in his own French version of Man of La Mancha and in film: Montdragon; died Oct 9, 1978

1940 - John Havlicek
Basketball Hall of Famer: Boston Celtics [eight NBA championship teams: 1963-1966, 1968-1969, 1974, 1976/13 NBA All-Star Games: 1966-1978/four-time All-NBA First Team: 1971-74/five-time NBA All-Defensive First Team (1972-1976]; Celtics all-time leading scorer [26,395 points]

1941 - Peggy Lennon
singer: group: The Lennon Sisters: The Lawrence Welk Show

1942 - Roger Chapman
singer: groups: Shortlist, Streetwalkers, Family: Hung Up Down, The Weaver’s Answer, No Mule’s Fool, In My Own Time, Burlesque

1943 - John (Frederick) Hiller
baseball: pitcher: Detroit Tigers [World Series: 1968/all-star: 1974

1946 - Jim (James Augustus) ‘Catfish’ Hunter
baseball: pitcher: KC Athletics [all-star: 1966, 1967], Oakland Athletics [Cy Young Award- winner: 1974/all-star: 1970, 1972-1974/World Series: 1972-1974], NY Yankees [all-star: 1975, 1978/World Series: 1976-1978]; died Aug 9, 1999 [ALS: Lou Gehrig’s disease]

1946 - Stuart Pankin
actor: The San Pedro Beach Bums, No Soap Radio, Nearly Departed, Knots Landing, Falcon Crest, Not Necessarily the News, the voice of Earl Sinclair in Dinosaurs, Father and Scout, Irreconcilable Differences, Arachnophobia, Fatal Attraction, Dirt Bike Kid

1947 - Steve Howe
musician: guitar, singer: groups: Asia: Heat of the Moment, Only Time Will Tell; Bodast; Yes: Roundabouts; Tomorrow: My White Bicycle, Real Life Permanent Dream, Auntie Mary’s Dress Shop, An Excerpt from a Teenage Opera, Sam

1960 - John (Richard) Schneider
actor: Second Chances, Heaven Help Us, Grand Slam, Dukes of Hazzard, Night of the Twisters, Texas, Speed Zone, Stagecoach, Cocaine Wars, Smokey and the Bandit

1963 - Julian Lennon
singer: Valotte, Too Late for Goodbyes; son of John and Cynthia Lennon

1968 - Patricia Arquette
actress: Medium, Flirting with Disaster, Holy Matrimony, True Romance, A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors; granddaughter of actor Cliff Arquette and sister of actress Roseanna Arquette.

Chart Toppers
April 8th.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Personality - Johnny Mercer
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Cross Over the Bridge - Patti Page
A Girl, A Girl - Eddie Fisher
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares
Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Slow Twistin’ - Chubby Checker
She’s Got You - Patsy Cline

1970 Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel
Let It Be - The Beatles
Instant Karma (We All Shine On) - John Ono Lennon
Tennessee Bird Walk - Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Ready for the Times to Get Better - Crystal Gayle

1986 Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. - John Cougar Mellencamp
Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
100% Chance of Rain - Gary Morris


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-08-2007, 11:00 PM
99th day of 2007 - 266 remaining.

Monday, April 9, 2007
3-D MOVIE DAY.

The year was 1953. Warner Brothers, the first of the major Hollywood studios to introduce 3-D motion pictures, chose this day to premiere The House of Wax at the Paramount Theatre in New York City. The stage show preceding the movie was headed by singer Eddie Fisher. The film’s stars, Vincent Price, Phyllis Kirk and Frank Lovejoy attended the premiere.

A precursor to Warner’s 3-D presentation occurred in 1922 when The Power of Love opened in Los Angeles. The feature-length movie was filmed in a stereoscopic process called Fairall.

The first official 3-D movie (viewed with special glasses), Bwana Devil, premiered in LA five months before the major studios got into the act. It starred Robert Stack and Barbara Britton. Although the critics panned the flick as “low-grade melodrama with Polaroid glasses,” the long lines at the box office convinced Warner and others to plan their own 3-D productions. In fact, 23 3-D films were released in 1953, The House of Wax being the first.

Events
April 9th.


1833 - Peterborough, NH opened the first municipally supported public library.

1872 - S.R. Percy of New York City received a patent for dried milk. Yummy!

1905 - The first aerial ferry bridge went into operation -- in Duluth, Minnesota.

1912 - The Boston Red Sox defeated Harvard 2-0 on this, the day that Fenway Park was opened for the first time. Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski, Carlton Fisk, Jim Rice, Roger Clemens, and Babe Ruth played ball at Fenway and faced the ‘Green Monster’, the huge wall in left field. Until the Humane Society ordered him to stop, Ted Williams used to take rifle shots at the many pigeons that flew around the stadium. In 1954, a ball thrown to stop a player from making a double out of a single, hit a pigeon in flight. Allegedly, the bird fell to the ground, got up and then flew away to safer territory. The ball deflected right to the second baseman, who put the tag on the runner.

1928 - Mae West made her glamorous debut on Broadway in the classic production of Diamond Lil.

1940 - Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra, along with singer Helen O’Connell, recorded Six Lessons from Madame La Zonga for Decca Records.

1947 - Branch Rickey of the Brooklyn Dodgers announced the purchase of the baseball contract that would bring slugger Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to the Dodgers from Montreal.

1950 - Bob Hope hosted a Star-Spangled Review on NBC-TV. Hope became the highest-paid performer for a single show on TV. The Star-Spangled Review was a musical special.

1953 - Cincinnati baseball officials said that the National League team wanted to be known as the Redlegs and not the Reds. This was understandable, with the McCarthy Hearings bringing to light the alleged infiltration of Communist reds in the United States in government, politics and entertainment.

1962 - President John F. Kennedy opened the Washington Senators’ baseball season by throwing out the first ball at the new D.C. Stadium (later to be known as Robert F. Kennedy Stadium [RFK]). The original Senators had left Washington for Minnesota in 1961. As part of the agreement to allow the Senators to move, an expansion team had to be granted to DC. The expansion Washington Senators moved to Texas and became the Rangers. The owner who moved the expansion team to Texas was Bob Short, a businessman from Minnesota. Short once ran for the Senate in Minnesota. Wouldn’t that have been interesting - the man who moved the Senators from DC might have moved into DC as a Senator!

1962 - Musicals and comedies led the list of award-winners and nominees at the 34th Annual Academy Awards held at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Los Angeles and hosted by comedian Bob Hope. The Broadway musical in the guise of a Hollywood film, West Side Story, was awarded the Oscar for Best Picture (Robert Wise, producer); Best Director (Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins); Best Supporting Actor and Actress (George Chakiris, Rita Moreno); Best Cinematography/Color (Daniel L. Fapp); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Color (Boris Leven, Victor A. Gangelin); Best Costume Design/Color (Irene Sharaff); Best Sound (Fred Hynes-Todd-AO SSD & Gordon Sawyer-Samuel Goldwyn SSD); Best Film Editing (Thomas Stanford); Best Music/Scoring of a Musical Picture (Saul Chaplin, Johnny Green, Sid Ramin, Irwin Kostal). Were their any golden statuettes left for any other flick? A few ... the Best Actor award went to Maximilian Schell for his role in Judgment at Nuremberg , and for the first time in Oscar history, the Best Actress award went to an actress in a foreign film, Sophia Loren for the lead in La Ciociara (or Two Women). The Hustler, Splendor in the Grass and The Guns of Navarone won a total of four Oscars. Now, back to musicals -- the Best Music/Song was Moon River (Henry Mancini-music, Johnny Mercer-lyrics) from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The list of comedic and musical movies from 1961 that were nominated but didn’t win is equally impressive: The Absent-Minded Professor, The Parent Trap, The Children’s Hour, Babes in Toyland, Pocketful of Miracles, Flower Drum Song, Fanny ... let’s all sing along with Barbra, now ...

1965 - TIME magazine featured a cover with the entire Peanuts gang on this day. It was a good day for Charlie Brown.

1965 - Major-league baseball played its first indoor game. President Lyndon B. Johnson attended the opening of the Astrodome in Houston, Texas. The indoor stadium was termed the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’.

1973 - Tommy Aaron became the second native son from Georgia to win the Masters golf title at Augusta. The first Georgian to accomplish the feat was Claude Harmon in 1948.

1977 - The Swedish pop group Abba made its debut at number one on the American pop charts, as Dancing Queen became the most popular record in the U.S.

1979 - Drama and war headlined the films winning most of the awards at the 51st Annual Academy Awards ceremony at Los Angeles’ Dorothy Chandler Pavilion (L.A. Music Center). The Best Picture, The Deer Hunter (Barry Spikings, Michael Deeley, Michael Cimino, John Peverall, producers), also won for Best Director (Michael Cimino); Best Supporting Actor (Christopher Walken); Best Film Editing (Peter Zinner); and Best Sound (Richard Portman, William McCaughey, Aaron Rochin, C. Darin Knight). The Best Actor and Actress awards for performances in Coming Home were awarded to Jon Voight and Jane Fonda, respectively. This 1978 film also won a golden statuette for Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Nancy Dowd, Waldo Salt, Robert C. Jones). The intense Midnight Express won for Best Music/Original Score (Giorgio Moroder)and Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Oliver Stone). On the lighter side, the Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role went to Maggie Smith in California Suite, the Best Music/Song Oscar, for Last Dance from Thank God It’s Friday, went to Paul Jabara, and Johnny Carson was the host.

1984 - Johnny Carson used his own terms of endearment to bring laughter to the TV audience and the audience in attendance at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. It was the 56th Annual Academy Awards, and Terms of Endearment (James L. Brooks, producer) was voted Best Picture of 1983. Terms also won for Best Director (James L. Brooks, again ... and, again for Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium);and Best Supporting Actor (Jack Nicholson); and for Best Actress (Shirley MacLaine). MacLaine had been nominated five times over 26 years before winning the statuette. Of course, since she could see into the future, she knew that this would happen. Robert Duvall picked up the Best Actor Award (Tender Mercies) and the Best Supporting Actress title was bestowed on Linda Hunt for The Year of Living Dangerously. A foreign film, Fanny & Alexander, won three Academy Awards: Best Costume Design (Marik Vos-Lundh), Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Anna Asp, Susanne Lingheim), & Best Cinematography (Sven Nykvist). Another film that endeared itself to audiences in 1983 was The Right Stuff, honored for Best Music/Original Score (Bill Conti); Best Effects/Sound Effects Editing (Jay Boekelheide); Best Film Editing (Glenn Farr, Lisa Fruchtman, Stephen A. Rotter, Douglas Stewart, Tom Rolf); and Best Sound (Mark Berger, Thomas Scott, Randy Thom, David MacMillan). Put the whole evening together and you get the Best Music/Song: Flashdance...What a Feeling (Giorgio Moroder-music, Keith Forsey and Irene Cara-lyrics) from the movie, Flashdance.

1985 - Tom Seaver broke a major-league baseball record (held by Walter Johnson) as he started his 15th opening-day game. The Chicago White Sox defeated the Milwaukee Brewers 4-2. With the win, ‘Tom Terrific’ extended his opening day record to 7-1. He had thrown openers for the New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds and the Chicago White Sox.

1988 - Singer Brook Benton died in New York of bacterial meningitis. He was 56. We remember Benton for many hits. Among them: It’s Just a Matter of Time, So Many Ways, Endlessly, Rainy Night in Georgia, and Baby (You’ve Got What It Takes) (w/Dinah Washington).

Birthdays
April 9th.

1883 - Frank King
cartoonist: creator of Gasoline Alley cartoon strip; died June 25, 1969

1898 - Paul Robeson
singer: Ol’ Man River; actor: The Emperor Jones, Show Boat, Othello, Porgy and Bess, The Hairy Ape, King Solomon’s Mines, Song of Freedom; died Jan 23, 1976

1903 - Ward (Wardell) Bond
actor: Wagon Train, Gone with the Wind, Drums Along the Mohawk, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Maltese Falcon, Mister Roberts, Rio Bravo, Tall in the Saddle, The Time of Your Life; died Nov 5, 1960

1906 - Antal Dorati
symphony orchestra conductor; died Nov 13, 1988

1916 - Julian Dash
jazz musician: tenor sax: No Soap, Midnight Stroll, Double Shot, Gin Mill Special, Weddin’ Blues, My Silent Love, Long Moan, Creamin’, Goin’ Along; died Feb 25, 1974

1920 - Art Van Damme
musician: accordionist: group: Art Van Damme Quintet

1926 - Jack Nichols
basketball: Boston Celtics

1926 - Hugh Hefner
publisher: Playboy magazine

1928 - Paul Arizin
Basketball Hall of Famer: NBA Silver Anniversary Team [1971]; Philadelphia Warriors: led league in scoring [1951-52] [1956-57]; NBA’s fifth player to score over 10,000

1928 - Tom Lehrer
songwriter: Vatican Rag, Werner Von Braun, The Old Dope Peddlar, Be Prepared, Lobachevsky, The Masochism Tango, New Math, National Brotherhood Week, I Wanna Go Back to Dixie, We Will All Go Together When We Go

1932 - Carl Perkins (Carl Lee Perkings)
singer: Blue Suede Shoes, Your True Love, Honey Don’t, Pink Pedal Pushers, Shine Shine, Cotton Top, Restless; inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987; died Jan 19, 1998

1933 - Jean-Paul Belmondo
actor: Casino Royale, The Brain, Is Paris Burning?, Swashbuckler, Le Magnifique, Love and the Frenchwoman

1935 - Avery Schreiber
comedian: half of comedy duo Burns & Schreiber; died Jan 7, 2002

1939 - Michael Learned
Emmy Award-winning actress: The Waltons [1972-73, 1973-74, 1975-76; Nurse [1981-82]; Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, All My Sons, Deadly Business, A Christmas Without Snow

1940 - Jim Roberts
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, SL Blues

1942 - (Andre) Brandon de Wilde
actor: Shane, Hud, In Harm’s Way, The Member of the Wedding, Goodbye My Lady, All Fall Down; killed in car crash July 6, 1972 [Denver CO: while en route to act in a stage play]

1943 - Terry Knight
singer: Groups: Terry Knight and the Pack: I Who Have Nothing; founded Grand Funk Railroad: On Time

1945 - Alden Roche
football: Green Bay Packers

1946 - Nate (Nathan) Colbert
baseball: Houston Astros, SD Padres [all-star: 1971-1973], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos, Oakland Athletics

1946 - Les Gray
singer: group: Mud: Tiger Feet, Lonely This Christmas, Oh Boy

1948 - Michel Parizeau
hockey: NHL: Philadelphia Flyers, SL Blues

1954 - Dennis Quaid
actor: Dragonheart, Wyatt Earp, Postcards from the Edge, Everybody’s All-American, The Right Stuff, Jaws 3, The Long Riders, Breaking Away, September 30, 1955, Switchback, Frequency, Traffic; songwriter, actor: The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia, Tough Enough, The Big Easy; brother of actor Randy Quaid

1957 - Severiano (Seve) Ballesteros
golf: youngest to win Harry Vardon Trophy [Paris: 1976]; won over thirty major golf tournaments on five continents; 54 PGA European Tour Tournaments, 14 International, 4 others

1961 - Mark Kelly
musician: keyboards: group: Marillion: Market Square Heroes, Grendel, Lavender, Heart of Lothian

1966 - Cynthia Nixon
actress: Let It Ride, Tanner, The Manhattan Project, Tattoo, Amadeus

1979 - Keshia Knight Pulliam
actress: The Cosby Show.

Chart Toppers
April 9th.

1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
How are Things in Glocca Morra - Buddy Clark
Managua, Nicaragua - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Don Rodney)
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
South Street - The Orlons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me) - The Temptations
For All We Know - Carpenters
What’s Going On - Marvin Gaye
After the Fire is Gone - Conway Twitty & Loretta Lynn

1979 I Will Survive - Gloria Gaynor
What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Sultans of Swing - Dire Straits
I Just Fall in Love Again - Anne Murray

1987 Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
Tonight, Tonight, Tonight - Genesis
Come Go with Me - Expose
Ocean Front Property - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-09-2007, 11:09 PM
100th day of 2007 - 265 remaining.

Tuesday, April 10, 2007
PGA DAY.

Inaugurated in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association (PGA) held its first championship tournament on this day. This first PGA Championship title went to Britisher, Jim Barnes. Barnes won the match-play event at Siwanoy golf course in Bronxville, NY and was presented with a trophy and the major share of the $2,580 purse.

Much has changed in the PGA since that spring day in 1916. The event was changed to a 72-hole, stroke-play game in 1958. The LPGA for women golfers was instituted in 1950 and the Senior PGA Tour for players 50 and older began in 1982.

Two players have won the title five times: Walter Hagen and Jack Nicklaus. Hagen also holds the record for most consecutive wins from 1924 through 1927. The lowest 72-hole total of 271 was garnered by Bobby Nichols in 1964. The honors of being the oldest champion belongs to Julius Boros. He won in 1968 at the age of 48 plus 140 days; while Gene Sarazen was given the title of youngest champion. In 1922, Gene was just 20 years and 173 days old when he took home the PGA title.

We won’t even mention what today’s PGA purses are worth. Fore!

Events
April 10th.

1849 - Walter Hunt of New York City patented the safety pin. Most of us still use the device which comes in a variety of sizes and is quite handy to have around. Mr. Hunt, however, didn’t think so. He thought the safety pin to be a temporary convenience and sold the patent for a total of $400. Bet he could just ‘stick’ himself for doing that.

1927 - Ballet Mécanique was presented for the first time at Carnegie Hall in New York City. This was the first symphonic work that called for an airplane propeller and other mechanical contraptions not normally associated with the ballet.

1937 - Collier’s magazine published two short stories this day which would later become motion pictures; a first for a single magazine issue. Stage to Lordsburg, written by Ernest Haycox, was made into the 1939 film classic, Stagecoach, starring John Wayne. Hagar Wilde’s story was turned into a movie that reflected the title of his work, Bringing Up Baby. The 1938 film starred Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.

1953 - Eddie Fisher was discharged from the Army and arrived home to a nice paycheck of $330,000 in record royalties. Fisher sold 7 million records for RCA Victor while on furloughs. Anytime was just one of several hits recorded during his stint in the Army.

1958 - Dick Clark devoted an hour of his American Bandstand afternoon TV show to the memory of Chuck Willis who had died earlier in the day from peritonitis. Willis was from Atlanta, GA and recorded hits that included: C.C. Rider, Betty and Dupree, What Am I Living For (his biggest hit) and Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Willis was a noted rhythm and blues singer and songwriter of the early rock era.

1961 - Gary Player of South Africa became the first foreign golfer to win the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, Georgia. Player, age 25, won by just one stroke over both Charles Coe, an amateur, and defending champion Arnold Palmer. Coe shot a record 280, which was the lowest score turned in by an amateur at the Masters up to that time.

1967 - Bob Hope was the host/referee as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf and A Man for All Seasons duked it out at the 39th Annual Academy Awards. The arena was the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles. Virginia Woolf came loaded with 13 nominations, her opponent, A Man for All Seasons, was the underdog with 8. At first it was blow for blow, Virginia Woolf winning Best Costume Design/Black-and-White (Irene Sharaff) and Seasons winning the award in the Color category (Joan Bridge and Elizabeth Haffenden); Seasons winning Best Cinematography/Color (Ted Moore) and Virginia Woolf winning in the Black-and-White division (Haskell Wexler). Then Virgina Woolf won for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration, Black-and-White (George James Hopkins, Richard Sylbert) while Seasons took the Oscar for Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Robert Bolt). They were tied. Best Supporting Actress: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (Sandy Dennis), but Best Supporting Actor went to Walter Matthau in The Fortune Cookie. Virginia Woolf, ahead by one. The Best Music/Song Oscar went to Born Free (John Barry-music, Don Black-lyrics) from the movie of the same title. The fight was still on since neither Seasons nor Virginia Woolf was nominated in that category. It was time for the Academy Award for Best Actress. And the Oscar goes to Elizabeth Taylor for Who’s Afraid of Virginnia Woolf. The 1966 movie about bad marriages and booze was now two ahead. Would the drama about Thomas More garner a Best Actor Oscar for Paul Scofield? Yes! Two awards left ... Would it be Mike Nichols, director of Virginia Woolf or Fred Zinnemann. Fred Zinnemann wins for Seasons and the two are tied. The envelope holding the title of the Best Picture of 1966 revealed the overall winner as A Man for All Seasons, Fred Zinnemann, producer.

1968 - This was not the usual Monday night Oscar celebration at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in LA. In fact, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences postponed the 40th Annual Academy Awards ceremonies two days because of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. Ironically, the Best Picture of 1967, In the Heat of the Night (Walter Mirisch, producer), and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (Best Actress: Katharine Hepburn) and Best Writing/Story and Screenplay/Written Directly for the Screen (William Rose), have racial themes. Heat won four more Oscars that evening: Best Actor (Rod Steiger); Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Stirling Silliphant); Best Sound (Samuel Goldwyn SSD); Best Film Editing (Hal Ashby). Bob Hope, as host, livened up the somber ceremonies as did awards for Best Supporting Actor George Kennedy (Cool Hand Luke), Best Supporting Actress Estelle Parsons (Bonnie and Clyde); Best Music/Song, Talk to the Animals from Doctor Dolittle (Leslie Bricusse). Mike Nichols who lost to The Man for All Seasons the previous year, won this time, as Best Director for The Graduate. Other serious contenders for the golden statuette were: Casino Royale, Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Dirty Dozen, Divorce American Style, Camelot, The Jungle Book, Far from the Madding Crowd, Valley of the Dolls, In Cold Blood, Barefoot in the Park. Some were winners, some not so lucky.

1970 - Officially resigning from The Beatles, Paul McCartney disbanded the most influential rock group in history at a public news conference. The Beatles hit, Let It Be, was riding high on the pop charts. The last recording for the group, The Long and Winding Road (also from the documentary film Let It Be), would be number one for two weeks beginning on June 13, bringing to a close one of contemporary music’s greatest dynasties.

1972 - Once again, the 44th Annual Academy Awards celebration was held at Los Angeles’ Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. And, once again, everyone was spellbound waiting to hear who won Best Picture. It wasn’t an easy decision. The nominees were: A Clockwork Orange, Fiddler on the Roof, The Last Picture Show, Nicholas and Alexandra and The French Connection. And the Oscar goes to ... The French Connection, Philip D’Antoni, producer. The Oscar also went to The French Connection for Best Director (William Friedkin); Best Actor (Gene Hackman); Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Ernest Tidyman); and Best Film Editing (Gerald B. Greenberg). All of the other Best Picture nominees (except A Clockwork Orange) also received Oscars: The Last Picture Show won for both supporting actor and actress (Ben Johnson and Cloris Leachman respectively); Fiddler on the Roof won for Best Cinematography (Oswald Morris), Best Sound (Gordon K. McCallum, David Hildyard) and Best Music/Scoring Adaptation/Original Song Score (John Williams); Nicholas and Alexandra won the awards for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (John Box, Ernest Archer, Jack Maxsted, Gil Parrondo, Vernon Dixon) and Best Costume Design (Yvonne Blake, Antonio Castillo). Klute won one out of its two nominations: Best Actress (Jane Fonda) and Shaft won its only nomination: Best Music/Song (Isaac Hayes, Theme from Shaft. Other films from 1971 that received accolades ... but not necessarily Oscars: Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory; Sunday Bloody Sunday; Carnal Knowledge; Summer of ’42, Bedknobs and Broomsticks; Mary, Queen of Scots; and McCabe & Mrs. Miller. And much applause went to the hosts of the evening’s festivities: Helen Hayes, Alan King, Sammy Davis Jr., and Jack Lemmon.

1985 - Relief pitcher, Dan Quisenberry was signed by the Kansas City Royals to a contract that promised he would “...never wear another uniform.” The lifetime pact was worth $43 million, after taxes, over a 40-year period. Quisenberry became known as the ‘Fireman’, for putting out late-inning fires and saving games for the Royals. The contract made him the game’s highest-paid reliever.

1985 - Eddie Murphy’s Beverly Hills Cop made it to the top ten on the list of top-grossing motion pictures. The film, at number nine on the list, was the only R-rated and non-summer movie to make the list.

Birthdays
April 10th.


1829 - William Booth
founder of the Salvation Army; author: In Darkest England, The Way Out; died Aug 20, 1912

1847 - Joseph Pulitzer
publisher: St. Louis Dispatch, New York World; died in 1911: his will left $2 million for establishment of school of journalism at Columbia Univ. and a fund which established annual prizes for literature, drama, music and journalism; died Oct 29, 1911

1882 - Frances Perkins (Mrs. Paul Caldwell Wilson)
first woman U.S. presidential cabinet member: Secretary of Labor [1933-1945]; died May 14, 1965

1885 - Bernard Gimbel
merchant: Gimbel’s Department Stores; died Sep 29, 1966

1911 - Martin Denny
composer, arranger, pianist: Quiet Village, The Enchanted Sea; died Mar 2, 2005

1915 - Harry Morgan (Bratsburg)
Emmy Award-winning actor: M*A*S*H [1979-80]; Dragnet, You Can’t Take It with You, Pete and Gladys, HEC Ramsey, December Bride, The D.A., Aftermash

1917 - Robert Woodward
Nobel Prize-winning scientist [1965]: study of the molecular structure of complex organic compounds; died July 8, 1979

1921 - Chuck (Kevin Joseph) Connors
actor: The Rifleman, Roots, The Yellow Rose, Werewolf, Cowboy in Africa, Branded; host: Thrill Seekers; died Nov 10, 1992

1921 - Sheb Wooley
CMA comic of the Year [1968]; singer, songwriter: The Purple People Eater, Are You Satisfied, Hee Haw theme; actor: Rawhide, High Noon, Rocky Mountain, Giant, Hoosiers; died Sep 16, 2003

1929 - Max Von Sydow
actor: Dune, The Exorcist, The Seventh Seal, The Emigrants, Flash Gordon, Hannah and Her Sisters, Hawaii, The Quiller Memorandum, Quo Vadis, Three Days of the Condor

1932 - Omar Sharif (Michael Shalhoub)
actor: Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, Funny Girl, Funny Lady, Peter the Great, Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna, Beyond Justice, Crime & Passion

1934 - David Halberstam
author: The Best and the Brightest, The Summer of ’49

1936 - John Madden
football: San Diego State defensive coordinator; NFL: head coach: Oakland Raiders [103 wins, 32 losses, 7 ties]; TV sports broadcaster: CBS, FOX [11 Emmy Awards as Outstanding Sports Personality-Analyst]; author: Hey Wait a Minute, I Wrote a Book!, One Knee Equals Two Feet (and Everything Else You Wanted to Know About Football), One Size Doesn’t Fit All, All Madden, John Madden’s Ultimate Tailgate Cookbook; video game marketer: John Madden Football; fear of flying puts him on trains and his customized bus

1936 - Bobbie Smith
singer: group: The Spinners

1938 - ‘Dandy’ Don (Joe) Meredith
football: Dallas Cowboys; broadcaster: ABC Monday Night Football: “Turn out the lights -- the party’s over.”; actor: Terror on the 40th Floor, Sky Hei$t

1941 - Paul Edward Theroux
author: The Mosquito Coast, Millroy the Magician

1946 - Bob (Robert Jose) ‘Bull’ Watson
baseball: Houston Astros [all-star: 1973, 1975], Boston Red Sox, NY Yankees [World Series: 1981], Atlanta Braves

1947 - Bunny Livingston Wailer (Neville O’Riley)
musician: percussion, singer, songwriter: group: Bob Marley and the Wailers: Simmer Down, Rude Boy; solo: LPs: Blackheart Man, Protest, Sings the Wailers

1950 - Ken (George Kenneth) Griffey Sr.
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1975, 1976/all-star: 1976, 1977, 1980], NY Yankees, Atlanta Braves, Seattle Mariners; father of Ken Griffey Jr.; the first father-son combination to play in the major leagues at the same time

1951 - Steven Seagal
actor: Executive Decision, Under Siege series, On Deadly Ground, Out for Justice, Marked for Death, Hard to Kill, Above the Law

1954 - Peter MacNicol
actor: Dracula: Dead and Loving It, Addams Family Values, Ghostbusters 2, Sophie’s Choice, Dragon Slayer, Chicago Hope, The Powers that Be

1960 - Brian Setzer
musician: guitar, singer: The Stray Cats: Rock This Town, Stray Cat Strut, Runaway Boys.

Chart Toppers
April 10th.

1948 Manana - Peggy Lee
Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
(You’ve Got) The Magic Touch - The Platters
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Suspicion - Terry Stafford
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 A Horse with No Name - America
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Working My Way Back to You/Forgive Me, Girl - Spinners
Call Me - Blondie
Sugar Daddy - Bellamy Brothers

1988 Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car - Billy Ocean
Out of the Blue - Debbie Gibson
Devil Inside - INXS
Famous Last Words of a Fool - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-10-2007, 11:00 PM
101st day of 2007 - 264 remaining.

Wednesday, April 11, 2007
BARBERSHOP QUARTET DAY.

The SPEBSQSA (Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America) was founded on this day in 1938 by 26 singing, striped-shirted gentlemen. Now we know that’s 6½ quartets worth, but that’s what it took to get the organization humming. So, let’s head for the barbershop and ask for a “shave & a haircut, two bits!” or a refrain of Sweet Adeline.

By the way, Sweet Adeline, the love song that became a favorite of barbershop quartets, was written in 1903 by Richard Gerard and Henry Armstrong; and there really was a sweet Adeline. She was opera singer Adelina Patti.

Today, female barbershop quartets are called Sweet Adelines.

All together now, let’s harmonize. Hummmm.

Events
April 11th.

1803 - A twin-screw propeller steamboat was patented by John Stevens. The boat was 25 feet long and four feet wide.

1876 - The stenotype was patented by John C. Zachos of New York City. And then, he invented the stenographer...

1921 - The first live sports event on radio took place this day over KDKA radio. Pittsburgh sports writer, Florent Gibson, gave an account of the action in the lightweight boxing match between Johnny Ray and Johnny Dundee.

1940 - Andrew Ponzi of New York set a world’s record in a New York pocket billiards tournament. Ponzi ran 127 balls straight. Eight-ball in the side pocket, pal...

1943 - Nick Carter, Master Detective debuted on Mutual radio. The show was based on a New York Weekly character who was first introduced in 1886.

1947 - Jackie Robinson became the first black player in major-league history when he played in an exhibition game for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1956 - Elvis Presley reached the top spot on the Billboard music chart with his first double-sided hit. The disk featured Heartbreak Hotel and I Was the One. The RCA Victor record stayed at number one for eight weeks. Elvis also made the country and R&B charts, as well.

1961 - Carl Yastrzemski replaced Ted Williams in left field for the Boston Red Sox. The ‘Yaz’ was just 21 years old and had but two years experience in the minor leagues when he was called. In his first at-bat, he got a hit off Kansas City’s Ray Herbert. Yastrzemski retired in 1984, having played his entire major-league career in a Boston Red Sox uniform.

1961 - Bob Dylan made his professional singing debut in Greenwich Village. He sang Blowin’ in the Wind.

1962 - The New York Mets played their first regular season game. The team, managed by Casey Stengel, lost its first ten games. The St. Louis Cardinals won by a score of 11-4 -- prompting Stengel to say, before a group of reporters and players, “Can anyone here play this game?”

1965 - For the second time, Jack Nicklaus won the Masters golf title. He shot a par 271. Runners-up in a tie for second place were Arnold Palmer and Gary Player. It was the first time the ‘Big Three’ finished 1, 2, 3 in a tournament.

1981 - Wedding bells chimed for guitarist, Eddie Van Halen and actress, Valerie Bertinelli of One Day at a Time (CBS-TV). The lovely couple was married in Los Angeles, California. Van Halen, who is so cool that his group is named after him, was born in Nijmegen, The Netherlands and moved to Pasadena, CA in 1968. David Lee Roth was a member of the group, as was rocker, Sammy Hagar, who replaced Roth in 1985. The group was founded in 1974. On the Van Halen hit list, these toe tappers: Jump, Dance the Night Away, (Oh) Pretty Woman, Why Can’t This Be Love, Dreams and When It’s Love.

1983 - There were so many outstanding films in 1982, that the members of the Academy must have had a real struggle making up their minds in time for this night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Somehow, decisions were made and the 55th Annual Academy Awards ceremonies proceeded with hosts Liza Minnelli, Dudley Moore, Richard Pryor, and Walter Matthau. Those who voted for Best Picture had to choose between E.T.: the Extra-Terrestrial, Missing, Tootsie, The Verdict and Gandhi. Gandhi (Richard Attenborough, producer) was the winner of this Oscar and seven more including Best Director Richard Attenborough; Best Actor Ben Kingsley; Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Stuart Craig, Robert W. Laing, Michael Seirton); Best Cinematography (Ronnie Taylor, Billy Williams); Best Costume Design (Bhanu Athaiya, John Mollo); Best Film Editing (John Bloom); Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (John Briley). Believe it or not there were some Oscars leftover for other deserving folks. The Best Actress golden statuette was awarded to Meryl Streep for Sophie’s Choice; while Jessica Lange received her Best Supporting Actress award for Tootsie and Louis Gossett, Jr. picked up his Best Supporting Actor award for An Officer and a Gentleman. An Officer and a Gentleman was honored again for Best Music/Song: Up Where We Belong (Jack Nitzsche and Buffy Sainte-Marie [music], Will Jennings [lyrics], with Victor/Victoria winning the category of Best Music/Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score (Henry Mancini, Leslie Bricusse). Poltergeist, Annie, Rocky III, Blade Runner, Das Boot, Diner, The World According to Garp were also among the nominees at this Oscar celebration. We told you the voters must have had a difficult time voting!!!

1984 - The Detroit Pistons beat the Philadelphia 76ers 126-113 in a National Basketball Association game. It marked the first time the Pistons were able to defeat the 76ers at the Spectrum in Philly since November 2, 1974, a span of 22 games.

1986 - Kellogg’s of Battle Creek, MI stopped its 80-year tradition of tours of the breakfast-food plant on this day, saying that company secrets were at risk with spies from other cereal manufacturers.

1988 - Cher was sure moonstruck at this the 60th Annual Academy Awards at LA’s Shrine Auditorium. And as well she should have been. After all, she won the Oscar for Best Actress (Moonstruck), over the likes of Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, Sally Kirkland, and Holly Hunter. Moonstruck struck gold again as Olympia Dukakis picked up the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress, and John Patrick Shanley won for Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen. Almost all of the other awards (9) that evening were won by The Last Emperor (Jeremy Thomas, producer) including Best Picture, and Best Director (Bernardo Bertolucci), except for Michael Douglas who received the Best Actor award for his performance in Wall Street, Sean Connery for his Best Supporting Actor role in The Untouchables, and Dirty Dancing which had the winning Music/Song, (I’ve Had) The Time of My Life (music: Frank Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz, lyrics: Frank Previte). Funny man Chevy Chase hosted the fun-filled event. Note: The Last Emperor won in every category in which it was nominated.

Birthdays
April 11th.

1864 - Lillie P. Bliss
founder [with 2 other women] of New York City’s Museum of Modern Art; died in 1931

1893 - Lou Holtz
comedian, actor: Follow the Leader [1930], School for Romance [1934], When Do We Eat? [1934]; died Sep 22, 1980

1899 - Percy Julian
scientist: developer of synthetic progesterone, inexpensive production method to produce cortisone, a drug to treat glaucoma, chemical foam to smother oil fires; died Apr 19, 1975

1907 - Paul Douglas
actor: The Mating Game, Panic in the Streets, Executive Suite, This Could be the Night, The Gamma People; died Sep 11, 1959

1908 - Jane Bolin
attorney: first black woman graduate of Yale School of Law; first black, female judge

1912 - John Levy
jazz musician: bass: played with George Shearing quintet

1913 - Oleg Cassini
fashion designer

1921 - Dorothy Shay (Sims)
‘The Park Avenue Hillbilly’: singer: Feudin’ and Fightin’; actress: Comin’ Round the Mountain; died Oct 22, 1978

1922 - Ralph Blaze
guitarist: played with Stan Kenton

1928 - Ethel Kennedy (Skakel)
widow of slain U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy

1931 - Johnny Sheffield
actor: Tarzan Finds a Son, Tarzan’s Secret Treasure, Tarzan’s New York Adventure

1932 - Joel Grey (Katz)
Tony & Academy award-winning actor: Cabaret [1967 & 1972]; singer, dancer: Yankee Doodle Dandy, Buffalo Bill & the Indians, Kafka; actress Jennifer Grey’s father

1939 - Louise Lasser
actress: Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex [But Were Afraid to Ask], Frankenhooker, Rude Awakening, The Night We Never Met, Slither

1944 - Joe Beauchamp
football: Univ. of Iowa, SD Chargers

1947 - Peter Riegert
actor: The Mask, Oscar, Crossing Delancey, Local Hero, National Lampoon’s Animal House, Middle Ages

1950 - Bill Irwin
actor: Stepping Out, Scenes from a Mall, Hot Shots!, My Blue Heaven, Eight Men Out, Popeye; choreographer: The Regard of Flight

1951 - Steve George
football: Univ. of Houston, St. Louis Cardinals

1951 - Sid Monge
baseball: pitcher: California Angels, Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1979], Philadelphia Phillies, SD Padres, Detroit Tigers

1956 - Neville Staple
singer: group: The Specials: Gangsters, A Message to You Rudy, Too Much Too Young, Ghost Town

1958 - Stuart (William) Adamson
musician: guitar, singer: group: Big Country: Harvest Home, Fields of Fire, In a Big Country, Chance, Wonderland, East of Eden, Where the Rose is Sown; died Dec 16, 2001

1966 - Lisa Stansfield
singer, songwriter: All Around the World, You Can’t Deny It, This is the Right Time

1970 - Delroy Pearson
singer: group: Five Star: System Addict, Find the Time, Rain or Shine.

Chart Toppers
April 11th.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Blue Barron Orchestra (vocal: ensemble)
Sunflower - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The Skylarks)
Red Roses for a Blue Lady - Vaughn Monroe
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
Party Doll - Buddy Knox
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 I’m Telling You Now - Freddie & The Dreamers
The Birds and the Bees - Jewel Akens
Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders
King of the Road - Roger Miller

1973 The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia - Vicki Lawrence
Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye) - Gladys
Knight & The Pips
Ain’t No Woman (Like the One I’ve Got) - Four Tops
Super Kind of Woman - Freddie Hart & The Heartbeats

1981 Kiss on My List - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
You’re the Reason God Made Oklahoma - David Frizzell & Shelly West

1989 The Look - Roxette
She Drives Me Crazy - Fine Young cannibals
Like a Prayer - Madonna
I’m No Stranger to the Rain - Keith Whitley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-11-2007, 11:00 PM
102nd day of 2007 - 263 remaining.

Thursday, April 12, 2007
ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK DAY (AND NIGHT) ;)

Bill Haley and His Comets recorded Rock Around the Clock for Decca Records on this day in 1954. The song was recorded at the Pythian Temple, “a big, barnlike building with great echo,” in New York City. Rock Around the Clock was formally released a month later.

Most rock historians feel the tune, featured in the 1955 film Blackboard Jungle, ushered in the era of rock ’n’ roll. It hit number one on June 29, 1955 and stayed there for eight weeks, remaining on the charts for a total of 24 weeks.

Rock Around the Clock was not Haley’s first recording, however. He had waxed three other songs, all for Decca: Shake, Rattle and Roll, Dim, Dim the Lights, and Mambo Rock. And, through 1974, Haley and his group charted 14 hits, including, See You Later, Alligator from 1956. Rock Around the Clock was re-released in 1974. On its second run it made it to number 30 on the pop charts.

Haley died of a heart attack in Harlingen, TX on February 9, 1981. He was posthumously awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1982 for Rock Around the Clock. The record has now sold over 25,000,000 copies.

Events
April 12th.

1799 - Phineas Pratt patented the comb cutting machine -- a “machine for making combs.”

1833 - Charles Gaylor patented the fireproof safe in New York City. The safes are widely used to protect everything from priceless art to sensitive computer software. Some safes can burn at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour and the contents will still be as cool as a cucumber. Other units can sustain heat up to 400-500 degrees for about the same time without damaging the valuable contents within.

1847 - Yung Wing, one of several Chinese students to arrive in America this day, went on to become the first student from China to graduate from Yale University [1854].

1877 - James Alexander Tyng, while playing a baseball game in Lynn, MA, became the first ballplayer to wear a catcher’s mask.

1892 - Voters in Lockport, NY became the first in the U.S. to use voting machines.

1905 - The Hippodrome opened in New York City with the gala musical revue, A Yankee Circus on Mars. Realize please, that this extraordinary event was done without the help of even one hippo...

1932 - The thrill-comedy, Joe Palooka, which would also be a popular comic strip, made its debut on CBS radio.

1939 - One of the classic theme songs of the Big Band era was recorded for Decca. Woody Herman’s orchestra recorded Woodchopper’s Ball.

1955 - The polio vaccine of Dr. Jonas Salk was termed “safe, effective and potent” by the University of Michigan Polio Vaccine Evaluation Center.

1963 - Bob Dylan appeared in his first solo concert at Town Hall in New York City.

1964 - Arnold Palmer won his fourth Masters title and became the first golfer to make career earnings of $506,496.84. We haven’t a clue where the 84 cents came from.

1964 - Philadelphia singer Chubby Checker married former Miss World, the Dutch-born beauty Catharina Lodders.

1967 - Jim Brown made his TV acting debut in Cops and Robbers on the NBC show I Spy, starring Bill Cosby and Robert Culp. I Spy aired from 1965 through 1968. The primary characters, Cosby and Culp, were secret agents posing as a top-notch tennis star and his trainer-companion. I Spy was the first television series to co-star a black actor.

1969 - Lucy and Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts made the cover of Saturday Review.

1984 - Challenger astronauts made the first satellite repair in orbit by returning a healthy Solar Max satellite to space. The orbiting sun watcher had been circling the Earth for three years with all circuits dead before repairs were made.

1985 - Federal inspectors declared that four animals of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus were not unicorns, as the circus said, but goats with horns which had been surgically implanted. The circus was ordered to quit advertising the fake unicorns as anything else but goats. We assure you that no animals are harmed in the production of Those Were the Days and we use only first-rate, genuine unicorns.

1985 - Senator Joseph ‘Jake’ Garn became the first space politician as he lifted off this day from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

1987 - Larry Mize, 28, hit a miracle shot -- a 140-foot chip -- to win the Masters golf title in Augusta, GA. Mize defeated Greg Norman and Severiano Ballesteros in a playoff.

Birthdays
April 12th.

1777 - Henry Clay
‘The Great Pacificator’: U.S. Secretary of State under John Quincy Adams; three time unsuccessful candidate for president of U.S.: “I would rather be right than president.”; died June 29, 1852

1904 - Lily (Alice) Pons
soprano singer, actress: I Dream Too Much, That Girl from Paris; died Feb 13, 1976

1916 - Russ Garcia
musician, composer, orchestra leader: Waiter, Make Mine Blues [w/Anita O’Day]; Royal Wedding Suite [w/Oscar Peterson]

1923 - Ann Miller (Lucille Ann Collier)
actress, dancer: Easter Parade, Sugar Babies, You Can’t Take It with You, Hit the Deck, Kiss Me Kate, On the Town, Room Service, Lovely to Look At; died Jan 22, 2004

1926 - Jane Withers
actress: Captain Newman, M.D., Giant, The Farmer Takes a Wife, Bright Eyes, TV commercials: Josephine the plumber

1931 - Billy (Richard) Vaughn
musician, orchestra leader: Melody of Love, The Shifting, Whispering Sands, Sail along Silver Moon; baritone singer with The Hilltoppers; music director: Dot Records; died Sep 26, 1991

1932 - Tiny Tim (aka Darry Dover, Larry Love) (Herbert Khaury)
ukulele playing, falsetto singer: Tiptoe Through the Tulips, Sonny Boy; film: You Are What You Eat, TV: Laugh In; died Nov 30, 1996

1933 - Charlie (Charles Richard) Lau
baseball: Detroit Tigers, Milwaukee Braves, Baltimore Orioles, KC Athletics, Atlanta Braves; died Mar 18, 1984

1938 - Judy Lynn
country singer: Footsteps of a Fool; entertainer: Las Vegas; The Judy Lynn Show; Snake Valley Jamboree Queen [1952]; U.S. Champion Yodeler [1953]; Miss Idaho [1955]

1940 - Woody (Woodrow Thompson) Fryman
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1968], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos [all-star: 1976], Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs

1940 - Herbie Han****
Oscar-winning jazz/fusion musician, composer of original score: Round Midnight [1986]; TV score: Rockschool; singles: Riot, Cantaloupe Island, Rockit, Dolphin’s Dance

1944 - Terry (Walter) Harmon
baseball: Philadelphia Phillies

1944 - John Kay (Joachim Krauledat)
guitarist, vocalist: group: Steppenwolf: Born To Be Wild, Magic Carpet Ride, Rock Me

1946 - Ed O’Neill
actor: Married......with Children, Little Giants, Wayne’s World, Deliverance, Dragnet [2003]

1947 - Dan Lauria
actor: The Wonder Years, Amazing Grace, In the Line of Duty: Ambush in Waco, Stakeout

1947 - David Letterman
TV host & comedian: Late Night with David Letterman

1949 - Scott Turow
author: Presumed Innocent, The Burden of Proof

1950 - ‘Chip’ James Earl Carter III
son of 39th U.S. President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Roslyn Carter

1950 - David Cassidy
actor: The Partridge Family, Spirit of ’76, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; singer: Cherish, I Think I Love You; son of actors: Jack Cassidy, Evelyn Ward

1951 - Alex Briley
singer: group: The Village People: YMCA

1952 - Reuben Gant
football: Oklahoma State Univ., Buffalo Bills

1956 - Andy Garcia
actor: When a Man Loves a Woman, A Show of Force, The Godfather: Part 3, The Untouchables, Blue Skies Again

1957 - Vince Gill
Grammy Award-winning singer: When Love Finds You [1994], I Still Believe in You [1992], When I Call Your Name [1990], Restless [w/Steve Wariner and Ricky Skaggs] [1991]; Grammy Award-winning musician: guitar: Red Wing [w/Asleep at the Wheel] [1993]; songwriter: If It Weren’t for Him [w/Roseanne Cash]; groups: Bluegrass Alliance, Sundance, The Cherry Bombs, Pure Prairie League

1958 - Will Sergeant
musician: guitar: groups: Echo & the Bunnymen: Pictures on My Wall, Rescue; Electrafixion: LPs: Zephyr, Burned

1971 - Shannen Doherty
actress: Beverly Hills 90210, Our House, Little House on the Prairie, Night Shift, Heathers

1979 - Claire Danes
actress: How to Make an American Quilt, Home for the Holidays, Little Women, My So Called Life, Law & Order, The Mod Squad [1999]

Chart Toppers
April 12th.

1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
Peter Cottontail - Gene Autry
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 Tequila - The Champs
He’s Got the Whole World (In His Hands) - Laurie London
Book of Love - The Monotones
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Daydream - The Lovin’ Spoonful
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 Sunshine on My Shoulders - John Denver
Hooked on a Feeling - Blue Swede
Bennie & The Jets - Elton John
A Very Special Love Song - Charlie Rich

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Make a Move on Me - Olivia Newton-John
Big City - Merle Haggard

1990 Love Will Lead You Back - Taylor Dayne
I’ll Be Your Everything - Tommy Page
All Around the World - Lisa Stansfield
Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-12-2007, 11:00 PM
103rd day of 2007 - 262 remaining.

Friday, April 13, 2007
SCRABBLE DAY. :)

For all of you who can spend hour, upon hour, trying to use up all of your letters for the fifty-point bonus while on a triple word score, this day is yours to celebrate. You’ll be celebrating Alfred Butts’ birthday. Alfred was born on this day in 1899. He grew up to become an architect, but lost his job during the Depression. While he wiled away the hours of unemployment, he invented a crossword puzzle word-game. He and his friends had a good time playing the game, but that’s as far as it went ... until one fateful day in 1952. Butts and friends were at a resort (he survived the Depression) and, as fate would have it, a Macy’s department store executive saw them playing their game. The executive took the game back to Macy’s where it became a successful sales item.

It wasn’t long before the game makers of Selchow & Richter caught wind of the habit-forming board game. They offered Butts three cents for every set they manufactured. Butts accepted and Scrabble went on the assembly line. Thirty-five laborers made Scrabble sets by the thousands ... six-thousand sets were coming off the line every week. Scrabble is still one of the best-selling game boards made. Now you can even play it on your computer.

Of his three-cents worth, Butts said, “One third went to taxes. I gave one third away, and the other third enabled me to have an enjoyable life.”

Thanks to Alfred Butts, we have had many, many hours of enjoyment. However, we still wish there were more ‘U’ tiles to go with those dastardly ‘Qs’.

Events
April 13th.


1782 - Washington, North Carolina was incorporated as the first town to be named for -- take a guess -- George Washington. One of these days we’re going to add up all the places, towns and points of interest that are named after the first president of the U.S. Maybe we could have a contest -- the first person with the correct answer wins a set of wooden teeth...

1796 - The first known elephant (like, how would one NOT know it was an elephant?) to arrive in the United States, came to America. The elephant was from Bengal, India and entered the U.S.A. through New York City.

1916 - The first hybrid, seed corn was purchased -- for 15-cents a bushel -- by Samuel Ramsay of Jacobsburg, OH.

1940 - A record pole vault of 15 feet was made in Berkeley, CA by Cornelius Warmerdam. Sergei Bubka from the Ukraine doesn’t think much of this record. In 1994, he vaulted himself up and over at a height of 20 feet, 1¾ inches.

1940 - The first of the ‘Road’ movies with Bob Hope, Big Crosby and Dorothy Lamour opened at the Paramount Theatre in New York City. The film was The Road to Singapore.

1943 - The Thomas Jefferson Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. on this, the anniversary of Jefferson’s birth.

1954 - Hank Aaron debuted for the Milwaukee Braves. In his first ever major-league baseball game, Hammerin’ Hank went 0-for-5 against Cincinnati. Aaron’s first major-league homer came 10 days later.

1958 - Van Cliburn of Kilgore, TX earned 1st prize in the Soviet Union’s Tchaikovsky International Piano Contest in Moscow.

1961 - Carnival opened on Broadway at the Imperial Theatre in New York City. Anna Maria Alberghetti starred in the musical which ran for 719 performances.

1963 - Pete Rose got his first major-league hit for the Cincinnati Reds. Twenty one years later to this day, ‘Charlie Hustle’ collected his 4,000th hit. Rose was playing for Montreal when he achieved the feat. (See 1984.)

1964 - The 36th Annual Academy Awards ceremony proved to be a long evening for host Jack Lemmon and his audience at Los Angeles’ Santa Monica Civic Auditorium and those viewing on TV. We don’t know exactly how long the actual ceremonies were, but judging from the length of the films being honored, ‘long’ was the magic word. The five films nominated for Best Picture of 1963 averaged 159 minutes, including the two epics, Cleopatra (243 minutes) and How the West Was Won (165 minutes). Tom Jones (Tony Richardson, producer), which won the top prize, plus Best Director (Tony Richardson) Best Music/Score/Substantially Original (John Addison) and Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (John Osborne)was a mere two hours long. There were, however, a few average-length flicks that featured above-average, Oscar-winning performances: Best Actor: Sidney Poitier (Lilies of the Field); Best Actress: Patricia Neal and Best Supporting Actor: Melvyn Douglas (Hud); Best Supporting Actress: Margaret Rutherford (The V.I.P.s); and Best Music/Song: Call Me Irresponsible, James Van Heusen (music), Sammy Cahn (lyrics) from Papa’s Delicate Condition. Other marathon Oscar-winning movies of 1963: It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (188 minutes); America, America (174 minutes); Irma la Douce (147 minutes).

1972 - The first strike in the history of major-league baseball ended. Players had walked off the field 13 days earlier.

1980 - Broadway’s longest-running musical closed after eight years. Grease ran for 3,388 performances and earned $8 million. Though the-longest running musical on the Great White Way at the time, Grease was also the third longest-running Broadway show. Other shows in the top five included: The Defiant Ones and Life with Father, Oh! Calcutta, A Chorus Line and Fiddler on the Roof.

1981 - Janet Cook won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Things took a strange turn when she later said that her prize-winning story in The Washington Post was a fake. She made up the story and passed it off as truth. Her award was taken away and given instead to Teresa Carpenter of New York’s Village Voice.

1984 - The Montreal Expos welcomed Pete Rose to the team and he repaid the Expos’ faithful with a double against his former teammates, the Philadelphia Phillies. It was Rose’s 4,000th career hit. He is the only National League player to reach this milestone since Ty Cobb got 4,109 total hits with American League teams, Detroit and Philadelphia.

1985 - The Grand Ole Opry, a radio staple from Nashville for 60 years, came to TV. The Nashville Network presented the country music jamboree to some 22-million homes across the U.S.

1986 - Jack Nicklaus won his sixth Masters green jacket with a 9-under-par 279.

Birthdays
April 13th.


1743 - Thomas Jefferson
3rd U.S. President [1801-1809]; married to Martha Skelton [one son, five daughters]; nickname: Man of the People; died July 4, 1826

1852 - F. W. (Frank Winfield) Woolworth
merchant: created the five and ten cent store [1879 in Lancaster, PA]: headed F.W. Woolworth & Co. with over 1,000 stores, funded NY’s Woolworth Building; died Apr 8, 1919

1899 - Alfred M. Butts
architect, game inventor; died Apr 4, 1993; see Scrabble Day [above]

1906 - Samuel Beckett
author, critic, playwright: Waiting for Godot, The Unnameable, Eleutheria, Malone Dies, Malloy, Endgame; died Dec 22, 1989

1906 - Bud (Lawrence) Freeman
jazz musician: tenor sax: China Boy, Easy to Get, I’ve Found a New Baby, The Eel, Mr. Toad; died Mar 15, 1991

1907 - Harold Stassen
perennial U.S. Presidential candidate; governor of Minnesota; a member of President Eisenhower’s cabinet; one of the founders of the U.N.; died Mar 4, 2001

1909 - Eudora Welty
poet: Delta Wedding, Losing Battles, A Curtain of Green; quote: “The events in our lives happen in a sequence in time, but in their significance to ourselves they find their own order.”; Computer programmer Steve Dorner (Univ of Illinois,Urbana) created a freeware e-mail program in the late 1980s and dubbed it “Eudora”, which is one of the most popular e-mail readers used around the world, because of Welty’s short story "Why I Live at the P.O." (published in 1941); died July 23, 2001

1919 - Howard Keel (Harry Clifford Leek)
actor: Dallas; singer, actor: Oklahoma, Annie Get Your Gun, Show Boat, Lovely to Look At, Kiss Me Kate, Calamity Jane, Rose-Marie, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Deep in My Heart, Saratoga, No Strings; died Nov 7, 2004

1919 - Madalyn Murray O’Hair
author: Why I Am an Atheist; murdered: missing since Aug 1995, her body was found near Camp Wood TX Jan 28, 2001

1923 - Don Adams (Donald James Yarmy)
Emmy Award-winning actor: Get Smart [1966-1967, 1967-1968]; Back to the Beach, The Nude Bomb; died Sep 25, 2005

1925 - Jules Irving
actor: It Came from Beneath the Sea [aka Monster from Beneath the Sea]; died July 28, 1979

1928 - Teddy Charles (Theodore Charles Cohen)
vibraphonist, songwriter: Blue Greens; group: Teddy Charles Quintet; composer, arranger; worked w/modern jazz artists like Herbie Han****, John Coltrane

1929 - Marilynn Smith
golf: Univ. of Kansas: Kansas State Amateur champ [1946-1948], national collegiate title [1949]; 22 tournament victories/2 major championships [Titleholders: 1963, 1964]; LPGA founder/charter member, president [1958-1960]

1931 - Dan Gurney
auto racer: Indianapolis Speedway Hall of Famer; 1st driver to win all 4 major categories: Formula One, Indy Cars, NASCAR stock and sports cars; team owner: builds All-American Eagle

1935 - Lyle Waggoner
actor: The Carol Burnett Show, The Jimmie Rodgers Show, Wonder Woman, Dead Women in Lingerie

1937 - Edward Fox
actor: Gulliver’s Travels, The Dresser, Gandhi, The Mirror Crack’d, Force 10 from Navarone, The Big Sleep, A Bridge Too Far, The Day of the Jackal, Portrait of a Lady

1939 - Paul Sorvino
actor: Law and Order, Reds, Oh! God, The Day of the Dolphin, Dick Tracy, Goodfellas, A Touch of Class

1940 - Jose Napoles
Internatinal Boxing Hall of Famer: welterweight champ [1969, 1970]

1940 - Lester Chambers
singer, musician: harmonica: group: The Chambers Brothers: Time Has Come Today

1942 - Bill Conti
Academy Award-winning composer of scores: The Right Stuff [1983]; Dynasty, Falcon Crest, Inside Edition

1944 - Jack Casady
musician: bass: groups: KBC Band, Hot Tuna; Jefferson Airplane: It’s No Secret, Runnin’ Round this World, Somebody to Love, White Rabbit

1944 - Brian Pendleton
musician: guitar: group: The Pretty Things; died May 25, 2001

1945 - Tony Dow
actor: Leave It to Beaver, Back to the Beach, High School U.S.A., Death Scream

1946 - Al Green
singer, songwriter: Tired of Being Alone, Let’s Stay Together, You Ought to be with Me, Here I Am, Call Me

1950 - Ron Perlman
actor: Fluke, Double Exposure, Beauty and the Beast series, The Name of the Rose

1951 - Max Weinberg
musician: drummer: E Street Band; bandleader: The Max Weinberg 7 [Late Night with Conan O’Brien]

1951 - Peabo Bryson
singer: Underground Music, I Can Make It Better, Just Another Day, Do It with Feeling, Tonight I Celebrate My Love, If You’re Ever in My arms Again

1954 - Jimmy Destri
musician: Farfisa organ; group: Blondie: Picture This, Hanging on the Telephone, Sunday Girl, Heart of Glass, Call Me, The Tide is High, Rapture

1957 - Saundra Santiago
actress: Miami Vice, Beat Street

1963 - Garry Kasparov
World Chess Champion: international grand master

1970 - Rick Schroder
actor: NYPD Blue, Crimson Tide, Texas, Lonesome Dove, Hansel and Gretel, Earthling, The Champ, Silver Spoons.

Chart Toppers
April 13th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
Be My Love - Mario Lanza
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
Pink Shoe Laces - Dodie Stevens
(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I - Elvis Presley
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Happy Together - The Turtles
Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
Bernadette - Four Tops
Walk Through This World with Me - George Jones

1975 Philadelphia Freedom - The Elton John Band
Poetry Man - Phoebe Snow
(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song
- B.J. Thomas
Always Wanting You - Merle Haggard

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me - Culture Club
Hungry like the Wolf - Duran Duran
We’ve Got Tonight - Kenny Rogers & Sheena Easton

1991 I’ve Been Thinking About You - Londonbeat
You’re in Love - Wilson Phillips
Hold You Tight - Tara Kemp
Down Home - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-13-2007, 11:00 PM
104th day of 2007 - 261 remaining.

Page, 1 of 2.
Saturday, April 14, 2007
FIRST LADY OF THE AMERICAN SCREEN DAY.

What a night this was back in 1969! All the egos and glamour of Hollywood were gathered together in one place for the annual Academy Awards presentation. All in the theatre and those watching the extravaganza on television could feel the electricity in the air as the envelope, announcing the Best Actress Award, was opened.

It was the 11th nomination for Katharine Hepburn, an academy record! And, the Oscar goes to ...

For the first time in the history of the Academy Awards, a tie resulted in two stars sharing the Best Actress Oscar. Barbra Streisand for her performance in Funny Girl had reached the top, only to share the honor with the ‘First Lady of the American Screen’, Katharine Hepburn for her starring role in The Lion in Winter.

Hepburn also broke the record that night as the only actress to win three Best Actress Oscars. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner awarded the previous year and Morning Glory [1932-33] were the other films. She was also only the third person to win two years in a row. Hepburn added a twelfth nomination and a fourth Oscar in 1981 for her performance in On Golden Pond with co-star Henry Fonda. She earned three of these awards after her sixtieth birthday.

There’s an old saying that goes something like this, “He who laughs last, laughs best.” Not all of Katharine Hepburn’s peers were admirers. After completing her first film (A Bill of Divorcement) in 1932, she told her lecherous, co-star John Barrymore that she would never act with him again. His reply, “Really, my dear? I didn’t know you ever had.” Hepburn, who had made her stage debut on Broadway in 1928, was reviewed by columnist Dorothy Parker for a 1933 performance as “running the gamut of emotions from A to B.” And, in 1938 she was labeled “box-office poison.” Obviously Hepburn has had the last laugh.

Her most memorable performances include Bringing Up Baby and The Philadelphia Story opposite Cary Grant; Woman of the Year, Adam’s Rib, Pat and Mike with co-star and significant other, Spencer Tracy; The African Queen with Humphrey Bogart and Suddenly Last Summer opposite Montgomery Clift. Long Day’s Journey into Night earned her a 1962 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress award.

From Broadway to Hollywood to television ... 1975 Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in her ABC Theatre performance, opposite Laurence Olivier, in Love Among the Ruins ... to literature ... two best-sellers, The Making of "The African Queen" or How I Went to Africa with Bogart, Bacall and Huston and Almost Lost My Mind and her autobiography, Me, Katharine Hepburn remains a star, the idol of independent, talented young women in their search for fame and fortune.

Events
April 14th.

1865 - John Wilkes Booth, a well-known actor, was permitted upstairs at Ford’s Theatre. Thus, he gained access to U.S. President Abraham Lincoln’s private theatre box as Lincoln watched the performance of Our American Cousin. It was just after 10 p.m. when Booth, a Confederate sympathizer, shot Lincoln in the head. After shooting the President, Booth leaped to the stage below, shouting, “Sic semper tyrannis!” (“Thus always to tyrants!”, the state motto of Virginia.) He broke his leg in the fall but managed to escape the theatre (which was in Washington, D.C.), mount a horse, and flee to Virginia. Booth was hunted down and shot as he hid in a barn near Port Royal, Virginia. Lincoln died at 7:22 a.m. the next day.

1894 - The kinetoscope was demonstrated by its inventor, Thomas Alva Edison, in New York City. A viewer that held 50 feet of film -- about 13 seconds worth -- showed images of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill. The demonstration was actually called the first peep show, as one had to peep into the device to see what was on the film. Movies were not projected on a screen at that time.

1902 - J.C. (James Cash) Penney opened his first store -- in Kemmerer Wyoming. In partnership with Thomas M. Callahan and William Guy Johnson, Penney named the store Golden Rule. The dry goods and clothing store had a first-year profit of $8,514.36 on sales of $28,898.11.

1910 - The Philadelphia Athletics, under manager Connie Mack, played the Washington Senators in what became a most historic game. This game was not only the season opener; but also, the first time a United States President had thrown out the first ball. The president was William Howard Taft. The game was held in Washington, DC and appropriately, The Senators won 3-0. And so began a baseball tradition. Play ball!

1912 - “Up in the crows nest, Frederick Fleet was staring into the darkness. It was around 11:30 p.m. on a very odd calm moonless night when he noticed a black object immediately in their path, he knew it was ice!” The Royal Mail Steamship Titanic of the White Star Line struck an iceberg at approximately 11:40 p.m. The great ship, on its maiden voyage, sank just under three hours later. 1,517 passengers were lost at sea. (See TWtD, April 15.)

1912 - Frederick Rodman Law was a stunt man and became the first man to intentionally jump from the Brooklyn Bridge in New York without intending to take his own life. He was OK after the leap.

1935 - Babe Ruth played his first game for the National League in Fenway Park in Boston, MA. This time, he was playing for the Boston Braves, not his old Red Sox. Ruth was in his last year of pro ball in the major leagues. In this, his last season, Ruth played only 28 games, getting 13 hits and six home runs, before hanging up his spikes for good.

1941 - Hildegarde recorded the standard Darling Je Vous Aime Beaucoup on Decca Records. Hildegarde was the elegant singer with the long white gloves who was accompanied by the Harry Sosnik Orchestra. It took another 14 years, but Nat ‘King’ Cole turned the song into an even bigger hit, landing at number 7 on the pop music charts.

1956 - Ampex Corporation of Redwood City, CA demonstrated the first commercial magnetic tape recorder for sound and picture. The videotape machine had a price tag of $75,000. These early Ampex units were too large to fit in a small room. That’s back when bigger was better.

1958 - Pianist Van Cliburn was presented on national TV for the first time on NBC’s The Tonight Show with Jack Paar.

1958 - Laurie London reached the top spot on the music charts with He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands, knocking Perry Como’s Catch a Falling Star down a peg or two.

1960 - The musical Bye Bye Birdie opened at the Martin Beck Theatre in New York City. Chita Rivera and Dick Van Dyke starred in the Broadway show which ran for 607 performances.

1967 - Herman’s Hermits, featuring lead singer Peter Noone, went gold with the single, There’s a Kind of Hush. It was a two-sided hit, with the flip-side, No Milk Today, also receiving considerable play. Hush, however, was a top five song, while the ‘B’ side just made it into the top 40 at number 35.

1968 - Bob Goalby won the Masters Golf Tournament after Roberto DeVicenzo signed an incorrect scorecard. DeVicenzo signed for a score higher than his actual score on the 17th hole (a par 4 when he actually made a birdie 3). The rules say that you have to stick to the higher score, once you sign for it. The lower score would have pitted DeVicenzo against Goalby in a playoff match and who knows what might have happened? Ouch! On top of this, it was DeVicenzo’s 45th birthday, as well!

1969 - This was a night of firsts at the 41st Annual Academy Awards ceremony. For the first time, the happenings at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles were beamed to TV audiences worldwide. Appropriately, a foreign (British) film was honored as Best Picture: Oliver! (John Woolf, producer), which also won for Best Director (Carol Reed); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (John Box, Terence Marsh, Vernon Dixon, Ken Muggleston); Best Sound (Shepperton SSD); Best Music/Score of a Musical Picture/Original or Adaptation (Johnny Green). And, for the first time, there was a tie for Best Actress. Barbra Streisand picked up her statuette for her starring role in Funny Girl, and for the second year in a row, Katharine Hepburn was honored as Best Actress, this time for her performance in The Lion in Winter. Other veteran actors received their first Oscars this night: Cliff Robertson for his Best Actor role in Charly; Jack Albertson for his Best Supporting Actor role in The Subject Was Roses and Ruth Gordon for her Best Supporting Actress role in Rosemary’s Baby. Even the Best Music/Song award was presented for the first time to Michel Legrand (music) and Alan and Marilyn Bergman (lyrics) for the song The Windmills of Your Mind from the The Thomas Crown Affair. Other great 1968 films that were Oscar-winners or nominees: 2001: A Space Odyssey; Chitty Chitty Bang Bang; For Love of Ivy; Planet of the Apes; Bullitt; The Odd Couple; Romeo and Juliet; The Producers; Rachel, Rachel.

1980 - Stan Mikita retired after 21 years with the Chicago Black Hawks of the NHL. His #21 jersey became the first Blackhawks number to be retired.

1980 - Kramer vs. Norma, Apocalypse vs. Jazz. That’s how the honors were divided at the 52nd Annual Academy Awards ceremony at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Johnny Carson was hosting quite a contest! But the Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role went to Melvyn Douglas for his performance in Being There. Was it going to be an upset? Being There was a long shot to win Best Picture and this was its first award all evening. All That Jazz had already won four of the golden statuettes and Apocalypse Now, two. Next, it was Meryl Streep who picked up the Best Supporting Actress Oscar and Dustin Hoffman, Best Actor, for their roles in Kramer vs. Kramer, making it a trio of Oscars for Kramer, so far. Then Norma Rae picked up two awards: Best Music/Song, It Goes like It Goes, David Shire (music), Norman Gimbel (lyrics) and Best Actress, Sally Field. But it was in the cards for Kramer vs. Kramer as it won for Best Director (Robert Benton), and then, Best Picture (Stanley R. Jaffe, producer). Going into the evening, All That Jazz and Kramer vs. Kramer each had nine Oscar nominations, Apocalypse Now had eight, and Norma Rae, four.

1985 - Bernhard Langer shot a 282 and won the Masters golf tournament. It was the West German’s first official year as a member of the PGA Tour.

Birthdays
April 14th.

1866 - Anne Sullivan (Macy)
‘The Miracle Worker’: famous for teaching the blind and deaf Helen Keller to read, write and speak; died Oct 20, 1936

1889 - Arnold (Joseph) Toynbee
historian, author: A Study of History, The Western Question in Greece and Turkey, The World and the West, Acquaintances, and Experiences; died Oct 22, 1975

1904 - Sir (Arthur) John Gielgud
Academy Award-winning [supporting] actor: Arthur [1981]; Emmy Award-winning actor: Masterpiece Theatre miniseries Summer’s Lease [1990-1991]; Becket, Chariots of Fire, The Elephant Man, Gandhi, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, A Man for All Seasons, Murder on the Orient Express, The Charge of the Light Brigade, War and Remembrance; died May 21, 2000

1923 - Roberto De Vicenzo
golf: champ: British Open [1967]; won 230 tournaments worldwide during career; see 1968 [above]

1924 - Shorty Rogers (Milton Rajonsky)
musician: trumpet, bandleader, songwriter: Keen and Peachy, Martians Go Home, Sweetheart of Sigmund Freud; composer, arranger: film: That Certain Girl; died Nov 7, 1994

1925 - Rod Steiger (Rodney Stephen Steiger)
Academy Award-winning actor: In the Heat of the Night [1967]; On the Waterfront, The Pawnbroker, Dr. Zhivago, The Longest Day, Back Water, In Pursuit of Honor, Mars Attacks!; died July 9, 2002

1927 - Gloria Jean (Schoonover)
actress: Copacabana, The Ladies Man

1930 - Bradford Dillman
actor: Compulsion, The Bridge at Remagen, The Way We Were, Court-Martial, King’s Crossing, Falcon Crest

1930 - Jay Robinson
actor: Sinatra, Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex [But Were Afraid to Ask], My Man Godfrey, The Virgin Queen, Demetrius and the Gladiators, The Robe

1935 - Joan Darling (Kugell)
actress: The President’s Analyst, The Two Worlds of Jenny Logan, Sunnyside

1935 - Marty (Richard Martin) Keough
baseball: Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, Cincinnati Reds, Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs

1935 - Loretta Lynn
country singer: Coal Miner’s Daughter, I’m a Honky-Tonk Girl, One’s on the Way, The Pill; 1st woman to earn the CMA’s Entertainer of the Year award; named ACM Artist of the Decade [1979]

1936 - Bobby Nichols
golfer: PGA Champion [1964]

1941 - Julie Christie
actress: Dr. Zhivago, Petulia, Shampoo, Separate Tables, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Fahrenheit 451

1941 - Pete (Peter Edward) Rose
‘Charlie Hustle’: baseball: Cincinnati Reds [Rookie of the Year: 1963/all-star: 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1985/World Series: 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1973/manager: 1986-89]; Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982/World Series: 1980, 1983], Montreal Expos; banished from baseball [1989] for alleged gambling on major-league games; lifetime totals: hits: 4,256, games: 3,562, at bats: 14,053, lifetime batting average: .303

1942 - Dick Brooks
auto racer: NASCAR legend

1945 - Ritchie Blackmore
musician: guitar: solo: Getaway, Little Brown Jug, LP: Rainbow; groups: Deep Purple: Black Night, Strange Kind of Woman, Fireball, Smoke on the Water; LPs: Deep Purple in Rock, Made in Japan, Who Do We Think We Are?, Machine Head; Rainbow: Since You’ve Been Gone, All Night Long, I Surrender, Stone Cold, LPs: Rainbow Rising, Straight Between the Eyes, Bent Out of Shape

1948 - Larry Ferguson
musician: keyboards: group: Hot Chocolate: Emma, Disco Queen, You Sexy Thing, So You Win Again,\ I’ll Put You Back Together Again, Every 1’s a Winner, Girl Crazy, Chances

1949 - Dennis Bryon
musician: drums: groups: Amen Corner; Bee Gees: Jive Talkin’, Fanny [Be Tender with My Love], How Can You Mend a Broken Heart, How Deep is Your Love

1949 - John Shea
Emmy Award-winning actor: Baby M [1988]; WIOU, Lois & Clark - The New Adventures of Superman, Backstreet Justice, Honey, I Blew Up the Kid, Small Sacrifices, A Case of Deadly Force, Nativity

1968 - Anthony Michael Hall
actor: The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, National Lampoon’s Vacation, Edward Scissorhands; comedian: Saturday Night Live.

ShadowThomas
04-13-2007, 11:01 PM
Page 2 of 1.


Chart Toppers
April 14th.

1944 It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
I Love You - Bing Crosby
Besame Mucho - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Bob Eberly & Kitty
Kallen
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Tell Me Why - The Four Aces
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Greenfields - The Brothers Four
Mama - Connie Francis
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Young Girl - The Union Gap
Cry like a Baby - The Box Tops
You are My Treasure - Jack Greene

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
’Til I Can Make It on My Own - Tammy Wynette

1984 Footloose - Kenny Loggins
Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Thank God for the Radio - The Kendalls


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-14-2007, 11:00 PM
105th day of 2007 - 260 remaining.

Sunday, April 15, 2007
UNSINKABLE? DAY.

The ‘unsinkable’ luxury liner, Titanic, sank at 2:27a.m. on this day in 1912. The largest passenger vessel in the world went under off the coast of Newfoundland two and one-half hours after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City. A young David Sarnoff, later of RCA and NBC, relayed telegraph messages to advise relatives on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean of the 700+ survivors. 1,517 lives were lost at sea. One account claimed that lifeboats weren’t operable and those that were, quickly filled with male passengers and crew members, instead of the traditional women and children first. Reports indicate that the captain of the Titanic, most of the crew and the ship’s orchestra remained on board as the huge luxury liner slid into the icy Atlantic. Still another report, from a survivor, indicated that as the great ship was going down to a watery grave, the orchestra played Nearer My God to Thee.

Many movies and documentaries about the monumental disaster have been filmed over the years. However, none had the exacting data gleaned by scientists from the 1986 expedition aboard Atlantis II. Dr. Robert Ballard headed a crew and a robot named Jason in a descent to the deck of the Titanic aboard Alvin, a submersible craft. They returned with information and photos that challenged and verified stories from the past. After years of studying the facts, the 1997 Academy Award-winning film, Titanic, recreated the ship to the tiniest detail including the design on the elegant china. Although the film’s love story is fictitious, the true tragedy of the Titanic can now be seen by the world some eight decades later.

Events
April 15th.


1794 - Courrier Francais became the first French daily newspaper to be published in the U.S.

1865 - Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States of America, died at 7:22 a.m. Lincoln had been shot in the back of the head the previous evening while attending a performance of Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The assassin, John Wilkes Booth, escaped, only to be hunted down and shot to death. Lincoln was carried to a boarding house across the street from the theatre. He never regained consciousness.

1923 - Insulin became available for general use on this day. It was first discovered in 1922. Today, insulin is used daily in the treatment of diabetes. It is extracted from the pancreas of sheep, oxen and by other means, including synthesization in the laboratory. Insulin, a natural and vital hormone for carbohydrate metabolism in the body, is manufactured by the pancreas. An overabundance of insulin causes insulin shock and leads to a variety of symptoms, including coma.

1923 - Dr. Lee DeForest’s Phonofilm, the first sound-on-sound film, motion picture, was demonstrated for a by-invitation-only audience at the Rivoli Theatre in New York City. The guests saw The Gavotte, a man and woman dancing to old-time music and The Serenade, four musicians who played on wind, percussion and string instruments.

1927 - Serge Koussevitsky directed the Boston Symphony in the first performance of Frederick Converse’s symphony, Flivver Ten Million, a salute to the ‘Tin Lizzie’ automobile.

1934 - Dagwood and Blondie Bumstead welcomed a baby boy, Alexander, to the comic strip, Blondie. The child would be nicknamed, Baby Dumpling.

1947 - Jackie Robinson played his first major-league baseball game (he had played exhibition games previously) for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He went 0-for-4 against Boston. Robinson did get on base due to an error and scored the winning run in a 5-3 win for the Dodgers.

1955 - “Two all beef patties...” This is the anniversary of McDonald’s. Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald’s -- in Des Plaines, IL. Kroc began his career by selling milk shake machines. Among his first customers were the McDonald brothers from Southern California. After selling them several machines and watching the efficiency of their drive-in restaurant, Kroc bought the rights to market the brothers’ good fortune and hired them to work for him. On his first day of business, sales of 15-cent hamburgers and 10-cent French fries totaled $366.12. Thirty years later, McDonald’s grossed a whopping $8.6 billion annually. There is no telling how many burgers have been served at McDonald’s. They stopped counting years ago, saying, “Billions and billions served.” The rest is McHistory with McDonald’s a common sight around the world. The first McDonald’s is no longer. It was torn down to build a newer McDonald’s restaurant across the street. The firm’s worldwide headquarters are located in Oak Brook, IL, the home of ‘Hamburger University’. Have a Big Mac today! You deserve a break.

1956 - The worlds’ first all-color, TV station was dedicated -- in Chicago, IL. It was named WNBQ-TV and is now WMAQ-TV.

1956 - General Motors announced that the first, free piston automobile had been developed.

1971 - George C. Scott refused the Oscar for his Best Actor performance in Patton at the 43rd Annual Academy Awards ceremony at LA’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. He had previously told reporters that he did not want the honor, saying (after the votes had been cast and tallied), “It is degrading to have actors in competition with each other.” Scott called the Oscar ceremony, “a two-hour meat parade, a public display with contrived suspense for economic reasons.” Others who did accept the golden statuette as recognition for their works that evening include: Glenda Jackson, Best Actress (Women in Love); Helen Hayes, Best Supporting Actress (Airport); John Mills, Best Supporting Actor (Ryan’s Daughter); Fred Karlin (music), Robb Royer and James Griffin (lyrics), Best Music/Song, For All We Know from Lovers and Other Strangers; and Franklin J. Schaffner, Best Director (Patton) ... Patton (Frank McCarthy, producer) also received the Best Picture honors. Other notable flicks from 1970 (some Oscar winners, some not): Five Easy Pieces, Love Story, MASH, Tora! Tora! Tora!, Diary of a Mad Housewife.

1973 - The richest women’s golf tournament held (to that day) was won by Mickey Wright. She won the $25,000 first prize in the Colgate-Dinah Shore Golf Classic in Palm Springs, CA.

1985 - Ozzie Smith was awarded a $2-million annual contract by the St. Louis Cardinals. Smith became the richest infielder in baseball with the contract.

1985 - ‘Marvelous’ Marvin Hagler helped Thomas the ‘Hit Man’ Hearns go nighty-night a littler earlier than expected, with a third round knockout to retain the world middleweight boxing title. Some have called the fight, “the greatest three rounds in boxing history.”

Birthdays
April 15th.


1452 - Leonardo da Vinci
artist: Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, The Virgin of the Rocks, The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne; died May 2, 1519

1741 - Charles Willson Peale
artist: portrait painter, primarily of colonial and American Revolutionary War figures; died Feb 22, 1827

1843 - Henry James
author: The Turn of the Screw, The Wings of the Dove, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors; died Feb 28, 1916

1889 - Thomas Benton
artist: regionalism: Cave Spring, Jesse James, mural of Indiana; died in 1975

1894 - Bessie Smith
‘Empress of the Blues’: blues singer: sang with Louis Armstrong in 1925: early version of St. Louis Blues, My Man’s Blues, Dixie Flyer Blues, I Ain’t Got Nobody, A Good Man is Hard to Find, Poor Man’s Blues; died Sep 26, 1937

1917 - Hans Conried
actor: My Friend Irma, Bus Stop, Oh! God: Book 2, Tut & Tuttle, The Monster that Challenged the World; host: Fractured Flickers TV Series; died Jan 5, 1982

1920 - Jim Timmens
Grammy Award-winning composer: Aren’t You Glad You’re You [1977: Best Recording For Children, w/Christopher Cerf]; jazz musician, musical director of New York’s Radio City Music Hall

1922 - Harold Washington
mayor: Chicago: instrumental in tearing apart Chicago’s Democratic Machine of the Richard Daley administration; died Nov 25, 1987

1930 - Herb Pomeroy
musician: trumpet: teacher at Berklee in Boston, bandleader; directed radio Malaysia Orchestra

1933 - Elizabeth Montgomery
actress: Bewitched, Robert Montgomery Presents; died May 18, 1995

1933 - Roy Clark
musician: guitar, banjo; CMA Entertainer of the Year [1973], Comedian of the Year [1970, 1971, 1972], co-host: Hee Haw; country singer: Tips of My Fingers, Through the Eyes of a Fool, Yesterday, When I Was Young, Come and Live with Me, Somewhere Between Love and Tomorrow, Thank God and Greyhound [You’re Gone]

1933 - Mel Kenyon
auto racer: legendary NAMARS champ

1937 - Bob Luman
singer: Let’s Think About Living, Every Day I Have to Cry Some, The Pay Phone, Proud of You Baby; died Dec 27, 1978

1938 - Claudia Cardinale
actress: The Pink Panther, Once Upon a Time in the West, Jesus of Nazareth, Henry the IV, A Man in Love

1940 - Willie (William Henry) Davis
baseball: LA Dodgers [World Series: 1963, 1965, 1966/all-star: 1971, 1973], Montreal Expos, SL Cardinals, Texas Rangers, SD Padres, California Angels

1940 - Woody (Woodrow Thompson) Fryman
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1968], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos [all-star: 1976], Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs

1942 - Walt Hazzard
basketball: 1964 Olympic Gold Medalist: U.S. team; LA Lakers, Seattle Supersonics, Atlanta Hawks, Buffalo Braves, Golden State Warriors; UCLA coach

1942 - Julie Sommars
actress: Sex and the Single Parent, Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo

1945 - Ted Sizemore
baseball: St. Louis Cardinals; National League Rookie of the Year: LA Dodgers 2B [1969]

1950 - Dick (Richard Louis) Sharon
baseball: Detroit Tigers, SD Padres

1950 - Amy Wright
actress: The Scarlet Letter, Final Verdict, Crossing Delancey, The Accidental Tourist, Wise Blood, Breaking Away, The Amityville Horror, The Deer Hunter

1951 - Heloise (Ponce Kiah Marchelle Heloise Cruse Evans)
newspaper columnist, writer: Hints from Heloise; she took over the Heloise empire after her mother, the original Heloise, died in 1977

1957 - Evelyn Ashford
track athlete: 4-time Olympic gold medalist, a shared record for most gold medals won by a woman: 100 meters [1984], 4 x 100m relay [1984, 1988, 1992]

1959 - Emma Thompson
Academy Award-winning actress: Howard’s End [1992], Sense and Sensibility, The Remains of the Day, In the Name of the Father, Look Back in Anger, Henry V; screenwriter: Sense and Sensibility; daughter of producer Eric Thompson, actress Phyllida Law; sister of actress Sophie Thompson

1966 - Graeme Clark
musician: bass: group: Wet Wet Wet: With a Little Help From My Friends, Goodnight Girl, Love is All Around

1966 - Samantha Fox
singer: Naughty Girls [Need Love Too]

Chart Toppers
April 15th.


1945 My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 I Believe - Frankie Laine
Doggie in the Window - Patti Page
Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
Your Cheatin’ Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Blue Moon - The Marcels
Apache - Jorgen Ingmann
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Shirelles
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
You’ve Made Me So Very Happy - Blood, Sweat & Tears
Galveston - Glen Campbell
Woman of the World (Leave My World Alone) - Loretta Lynn

1977 Dancing Queen - Abba
Don’t Give Up on Us - David Soul
Don’t Leave Me This Way - Thelma Houston
Lucille - Kenny Rogers

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Nightshift - Commodores
Honor Bound - Earl Thomas Conley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-15-2007, 11:00 PM
106th day of 2007 - 259 remaining.

Monday, April 16, 2007
LITTLE TRAMP DAY. :D

In his autobiography, he wrote, “There are more valid facts and details in works of art than there are in history books.”

Charlie Chaplin’s life was a work of art and it began on this day in 1889 in London, England. He started on his acting career as a young child, performing on stage, then touring with Fred Karno’s company as a teenager. When he was twenty-four, Chaplin joined Mack Sennett’s Keystone company where he made over thirty films. These films were the making of the cane-twirling clown with the baggy pants. The character of the little tramp came to fulfillment in the 1915 film, The Tramp.

Four years later, he formed United Artists Corporation with other film artists, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith, and produced many independent films including The Gold Rush in 1925, City Lights in 1931 and Modern Times in 1936. His first talkie was The Great Dictator in 1940. And one of his most remembered films was made in 1952, Limelight.

Ostracized from the American film community and denied reentry after a trip abroad, because of his refusal to become an American citizen, his left-wing causes and his marriages to several teenagers, Chaplin lived in Switzerland from 1952 until 1972 with his fourth wife, Oona, the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

In 1972, he returned to the United States (this time he was permitted entry) to accept a special award at the Annual Academy Awards. And, in 1975 he was knighted by the Queen of England. Two years later, on Christmas Day, the little tramp died at his home in Vevey, Switzerland.

Many have imitated or attempted to become the next Charlie Chaplin. However, as Max Sennett once said, Chaplin is the “greatest artist who ever lived.”

Events
April 16th.


1851 - A lighthouse was swept away in a gale at Minot’s Ledge, .

1900 - The first book of U.S. postage stamps was issued. The two-cent stamps were available in books of 12, 24 and 48 stamps.

1905 - An endowment of a college teachers’ pension fund was established by Andrew Carnegie. He donated $10,000,000 of personal money to set up the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

1922 - Belvin Maynard, better known as the ‘Flying Parson’, gave his first sermon from an airplane this day. No, Reverend Maynard was not found guilty of speaking ‘down’ to his flock...

1926 - The Book-of-the-Month Club in New York City chose as its first selection, Lolly Willowes or The Loving Huntsman by Sylvia Townsend as the offering to its 4,750 members.

1940 - The first no-hit, no-run game thrown on an opening day of baseball season was earned by Bob Feller. The Cleveland Indians blanked the Chicago White Sox 1-0.

1947 - Zoomar arrived. No, this is not about some comic book superhero or space alien. Zoomar is a lens demonstrated by NBC-TV in New York City. The Zoomar lens is a device that can feature close-up and long distance camera shots from a stationary camera. Eventually, the lens would be scaled down for use by regular photographers, not just for television. There are many different kinds of close-up/long distance lenses today, including the zoom lens named after the original Zoomar.

1957 - Polly Bergen starred in The Helen Morgan Story on the CBS television presentation of Playhouse 90.

1968 - Baseball’s longest night game was completed -- after 24 innings. The game took six hours, six minutes to play. The winner? The Houston Astros.

1973 - Former Beatle, Paul McCartney, leading the group, Wings, starred in his first TV special titled, James Paul McCartney. The show featured the new group, including Paul’s wife, Linda (on keyboards and backing vocals).

1978 - St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Forsch pitched a no-hitter beating the Phillies 5-0. His brother, Ken, repeated the feat with the Houston Astros a year later, making them the first brothers to throw major-league no-hitters. Bob tossed a second no-hitter in September, 1983, to set a record for Cardinal pitchers.

1985 - Mickey Mantle, banned from baseball in 1983 because of his association with an Atlantic City casino, was reinstated on this day. He threw out the first pitch to a standing ovation as the New York Yankees played their home opener against the Chicago White Sox.

1987 - From the Here’s How Not to Be like Howard Stern file: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) sternly warned U.S. radio stations to watch the use of indecent language on the airwaves. This was directed at shock jocks, like Stern, and those on your neighborhood radio station. Some stations, the FCC noted, had gone way beyond the seven dirty words made famous by comedian George Carlin in a routine from the early 1970s.

Birthdays
April 16th.


1660 - Hans Sloane
doctor, naturalist, collector: instrumental in the founding of the British Museum [the national museum and library of the United Kingdom]: Sloane left his personal collection to Great Britain upon his death; died in 1753

1866 - Jose de Diego
patriot and political leader of Puerto Rico; April 16 is a legal holiday in Puerto Rico in honor of de Diego; died July 17, 1918

1867 - Wilbur Wright
aviator: one of the Wright Brothers; died May 30, 1912

1871 - John Millington Synge
poet, playwright: The Playboy of the Western World, The Aran Islands, Shadow of the Glen, Riders to the Sea, The Well of the Saints; died Mar 24, 1909

1889 - Sir Charles (Spencer) ‘Charlie’ Chaplin
actor, comedian; died Dec 25, 1977; see Little Tramp Day [above]

1913 - Les Tremayne (Henning)
actor: The War of the Worlds, Francis Goes to West Point, The Slime People, I Love Melvin; died Dec 19, 2003

1914 - John Hodiak
actor: The Miniver Story, Conquest of Cochise; died Oct 19, 1955

1919 - Merce Cunningham
dancer, choreographer: films: Changing Steps, Beach Birds for Camera

1920 - Barry Nelson (Nielsen)
actor: Airport, The Shining, Pete ’n’ Tillie, The Human Comedy, Island Claw, Shadow of the Thin Man

1921 - Sir Peter Ustinov
Academy Award-winning actor: Spartacus [1960], Topkapi [1964]; Quo Vadis, Death on the Nile, Beau Brummel; died Mar 28, 2004

1922 - Kingsley Amis
novelist: The Crime of the Century, Lucky Jim; died Oct 22, 1995

1923 - Bennie Green
trombonist, lyricist: The Diamond and the Goose; journalist; died Mar 23, 1977

1924 - Henry Mancini (Enrico Nicola Mancini)
Academy Award-winning composer: Moon River [1961], Days of Wine and Roses [1962], Breakfast at Tiffany’s score [1961], Victor/Victoria score [1982]; composed themes for The Pink Panther, Mr. Lucky, Peter Gunn, Charade, NBC Mystery Movie, NBC Nightly News, Love Theme from Romeo & Juliet; 20 Grammy Awards; died June 14, 1994

1927 - Edie Adams (Elizabeth Edith Enke)
actress: The Apartment, The Oscar, Love with the Proper Stranger, The Ernie Kovacs Show; spokesperson for Muriel Cigars: “Hey big spender, spend a little time with me.”

1929 - Roy Hamilton
singer: You’ll Never Walk Alone, If I Loved You, Ebb Tide, Unchained Melody, Don’t Let Go, You Can Have Her; died July 20, 1969

1930 - Herbie Mann (Soloman)
jazz musician, flautist: Hijack, Superman, Comin’ Home Baby, Bang! Bang!, Violets Don’t be Blue; died July 1, 2003

1933 - Ike Pappas
newsman: CBS News

1935 - Bobby Vinton (Stanley Vintulla)
singer: Roses are Red [My Love], Blue on Blue, Blue Velvet, Mr. Lonely, There! I’ve Said It Again, My Melody of Love

1939 - Dusty Springfield (Mary Isabel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien)
singer: Wishin’ and Hopin’, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, The Look of Love, Son-of-a-Preacher Man, The Windmills of Your Mind, A Brand New Me; group: The Springfields: Silver Threads and Golden Needles; inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [3-15-99]; died Mar 2, 1999

1942 - Jim (James Reynold) Lonborg
baseball: pitcher: Boston Red Sox [Cy Young Award: 1967/World Series: 1967/all-star: 1967], Milwaukee Brewers, Philadelphia Phillies

1947 - Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Lew Alcindor)
Basketball Hall of Famer: LA Lakers, Milwaukee Bucks: NBA career record: games played [1.560], points [38,387], field goals [15,387], blocked shots [3,189] cameo role: Airplane!

1947 - Gerry Rafferty
singer, songwriter: Stuck in the Middle with You, Star, Baker Street

1949 - Bill Spooner
musician: guitar: group: The Tubes: LPs: Young and Rich, T.R.A.S.H., Love Bomb

1953 - Jay O. Sanders
actor: Tucker: The Man and His Dream, Crime Story, Aftermash

1954 - Ellen Barkin
Emmy Award-winning actress: Before Women Had Wings [1997 miniseries]; Diner, Tender Mercies, Wild Bill, Bad Company, Daniel, Sea of Love, Eddie and the Cruisers

1963 - Jimmy Osmond
singer: group: The Osmonds: the youngest Osmond

1965 - Jon Cryer
actor: Heads, Hot Shots!, Superman 4: The Quest for Peace, Pretty in Pink, No Small Affair, Partners, The Famous Teddy Z

1976 - Lukas Haas
actor: Boys, Leap of Faith, Rambling Rose, The Lady in White, Witness, Mars Attacks!

Chart Toppers
April 16th.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief - Betty Hutton
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Cross Over the Bridge - Patti Page
Here - Tony Martin
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares
Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Slow Twistin’ - Chubby Checker
She’s Got You - Patsy Cline

1970 Let It Be - The Beatles
ABC - The Jackson 5
Spirit in the Sky - Norman Greenbaum
Tennessee Bird Walk - Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Someone Loves You Honey - Charley Pride

1986 Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Manic Monday - Bangles
She and I - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-16-2007, 11:00 PM
107th day of 2007 - 258 remaining.

Tuesday, April 17, 2007
IT’S A LO-O-ONG WAR DAY.

We are all aware of short wars like 3-day, 7-day, and 3-month wars, but have you ever heard of a 335-year war? Today is the anniversary of the day such a war officially ended.

In the year 1651, a war began between the Isles of Scilly and the Netherlands. No one seems to know or care what started the war. What seems to be more important is that, although the actual fighting ended in the 17th century, no one had ever officially declared an end to the war until this day in 1986. It was then that the Netherlands ambassador to the Isles of Scilly, Jonkheer Rein Huydecoper, flew to the islands delivering a proclamation that terminated the war.

We’d say that 335 years is a lo-o-ong time to hold a grudge!

Events
April 17th.


1629 - Horses were first imported into the colonies by the Massachusetts Bay Colony on this day.

1704 - John Campbell, known by many as America’s first news vendor, published what would eventually become the first successful American newspaper, the Boston News-Letter.

1810 - Pineapple cheese was patented by Lewis M. Norton. Mr. Norton lived nowhere near pineapples. He was from Troy, PA. Pineapple cheese... Yummy!

1860 - New Yorkers learned of a new law. It required fire escapes to be provided for tenement houses.

1916 - The American Academy of Arts and Letters obtained its charter from Congress.

1933 - Backed by the On the Trail portion of the magnificent Grand Canyon Suite, Johnny Roventini, pillbox hat and all, uttered the words “Call for Philip Morris” for the first time on radio. The famous phrase was said in perfect B flat pitch and tone to perfectly match the accompanying music. This “Call for Philip Morris” phrase became one of the most famous in all of advertising. Here are a few other classics from advertising’s golden age to jog your brain’s memory cells: “See the U.S.A. in your Chevrolet,” “Pepsi Cola hits the spot, 12 full ounces and that’s a lot,” “When better cars are built, Buick will build them,” “Aren’t you glad you use Dial? Don’t you wish everybody did?”

1935 - People gathered around the radio to listen for the first time to what would become the ultimate horror show on NBC Radio. Lights Out remained on radio until 1946.

1941 - Igor Sikorsky accomplished the first successful helicopter (or heliocopter as it was called then) lift-off from water near Stratford, CT.

1956 - Two of the greats began their major-league baseball careers this day: Luis Aparicio played for the Chicago White Sox and Don Drysdale began work with the Brooklyn (later, LA) Dodgers. Aparicio became the American League Rookie of the Year. Drysdale won 209 games before he retired. Both were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY on the same day, August 12, 1984. Drysdale later became a broadcaster for the Chicago White Sox and the Dodgers.

1961 - The 33rd Annual Academy Awards ceremony, hosted by Bob Hope, ended the ten year drought during which producer, writer, director Billy Wilder could not capture the elusive Oscar. Wilder was no stranger to Oscar, though. He had three of the golden statuettes sitting on his mantle (or wherever the Wilders keep their awards) from previous years. But this year, the winnings were much sweeter. Not only did Mr. Wilder receive the Oscar for Best Writing/Story and Screenplay/Written Directly for the Screen (shared with I.A.L. Diamond) and the Best Director Oscar (both for The Apartment), he and The Apartment also received the top award, Best Picture. There were other happy Oscar recipients this night at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, as well. Burt Lancaster took the Best Actor honors and Shirley Jones, the Best Supporting Actress, for their performances in Elmer Gantry. Elizabeth Taylor was voted Best Actress for her role in Butterfield 8. Spartacus, nominated in six categories, won four Oscars, including one for Peter Ustinov as Best Actor in a Supporting Role. The Best Music/Song was awarded to Never on Sunday and Manos Hadjidakis from the foreign flick: Pote tin Kyriaki. Yes, we know ... it’s all Greek to you. Some one-Oscar wonder films from 1960: Sons and Lovers, The Alamo, The Time Machine, Exodus. Some multi-nominations but no wins from that year include: Inherit the Wind, The Sundowners, Cimarron, Sunrise at Campobello, Psycho, Bells are Ringing, The Magnificent Seven, Can-Can.

1964 - The CBS television network paid $1,800,000 for the rights to the 1964-1965 National Football League (NFL) Championship games.

1967 - Comedian Joey Bishop got the opportunity to attempt to unseat the king of late night, Johnny Carson. The Joey Bishop Show made its debut on ABC-TV this night. Bishop, Regis Philbin (announcer) and Johnny Mann (music) couldn’t beat Carson, but held out until December 26, 1969 (the show’s last broadcast).

1970 - The breakup of the most influential rock group in music history was official when Paul McCartney’s solo LP, McCartney, was released. Paul played all the instruments himself on this Apple album.

1971 - Joy to the World, by Three Dog Night, made it to the top of the pop music charts on this day. The song was number one for six weeks. Now that’s a hit!

1972 - Betcha by Golly, Wow, by The Stylistics from Philadelphia, earned a gold record for the group. The Stylistics also scored million sellers with You are Everything, I’m Stone in Love with You, Break Up to Make Up and You Make Me Feel Brand New. The smooth R&B group could have won an award for the most creative use of the words, Betcha, by Golly, Wow, too, if anyone had thought about it...

1985 - The U.S. Postal Service unveiled its new 22-cent LOVE stamp. In a clever promotion, the USPS used the set of ABC-TV’s The Love Boat as a backdrop. The stamp went on to become one of the most popular ever offered by the postal service.

1985 - Many fans of the TV soap opera, Days of Our Lives, lined up in Hollywood, CA in hopes of getting the hottest tickets in town -- for the wedding of Bo and Hope on the popular soap. It was the first soap wedding open to fans.

Birthdays
April 17th.


1837 - J.P. (John Pierpoint) Morgan
financier; died Mar 31, 1913

1894 - Nikita Khrushchev
U.S.S.R. premier [1958-1964]; died Sep 11, 1971

1897 - Thornton Wilder
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: The Bridge of San Luis Rey [1928] and playwright: Our Town [1938], The Skin of Our Teeth [1943]; died Dec 7, 1975

1903 - Gregor Piatigorsky
Russian-born cellist: performed worldwide; teacher: Univ. Southern California; died Aug 6, 1976

1905 - Arthur Lake (Silverlake)
actor: Blondie series, It’s a Great Life; died Jan 9, 1987

1916 - Sirimavo Bandaranaike
Ceylon Prime Minister: first woman prime minister in the world; died Oct 10, 2000

1918 - William Holden (Beedle Jr.)
Academy Award-winning actor: Stalag 17 [1953], Love is a Many-Splendored Thing, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Born Yesterday, The Bridges at Toko-Ri, Casino Royale, The Moon is Blue, Network, Picnic, Sunset Boulevard, The Towering Inferno, The World of Suzie Wong; died Nov 16, 1981

1923 - Lindsay Anderson
director: This Sporting Life, The Whales of August, Glory! Glory!, Britannia Hospital, If..., O Lucky Man!; died Aug 30, 1994

1923 - Solly (Solomon Joseph) Hemus
baseball: SL Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies

1923 - Harry Reasoner
newsman: Sixty Minutes, CBS Sunday Night News with Harry Reasoner, ABC News with Harry Reasoner and Barbara Walters; died Aug 6, 1991

1924 - Roy Gallant
author: Mirages & Sundogs, Earth’s Vanishing Forests

1930 - Chris Barber
musician: trombone, bandleader: Petite Fleur; appeared in film: Look Back in Anger

1934 - Warren Chiasson
jazz musician: vibes: group: Warren Chiasson Duo: LP: Point Counterpoint

1934 - Don Kirshner
music publisher: Aldon Music with Al Nevins, Brill Building mogul: Screen Gems Music: started Bubblegum music fad with creation of The Monkees

1935 - Lamar Lundy
football: LA Rams

1943 - Dennis Hextall
hockey: NHL: NY Rangers, LA Kings, California Golden Seals, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings, Washington Capitals; son of Hockey Hall of Famer Bryan A. Hextall

1944 - Bobby Curtola
singer: one of Canada’s early teen idols: Hand In Hand With You, Don’t You Sweetheart Me, Three Rows Over, Fortune Teller; TV host: After Four, Shake, Rock, Roll

1949 - Monroe Eley
football: British Columbia Lions

1950 - Pedro (Modesto Delfi) Garcia
baseball: Milwaukee Brewers, Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays

1951 - Olivia Hussey
actress: Ice Cream Man, Stephen King’s It, Psycho 4: The Beginning, Death on the Nile, The Bastard, Romeo and Juliet

1955 - Pete Shelley (McNeish)
musician, singer: group: The Buzz****s: Totally from the Heart, Alright O.K., Going Steady, Love Bites, What Do I Get, Orgasm Addict, Ever Fallen In Love With Someone You Shouldn’t Fall in Love With, I Don't Mind, Promises

1959 - Sean Bean
actor: Goldeneye, Sharpe’s series, Patriot Games, The Field, Stormy Monday, The Lord of the Rings series

1959 - Stephen Singleton
musician: saxophone: group: ABC: Tears are Not Enough, Poison Arrow, Be Near Me, When Smokey Sings, King Without a Crown

1961 - Boomer (Norman) Esiason
football: quarterback: NY Jets, Cincinnati Bengals [Super Bowl XXIII]; TV commentator: ABC Monday Night Football [1998-1999]

1967 - Liz Phair
singer, songwriter: LPs: Exile in Guyville, whitechocolatespaceegg.

Chart Toppers
April 17th.


1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
How are Things in Glocca Morra - Buddy Clark
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Fess Parker
Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
South Street - The Orlons
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Another Day/Oh Woman Oh Why - Paul McCartney
Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean
Empty Arms - Sonny James

1979 What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Knock on Wood - Amii Stewart
Music Box Dancer - Frank Mills
(If Loving You is Wrong) I Don’t Want to Be Right - Barbara Mandrell

1987 Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me) - Aretha Franklin & George Michael
Don’t Dream It’s Over - Crowded House
"You’ve Got" the Touch - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-17-2007, 11:00 PM
108th day of 2007 - 257 remaining.

Wednesday, April 18, 2007
MIDNIGHT RIDE DAY.

At about 10 p.m. on this day in 1775, three men took to their horses to ride from Boston to Concord, MA to warn the citizens of the approaching British army. Most of us know of just one of those riders, one Paul Revere. The famous poem, Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, glorified the Bostonian as the lone rider. He was, in fact, accompanied by William Dawes and Samuel Prescott.

We think it’s time they should get some recognition too! After all, it wasn’t their fault that their partner in the midnight ride was already well known, having been a member of the Sons of Liberty; incited the British by publishing an engraving of the Boston Massacre; carried messages for the Committees of Correspondence, an underground organization; and having been a participant in the Boston Tea Party.

Incidentally, only Prescott made it all the way to Concord. Revere was nabbed by a British cavalry patrol near Lexington, MA (Dawes and Prescott escaped). We’re not sure what happened to Dawes but Revere was released and returned to Lexington -- without his horse. There was lots of running/riding around that night, but suffice to say, when British forces arrived in Lexington, they found the minutemen waiting for them.

In honor of this midnight ride, get out your Revereware and make a pot of tea.

Events
April 18th.

1796 - The Archers, the first opera written by an American composer, was performed in New York City. Benjamin Carr wrote the work.

1846 - The telegraph ticker (“....- ....- -----”) was patented by R.E. House of New York City. What does the telegraph message above say? “440”.

1877 - Charles Cros wrote a paper on that described the process of recording and reproducing sound. In France, Mr. Cros is still regarded as the inventor of the phonograph, while in the U.S., Thomas Edison gets the credit.

1895 - New York State passed an act that established free public baths! They were to be open 14 hours a day and provide hot and cold water.

1906 - The Great San Francisco Earthquake occurred at 5:13 a.m. The tremendous earthquake was responsible for some 3,000 deaths and catastrophic damage. There were many fires that followed the quake and they took days -- even weeks -- to contain. Survivors of the earthquake gathered annually for memorial services beginning at the moment the predawn temblor struck and became history.

1910 - Walter R. Brookins made the first airplane flight at night. He passed over Montgomery, AL. At least he was pretty sure it was Montgomery...

1923 - Yankee Stadium opened in the Bronx, NY as the hometown team, the NY Yankees, hosted the Boston Red Sox. A record crowd of 74,000 fans saw the action at the first three-level stadium in the U.S.

1929 - Red Nichols and his Five Pennies recorded the Glenn Miller arrangement of Indiana for Brunswick Records. Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa and Jack Teagarden were all part of the recording session that took place in New York City.

1934 - The first Laundromat opened -- in Fort Worth, TX. For the first time, folks could rent washing machines for laundering clothes. Eventually progress made it possible to rent dryers, too!

1945 - It was on Ie Shima, a small island off Okinawa, that Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ernie Pyle’s career came to an end. Worrying more about his Army buddies than himself, he didn’t take cover but turned to ask if they were OK while under Japanese sniper fire. He took a bullet in the left temple. A memorial on the site where Ernest T. Pyle was killed reads, “At this spot the 77th Infantry Division lost a buddy. Ernie Pyle 18 April 1945.” Once buried there, his remains now lie at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Punchbowl Crater on Oahu, Hawaii. Pyle was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.

1953 - Possibly the longest measured home run ever hit in a major-league baseball game was credited to New York Yankees slugger Mickey Mantle on this day. ‘The Mick’ hit a 565-foot homer in Griffith Stadium in Washington, DC.

1956 - Eddie Rommel, a baseball umpire, wore eyeglasses, a first for the game. This game was between the NY Yankees and Washington Senators.

1957 - Comedian Johnny Carson turned briefly to TV acting in a role on the Playhouse 90 production of Three Men on a Horse on CBS-TV. Carson, of Who Do You Trust? fame, was five years from becoming the host of The Tonight Show.

1960 - The Mutual Broadcasting System was sold to the 3M Company of Minnesota for $1.25 million. Previously, the network had been owned by MONY (Mutual of New York).

1965 - Contralto Marian Anderson ended her 30-year singing career with a concert at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

1966 - Bob Hope did it again after six years! He both hosted and received an award at the 38th Annual Academy Awards celebration at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Los Angeles. This time he received a gold medal, the Honorary Award for unique and distinguished service to the film industry and the Academy. Other award recipients included Shelley Winters for her Best Supporting Actress role in A Patch of Blue; Martin Balsam, Best Supporting Actor for his performance in A Thousand Clowns. The Best Actor Oscar went to Lee Marvin (Cat Ballou); and Julie Christie picked up the Best Actress Oscar (Darling). The Oscar for the Best Music/Song from a 1965 movie was The Shadow of Your Smile from The Sandpiper (Johnny Mandel-music, Paul Francis Webster-lyrics). It’s a good thing that the Oscars were being broadcast in color this night (the first time) because the Best Director and Best Picture winner was The Sound of Music (Robert Wise, producer and director). We don’t think the hills wouldn’t look very alive in black and white.

1974 - James Brown, the ‘Godfather of Soul’, received a gold record this day for the single, The Payback. Of the 44 hits that Brown would put on the charts over three decades, he received only one other gold record -- for Get on the Good Foot - Part 1 in 1972. His biggest pop hits include: I Got You (I Feel Good) at number three in 1965, Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag at number eight in 1965, It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World at number eight in 1966, I Got The Feelin’ at number six in 1968 and Living in America at number four in 1986. This song was featured in the Sylvester Stallone film, Rocky IV.

1981 - Tom Seaver of the Cincinnati Reds became the fifth pitcher in the history of major-league baseball to earn 3,000 strikeouts in a career. Seaver struck out Keith Hernandez for the historic ‘K’. The Cardinals, however, beat Tom Terrific, 10-4.

1984 - Michael Jackson faced surgery in Los Angeles. Doctors performed scalp surgery to repair damage done after the megastar’s hair caught fire during the filming of a Pepsi commercial on January 27. Jackson was hospitalized and recuperated for months before he could return to work. His single recording of Thriller had been certified platinum in February, 1984.

1985 - The sequined ‘King of Show Business’, Liberace, broke his own record for ticket sales at Radio City Music Hall. Liberace grossed more than $2,000,000 for his engagement in the historic New York City venue. His previous record was set in 1984 ($1.6 million in tickets sold).

Birthdays
April 18th.

1857 - Clarence Darrow
attorney: famous Scopes ‘monkey trial’; died Mar 13, 1938

1880 - Sam (Samuel Earl) Crawford
‘Wahoo Sam’: Baseball Hall of Famer: Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers [all-star: 1907, 1908, 1909]; holds individual career record of 312 triples; died June 15, 1968

1882 - Leopold Stokowski
conductor: Philadelphia Orchestra; died Sep 13, 1977

1918 - Tony Mottola
guitarist: played with Al Caiola, George Hall’s orchestra, CBS radio studio orchestra, worked w/Raymond Scott backing up young Frank Sinatra and Perry Como, arranger for Como’s TV variety show; composer: films: Running on Empty, Violated

1921 - Barbara Hale
actress: Perry Mason, The Oklahoman, The Defense Never Rests, Airport
1930 - Clive Revill
actor: The Sea Wolf, The Empire Strikes Back, The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

1936 - Don Ohl
basketball: Detroit Pistons, Baltimore Bullets, Atlanta Hawks

1937 - Robert Hooks
actor: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, A Woman Called Moses, Heat Wave, The Execution, Passenger 57, Day of Absence, Where’s Daddy?

1938 - Hal Galper
jazz pianist: group: Hal Galper Quintet; played with Cannonball Adderley, Donald Byrd, Stan Getz, Chuck Mangione, Joe Henderson; author: The Touring Musician

1938 - Richie Pettibone
football: Washington Redskins; coach: Oregon State University

1941 - Walt Sweeney
football: Syracuse Univ; NFL: San Diego Chargers

1941 - Mike Vickers
musician: guitar, reeds: group: Manfred Mann: Why Should We Not, ****-A-Hoop, 5-4-3-2-1, Do Wah Diddy Diddy, Oh No Not My Baby, If You Gotta Go, Go Now, Just like a Woman, The Mighty Quinn, Pretty Flamingo, Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James, The One in the Middle

1942 - Steve Blass
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1971/all-star: 1972]

1942 - Pete Gogolak
football: first soccer-style kicker in pro football: Buffalo Bills, NY Giants

1942 - Jochen Rindt
auto racer: Grand Prix champ: U.S. [1969], Monaco GP, Dutch, French, British, German [1970]; killed Sep 5, 1970 during practice for Italian Grand Prix

1946 - Hayley Mills
actress: The Parent Trap, The Moon Spinners, Pollyanna; singer: Let’s Get Together

1946 - Alexander ‘Skip’ Spence
musician: drummer: Jefferson Airplane; guitar, singer: group: Moby Grape; died Apr 16, 1999

1947 - Dorothy Lyman
actress: All My Children, Mama’s Family, Camp Cucamonga: How I Spent My Summer Vacation, Ruby in Paradise

1947 - James Woods
actor: The Onion Field, Holocaust, The Way We Were, Night Moves, Against All Odds, Salvador, Casino, Nixon

1953 - Rick Moranis
actor: Little Giants, The Flintstones, My Blue Heaven, Parenthood, Honey I Shrunk the Kids series, Ghostbusters series, Spaceballs, Little Shop of Horrors, Brewster’s Millions, SCTV; writer: Strange Brew

1956 - John James
actor: Search for Tomorrow, Dynasty, As the World Turns; son of WABC personality Herb Oscar Anderson

1956 - Eric Roberts
actor: Doctor Who, The Hard Truth, Fugitive Among Us, A Family Matter, Descending Angel, To Heal a Nation, The Pope of Greenwich Village, The Coca-Cola Kid, Star 80, Raggedy Man, King of the Gypsies; brother of actress Julia Roberts

1961 - Jane Leeves
actress: Frasier, Throb, Miracle on 34th Street, Mr. Write

1963 - Conan O’Brien
TV talk show host: Late Night with Conan O’Brien; Emmy Award-winning writer: Saturday Night Live [1989]; The Simpsons; producer: Lockwell; comedian: Not Necessarily the News

1976 - Melissa Joan Hart
actress: Clarissa Explains It All, Twisted Desire, Sabrina the Teenage Witch.

Chart Toppers
April 18th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
But Beautiful - Frank Sinatra
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
Long Tall Sally - Little Richard
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Suspicion - Terry Stafford
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Rockin’ Robin - Michael Jackson
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
Honky Tonk Blues - Charley Pride

1988 Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car - Billy Ocean
Devil Inside - INXS
Where Do Broken Hearts Go - Whitney Houston
I Wanna Dance with You - Eddie Rabbitt


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-18-2007, 11:00 PM
109th day of 2007 - 256 remaining.

Thursday, April 19, 2007
MARATHON DAY.

On this day in 1897, the first annual Boston Marathon -- the first of its type in the United States -- was run. John J. McDermott of New York City won.

This marathon attracts world-class, and some not so world-class, runners from around the world. Previous runners who have claimed 1st place in the 26-mile marathon through the streets of Boston include Rosie Ruiz who, apparently, didn’t run the race at all, but merely joined in a short distance from the finish line and claimed first place! Another participant supposedly took a taxi cab around the course and waited until the right time to join in -- and won! The prizes were, however, taken away from those who didn’t run the Boston Marathon fair and square.

A fine example of the tireless men and women who train to run in this premier event is Shigeki Tanaka, a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bombing, who won the Boston Marathon in 1951.

Many thousands of runners participate in marathon races such as the Boston Marathon, making these events colorful and exciting to witness. Hundreds of thousands of spectators turn out to cheer the runners in these grueling tests of strength and stamina.

Events
April 19th.

1892 - The Duryea gasoline buggy was first driven in the United States.

1924 - A new show joined the airwaves. The Chicago Barn Dance aired on WLS radio in the Windy City. Later, the famous program would be renamed The National Barn Dance. This program was the first country music jamboree on radio. (The Grand Ole Opry on WSM Radio in Nashville, TN began in 1925.) National Barn Dance continued for many years on the radio station that was owned by retailer, Sears Roebuck & Co. WLS, in fact, stood for ‘World’s Largest Store’. Though the Barn Dance gave way to rock music and now, talk radio, The Grand Ole Opry continues each weekend in Nashville.

1940 - Paavo Nurmi, a runner from Finland, predicted that a four-minute mile would be run within the next decade. He was off by only 4 years! Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile at Oxford, England in a time of 3:59.4 on May 6, 1954. Don Bowden was the first American runner to break the mark with a 3:58.7 mile at Stockton, California on June 1, 1957. Jim Beatty became the first sub-four-minute indoor mile runner with a 3:58.9 mark in Los Angeles on February 10, 1962.

1945 - The musical Carousel, based on Molnar’s Liliom, opened at the Majestic Theatre in New York City. John Raitt and Jan Clayton starred in the show which ran for 890 performances. Music was by the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein.

1951 - General Douglas MacArthur spoke before Congress. The highlight of this memorable address was General MacArthur stating, “Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.”

1951 - Shigeki Tanaka, who survived the atomic blast at Hiroshima, Japan in World War II, won the Boston Marathon.

1956 - Actress Grace Kelly became Princess Grace of Monaco on this day. The beloved U.S. actress from Philadelphia married Prince Rainier III of Monaco in a storybook wedding. More than 1,500 radio, TV, newspaper and magazine reporters were on hand for the event in Monaco, as were most of the citizens of the tiny country.

1956 - Major-league baseball came to New Jersey for the first time as the Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City. Walter O’Malley’s Dodgers played several games in New Jersey during the 1956 season, taking a major step toward vacating Ebbets Field and moving to LA. The Dodgers broke the hearts of many in Flatbush who rallied around the team. Many still talk about the team like it was just yesterday when they played in Brooklyn. Ebbets Field was named for Charles Ebbets and was built, beginning in 1912, on a plot of land he purchased for $500.

1958 - The San Francisco Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers met for the first time as major-league baseball came to the West Coast.

1959 - Singer Harry Belafonte appeared in the first of two benefit concerts for charity at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

1967 - Nancy Sinatra and her dad, Frank, found a gold record award in the mailbox, for their collaboration on the hit single, Something Stupid.

1981 - The first major-league baseball team to win 11 straight games at the beginning of a season was the Oakland A’s. Win number 11 came with a few fireworks, as a brawl or two became a part of a 6-1 victory over Seattle in the first game of a doubleheader. In the second game, however, Seattle ended the A’s win streak with a 3-2 win.

1985 - A Central Regional High School student, Al Leiter, used a blazing 85-mph fastball to strike out 32 batters on the way to a 0-0 tie! The game, played in Berkeley Township, NJ, was called after 13 innings. Leiter’s effort was just five short of the record set in 1971. When asked about the game being called at that time, Leiter looked at reporters and said, “Darn. Excuse me, folks, I have to go screw my arm back in place...”

1993 - The Branch-Davidian’s compound in Waco, Texas burned to the ground. It was the anticlimax of a 51-day standoff between the religious cult led by David Koresh and U.S. federal agents (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms). 86 perished including 17 children. Koresh and his followers opted not to surrender themselves and the children to the agents; exchanging gun fire, instead. Nine members of the cult escaped.

1995 - The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, OK was destroyed by a bomb estimated at 5,000 pounds, hidden in a rent-a-truck. The blast was the worst bombing on U.S. soil. Timothy McVeigh was charged with terroristic murder. 168 people including 19 children died in the blast. 490 were injured. On June 2, 1997, McVeigh was found guilty on 11 different counts, including several first degree murder convictions for the deaths of federal officers. He was executed (lethal injection) on June 11, 2001 at the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana. Terry L. Nichols, an Army buddy of McVeigh, was sentenced to life in prison.

2000 - “The empty chairs are a simple yet powerful portrayal of someone’s absence. Like an empty chair at a dinner table, we are always aware of the presence of a loved one’s absence,” said architects Hans and Torrey Butzer and Sven Berg, explaining their inclusion of 168 bronze and stone chairs, each inscribed with a victim's name and mounted on a glass base, the focus at the opening of the Oklahoma City National Memorial. This memorial marks the place where 168 people died in 1995 in the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history. A new expanse of green lawn was once the site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, and a 320-foot-long reflecting pool lined with black stone has replaced the bombed-out street. The chairs, symbolic of tombstones, are also placed in symbolic positions: Nine rows representing the nine floors of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, with each victim's chair placed in the row according to the floor on which he or she worked or was visiting at the time of the blast. 19 of the chairs are smaller, representing the children who were murdered in the attack. Ironically, A 70-year-old elm tree survived the bombing. “The Survivor Tree” is now protected by the Rescuer's Orchard: Fruit trees symbolic of the many rescue workers who pulled survivors from the rubble.

Birthdays
April 19th.


1772 - David Ricardo
economist, author: The High Price of Bullion, a Proof of the Depreciation of Bank Notes, Principles of Political Economy and Taxation; died Sep 11, 1823

1905 - Tommy Benford
drummer: with Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers; died in 1994

1920 - Frank Fontaine
comedian, actor, singer: The Jackie Gleason Show; died Aug 4, 1978

1925 - Hugh O’Brian (Krampke)
actor: In Harm’s Way, Little Big Horn, There’s No Business like Show Business, Twins, Broken Lance, Ten Little Indians, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp

1927 - Don Barbour
singer: group: The Four Freshmen [1953-1960]: Graduation Day, Charmaine, Blue World

1928 - Alexis Korner
musician: guitar, singer: Whole Lotta Love; died Jan 1, 1984

1930 - Dick Sargent (Richard Cox)
actor: Bewitched, That Touch of Mink, Body Count, Fantasy Island; died July 8, 1994

1931 - Alex Webster
football: North Carolina State Univ., NY Giants

1933 - Jayne Mansfield (Vera Jane Palmer)
actress: Pete Kelly’s Blues, It Takes a Thief, The Girl Can’t Help It; killed in car crash near New Orleans LA June 29, 1967

1934 - Dickie Goodman (Richard Dorian Goodman)
entertainer: group: Buchanan and Goodman: Flying Saucer [Parts 1 & 2], Mr. Jaws; died Nov 6, 1989

1935 - Dudley Moore
actor: Arthur, Arthur 2, 10, Crazy People, Parallel Lives, Bedazzled, The Hound of the Baskervilles; died Mar 27, 2002

1936 - Wilfried Martens
Belgium Prime Minister

1937 - Elinor Donahue
actress: Father Knows Best, The Andy Griffith Show, Get a Life, Pretty Woman

1941 - Alan Price
musician: keyboards, singer: groups: Alan Price Combo, The Animals: House of the Rising Sun, We Gotta Get Out of This Place

1942 - Larry (Hilario) Ramos Jr.
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Association: Everything that Touches You, soundtrack for film, Goodbye Columbus

1943 - Eve Graham (Evelyn May Beatsom)
singer: group: The New Seekers: Look What They’ve Done to My Song Ma, I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing

1943 - Czeslaw Bartkowski
jazz composer, musician: drums: has recorded over 80 LPs

1946 - Tim Curry
actor: Muppet Treasure Island, Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Oscar, Stephen King’s It, The Hunt for Red October, Oliver Twist, Annie, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, My Favorite Year, Amadeus, Hair, Wiseguy, The Legend of Prince Valiant, voice of King Chicken in cartoon: Duckman, Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events

1947 - Mark Volman
musician: saxophone, singer: groups: Nightriders, Crossfires, The Turtles: It Ain’t Me Babe, Let Me Be, You Baby, Happy Together, She’d Rather be with Me, Elenore, You Showed Me; duo: Phlorescent Leech and Eddie aka Flo and Eddie: LP: Rock Steady with Flo and Eddie

1949 - Lynn Powis
hockey: NHL: Chicago Blackhawks, Kansas City Scouts

1956 - Sue Barker
tennis: French Open Champion: Women’s Singles [1976]

Chart Toppers
April 19th.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The
Skyliners)
Red Roses for a Blue Lady - Vaughn Monroe
Forever and Ever - Perry Como
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
Party Doll - Buddy Knox
Come Go with Me - The Dell-Vikings
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 I’m Telling You Now - Freddie & The Dreamers
Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders
I Know a Place - Petula Clark
King of the Road - Roger Miller

1973 The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia - Vicki Lawrence
Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree - Dawn featuring Tony
Orlando
Sing - Carpenters
A Shoulder to Cry On - Charley Pride

1981 Kiss on My List - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Old Flame - Alabama

1989 She Drives Me Crazy - Fine Young cannibals
Like a Prayer - Madonna
Funky Cold Medina - Tone Loc
I’m No Stranger to the Rain - Keith Whitley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-19-2007, 11:00 PM
110th day of 2007 - 255 remaining.

Friday, April 20, 2007
BE HAPPY, GO LUCKY DAY. ;)

Your Hit Parade, starring Kay Thompson, Charles Carlyle, Gogo DeLys and Johnny Hanser, was first broadcast on radio this night in 1935. A youngster named Frank Sinatra would later be part of the program as a featured vocalist. Your Hit Parade stayed on the radio airwaves for 24 years.

Snooky Lanson (seen here on the right) would later host the program when it made the transition from radio to TV. Other long-time regulars on the TV version were (left to right): Russell Arms, Gisele MacKenzie and Dorothy Collins. They were the lucky ones who got to present the top seven songs each week.

Since many songs stayed on the list for weeks on end, these vocalists had to invent new ways to present the hit parade. On April 24, 1959, Your Hit Parade died. The regulars just didn’t fit with the new rock ’n’ roll hits. Imagine, if you can, Snooky Lanson singing Hound Dog.

The original title of the radio show was, Lucky Strike Hit Parade, sponsored by, you guessed it, Lucky Strike cigarettes. The cigarette company continued to sponsor the TV show (those were the days when cigarette companies sponsored lots of TV shows); and the opening theme song was Be Happy, Go Lucky.

Events
April 20th.


1832 - The U.S. Congress and President Andrew Jackson made Hot Springs, Arkansas the first Federal Reservation in order to protect the hot springs flowing from the southwestern slope of Hot Springs Mountain. Although Hot Springs Federal Reservation's name wasn't changed to Hot Springs National Park until 1921, Hot Springs is the oldest park in the National Park System. Yellowstone National Park was the first to bear the title of ‘National Park’. It became a national park in 1872.

1865 - Safety matches were first advertised this day.

1931 - Louis Armstrong recorded the classic, When It’s Sleepy Time Down South, for Okeh Records. Satchmo would use the tune as his theme song for decades. The song was waxed in Chicago, IL.

1931 - The great Knute Rockne died in a plane crash on March 31, 1931. It would be tough to fill his shoes. On this day, twenty days later, Jesse Harper became the new athletic director and Heartley ‘Hunk’ Anderson took over as coach of Notre Dame. Anderson coached the Fighting Irish from 1931-33. Elmer Layden replaced Anderson from 1934-40 and Frank Leahy coached Notre Dame twice -- from 1941-43 and from 1946-53.

1934 - One of America’s most beloved child stars made her debut. Shirley Temple debuted in Stand Up and Cheer, which opened in New York City. Moviegoers would rave about her song and dance routine, Baby, Take a Bow, for many years.

1947 - Comedian Fred Allen of Allen’s Alley fame didn’t find things so funny when censors cut him off the air during his radio broadcast. Allen was telling a joke about a mythical network vice-president when he was suddenly taken off the air. One moment please...

1949 - Willie Shoemaker won his first race as a jockey aboard Shafter V at Golden Gate Fields in Albany, CA, not far from San Francisco.

1959 - Desilu Playhouse on CBS-TV presented a two-part show titled, The Untouchables starting this night. Robert Stack starred in the program and became a major television star when The Untouchables become a weekly network series in the fall of 1959.

1961 - The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) gave approval for FM stereo broadcasting. It would be another five or six years before FM stations went ‘underground’ or ‘progressive’ to attract listeners who were tired of the lack of audio quality on AM stations. FM stations to that time had broadcast in glorious monaural sound.

1969 - Ken Harrelson just about quit major-league baseball this day. Harrelson was being traded from the Boston Red Sox, an American League contender, to the Cleveland Indians, a perennial American League non-contender. However, the almighty dollar came to the rescue and Harrelson played for the Tribe in Cleveland after all.

1979 - Johnny Carson was said to be leaving The Tonight Show. Newspapers around the country gave details about why the comedian and late-night host was said to be unhappy after 17 years on the show. Guess what? More moola, more vacation time and a four-day week (not working Mondays) was enough for the ‘Great Carsoni’ to hang around NBC for another 12 years...

1985 - The British pop music group Wham!, featuring George Michael, became the first to release cassettes in the People’s Republic of China. Selections from two of the group’s albums were packaged and sold on the tape.

1987 - Starlight Express posted the largest week’s gross in Broadway history. The roller-skating musical earned $606,081 at the box office. The revival of The King and I starring Yul Brynner had been the previous leader (1985).

Birthdays
April 20th.

1850 - Daniel Chester French
sculptor: public monuments: Minute Man statue in Concord, MA, Abraham Lincoln seated in the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC; died Oct 7, 1931

1889 - Adolf Hitler
murderer of over six-million people, the ultimate racist and as TIME magazine said, “...redefined the meaning of evil forever.”; committed suicide Apr 30, 1945

1893 - Harold Lloyd
comedian, actor: For Heaven’s Sake, Slapstick, Feet First, Safety Last, The Sin of Harold Diddlebock; died Mar 8, 1971

1893 - Joan Miro
artist: Chiffres et Constellations, Le Carnaval d’Arlequin, The Gold of Azure; died Dec 25, 1983

1900 - Norman Norell (Norman David Levinson)
costume designer: Astoria Studio of Paramount Pictures; fashion designer: worked w/Charles Armour, Hattie Carnegie, Anthony Traina [Traina-Norell collection], solo: American fashion leader [1941-1972]; died Oct 25, 1972

1908 - Lionel Hampton
singer, songwriter, jazz musician: vibes, drums, piano, bandleader: On the Sunny Side of the Street, Hey! Hot Mallets, Ba-Ba-Re-Bop, Rag Mop; played with Benny Goodman; died Aug 31, 2002

1920 - John Paul Stevens
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the U.S.

1924 - Nina Foch (Nina Consuelo Maud Fock)
actress: Scaramouche, Spartacus, The Ten Commandments, An American in Paris, Mahogany

1925 - Tito (Ernest) Puente
jazz musician, bandleader: Abanaquito, Para Los Rumberos, Jumpin’ with Symphony Sid, Fancy Feet; died June 1, 2000

1925 - Henri Renaud
French jazz musician: pianist; record producer

1926 - Elena Verdugo
actress: Little Giant, House of Frankenstein, Meet Millie, Marcus Welby, M.D.

1927 - Phil Hill
race driver: one of only two Americans to win the Formula One title [1961]

1929 - Bob Braun
Emmy Award-winning TV host [WLWT-TV]: The Bob Braun Show [1979]; regular on WCPO-TV's The Dottie Mack Show [carried on DuMont TV net]; radio host [WLW]: inducted into Cincinnati Radio Hall of Fame [1993]; singer: ’Til Death Do Us Part [1962]; actor: Die Hard 2, Ironside, Murder, She Wrote, The Young and the Restless; died Jan 15, 2001

1936 - Beaver Harris (William Godwin Harris)
musician: drums: co-led 360 Degree Music Experience [w/Roswell Rudd, Marion Brown, Grachan Moncur III]; died Dec 22, 1991

1937 - George Takei
actor: Star Trek, Kissinger and Nixon, Oblivion, Star Trek 1-6, The Green Berets, Red Line 7000, Ice Palace

1939 - Johnny Tillotson
singer: Poetry In Motion, It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin’, Without You, Talk Back Trembling Lips

1941 - Ryan O’Neal
actor: Love Story, Paper Moon, What’s Up Doc?, Peyton Place

1945 - Michael Brandon (Feldman)
actor: Lovers and Other Strangers, Red Alert, Rich and Famous, Promises in the Dark

1945 - Steve Spurrier
football: Univ. of Florida [Heisman Trophy winner: 1966], SF 49ers

1945 - Jimmy Winston (Langwith)
musician: organ: groups: Moments, Small Faces

1946 - Tom (Thomas George) Hutton
baseball: LA Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, Montreal Expos, Toronto Blue Jays

1947 - Brian Lavender
hockey: NHL: SL Blues, NY Islanders, Detroit Red Wings, California Seals

1947 - David Leland
actor: Time Bandits, Personal Services; director/writer: Wish You Were Here; director: Checking Out, The Big Man: Crossing the Line; writer: Mona Lisa, Personal Services, Running Wild

1948 - Craig Frost
musician: keyboard: group: Grand Funk Railroad: We’re an American Band, The Loco-Motion, Some Kind of Wonderful, Bad Time

1948 - Joe Bonner
jazz pianist, composer

1949 - Jessica (Phyllis) Lange
Academy Award-winning actress: Tootsie [1982], Blue Sky [1994]; Frances, King Kong, All That Jazz, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Sweet Dreams

1951 - Luther Vandross
singer, songwriter: Never Too Much, How Many Times Can We Say Goodbye; died July 1, 2005

1959 - Clint Howard
actor: Backdraft, Cocoon, Ice Cream Man, That Thing You Do!, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, How the Grinch Stole Christmas

1964 - Crispin Glover
actor: Dead Man, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Doors, Twister, Back to the Future, Friday the 13th, Part 4: The Final Chapter, My Tutor, Charlie's Angels [2000]

1976 - Joey Lawrence
actor: Gimme a Break, Blossom, Chains of Gold, Pulse, Wait Till Your Mother Gets Home, Radioland Murders.

Chart Toppers
April 20th.

1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
Peter Cottontail - Gene Autry
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 He’s Got the Whole World (In His Hands) - Laurie London
Book of Love - The Monotones
Don’t You Just Know It - Huey (Piano) Smith & The Clowns
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Daydream - The Lovin’ Spoonful
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) - MFSB featuring The Three Degrees
Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me - Gladys Knight & The Pips
The Loco-Motion - Grand Funk
A Very Special Love Song - Charlie Rich

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Chariots of Fire - Titles - Vangelis
The Clown - Conway Twitty

1990 I’ll Be Your Everything - Tommy Page
Don’t Wanna Fall in Love - Jane Child
Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinead O’Connor
Five Minutes - Lorrie Morgan


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-20-2007, 11:00 PM
111th day of 2007 - 254 remaining.

Saturday, April 21, 2007
KINDERGARTEN DAY. :D

Some things we take for granted, like kindergarten. It’s just the first chance most kids get to attend a formal school, right? Wrong.

A man named Friedrich Froebel actually invented kindergarten. Little Freddie was born on this day in 1782 in Germany. He grew up to become a teacher, author and toy maker.

Friedrich’s experience as an educator led him to the conclusion that playtime can be very instructive; an essential part of a child’s education. He founded the first kindergarten for this purpose in 1837 in Blankenburg, Germany.

This directed playtime led to his invention of a series of toys that were designed to stimulate learning. He called these toys, gifts. The mother of famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright gave her son some of these gifts ... in the form of maple wood blocks. Wright often spoke of the value the gifts had brought him throughout his life.

Nursery school and kindergarten as we know it are the direct results of the influence of Friedrich Froebel. The first public kindergarten in the U.S. was started by Conrad Poppenhusen in College Point, Queens, New York in 1870.

Now put your paper and paste away; it’s time to lie down on your mats.

Events
April 21st.


1856 - The first rail train to pass over the mighty Mississippi River between Davenport, Iowa and Rock Island, IL made its journey across a newly completed bridge between the two rail centers.

1895 - Woodville Latham demonstrated the first use of a moving picture projected on a screen in New York City.

1940 - The radio program, Take It or Leave It, was first heard on CBS radio on this day. Bob Hawk offered contestants a top prize of $64. No, there were no lovely parting gifts or consolation prizes that we could find. Losers just left.

1949 - The prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for Broadcasting was presented to You Bet Your Life star, “The one, the only, Groucho Marx.” This was the first time the honor had been awarded to a comedian.

1956 - Leonard Ross, age 10, became the youngest prizewinner on a big-time quiz program. The youngster won $100,000 on The Big Surprise for knowing about his specialty: stocks! Hope he invested that dough wisely.

1959 - 1959 - The largest fish ever hooked by a rod and reel was landed by Alf Dean. Ol’ Alf told the fellas down at the marina about the 16-foot, 10-inch white shark that weighed in at 2,664 pounds! Wowzers! What kind of line do you think he used? Electric power line, maybe? Dean made the historic catch in South Australia.

1963 - The Beatles and The Rolling Stones met for the first time together, at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, England. The Stones opened show.

1969 - Japanese marathon runner Yoshiaki Unetani won the Boston Marathon by finishing first in a record field of 1,152.

1970 - Sportscaster Curt Gowdy was the recipient of the coveted George Foster Peabody Award for achievement in radio and television. Curt, a long-time voice of the Boston Red Sox, NBC and ABC Sports and syndicated programs (including The American Sportsman), was the first sports broadcaster to receive the honor.

1976 - A Cadillac convertible, the ‘last’ American-made rag-top automobile, rolled off the assembly line at GM’s Cadillac production facility in Detroit, MI. This ended a tradition that began in 1916. The tradition didn’t stay ended, however. A few years later, Chrysler Corporation, under chairman Lee Iacocca, began production once again of soft-top cars. Then Ford brought back the convertible Mustang and GM got back in the picture with the convertible Pontiac Sunbird and a new, smaller Cadillac version. It seems that the convertible is just too popular to disappear from the American auto scene!

1977 - The Broadway musical, Annie, opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Andrea McArdle was a shining star in the title role. Annie continued on the Great White Way until January 2, 1983.

1980 - America’s oldest long-distance race, the Boston Marathon, was touched by scandal this day. Actually, the race was sullied, tarnished and disgraced when Rosie Ruiz, a 26-year-old office worker, stunned the sports world when she crossed the finish line in a record time of 2 hours, 31 minutes and 56 seconds. Later, after an investigation, she was stripped of the honor of winning the marathon when evidence showed that she had not run the entire race.

1984 - Michael Jackson’s Thriller album slipped a couple of notches from number 1 to number 3 on the pop album charts. Michael needn’t have been too upset. Thriller was number one for 37 weeks, setting a record in music history for the longest run at the top.

1984 - David Palmer pitched only the fourth shortened, perfect game in major-league baseball history. Palmer was pitching the Montreal Expos to a 4-0 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals when the home plate umpire called the game in five innings when the rains came. Palmer had made 57 pitches.

1986 - The once-notorious Lexington Hotel in Chicago received a visitor, in the person of Geraldo Rivera, along with a camera crew. A record audience watched as the long-sealed vault of racketeer, Al Capone was opened during a much-hyped TV special. Guess what? All that Geraldo found were broken bottles and no trace that Capone and his gang had ever stashed anything there.

Birthdays
April 21st.

1782 - Friedrich Froebel
teacher, author, toy maker: invented kindergarten; died June 21, 1852; see Kindergarten Day [above]

1816 - Charlotte Bronte
author: Jane Eyre, The Professor, Shirley, Villette; died Mar 31, 1855

1838 - John Muir
conservationist: influential in the establishment of the U.S. National Parks system and U.S. forest conservation; Muir Woods National Monument in California named after him; died Dec 24, 1914

1887 - Joe McCarthy
baseball manager: Chicago Cubs, NY Yankees, Boston Red Sox: holds record: highest winning percentage: [.615]; died Jan 13, 1978

1915 - Anthony Quinn
Academy Award-winning actor: Viva Zapata! [1952], Lust for Life [1956]; The Guns of Navarone, The Inheritance, The Old Man and the Sea, Zorba the Greek; died June 3, 2001

1919 - Don Cornell (Louis Varlaro)
singer: It isn’t Fair, I’ll Walk Alone, I’m Yours, Heart of My Heart, This is the Beginning of the End, Hold My Hand, The Bible Tells Me So, Most of All, Love is a Many-Splendored Thing; died Feb 23, 2004

1924 - Clara Ward
gospel singer: group: Clara Ward Gospel Troupe; died Jan 16, 1973

1926 - Queen Elizabeth II (Elisabeth Mary)
Queen of the United Kingdom [1952- ]; eldest daughter of George VI and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon; married Philip Mountbatten [1947]: four children: Charles [Prince of Wales], Anne, Andrew, Edward

1931 - Carl (Robert) Belew
country singer: Welcome Back to My World, songwriter: Am I That Easy to Forget?, Stop the World and Let Me Off, Lonely Street, What’s He Doing in My World?; died Oct 31, 1990

1932 - Elaine May
actress: California Suite; comedienne: half of a comedy duo with Mike Nichols; director: A New Leaf, The Heartbreak Kid, Ishtar, Mikey and Nicky

1935 - Charles Grodin
actor: Clifford, Beethoven I & II, Midnight Run, Dave; director, host: The Charles Grodin Show

1936 - Reg Fleming
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins, NY Rangers, Philadelphia Flyers, Buffalo Sabres

1939 - Ernie Maresca
entertainer: Shout! Shout! [Knock Yourself Out], songwriter: Runaround Sue, The Wanderer

1940 - Jacques Caron
hockey: NHL: LA Kings, SL Blues; coach: NJ Devils

1947 - Al (Alonza Benjamin) Bumbry (Bumbrey)
baseball: Baltimore Orioles (Rookie of the Year: 1973/World Series: 1979, 1983/all-star: 1980), SD Padres

1947 - Iggy Pop (James Newell Osterburg)
singer, songwriter: group: Psychedelic Stooges: LP: The Stooges

1947 - John Weider
musician: bass: group: Family: No Mule’s Fool, Weaver’s Answer, In My Own Time, Burlesque, LPs: Fearless, Bandstand

1949 - Patti LuPone
actress: Evita, Song Spinner, Driving Miss Daisy, Wise Guys, 1941, Life Goes On

1951 - Paul Carrack
musician: piano, singer, songwriter: groups: Noise to Go, Mike and the Mechanics, Ace: How Long; Squeeze: Goodbye Girl, Up the Junction, Cool for Cats; solo: LPs: Paul Carrack, Suburban Voodoo

1951 - Tony Danza
actor: Family Law, Who’s the Boss, Taxi, Angels in the Outfield, Baby Talk; TV talk show host: The Tony Danza Show [co-executive producer]

1958 - Andie (Rosalie Anderson) MacDowell
actress: Multiplicity, Unstrung Heroes, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Short Cuts, Groundhog Day, Green Card, sex lies and videotape, St. Elmo’s Fire, The Player, Greystroke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes

1959 - Robert Smith
musician: guitar, singer, songwriter: group: The Cure: A Forest, Charlotte Sometimes, Let’s Go to Bed, Love Cats, The Caterpillar, Inbetween Days.

Chart Toppers
April 21st.


1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill - Les Paul & Mary Ford
Would I Love You - Patti Page
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
I Need Your Love Tonight - Elvis Presley
(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I - Elvis Presley
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
This is My Song - Petula Clark
A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You - The Monkees
Lonely Again - Eddy Arnold

1975 Philadelphia Freedom - The Elton John Band
(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song
- B.J. Thomas
He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) - Tony Orlando & Dawn
Always Wanting You - Merle Haggard

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Come on Eileen - Dexys Midnight Runners
Mr. Roboto - Styx
Dixieland Delight - Alabama

1991 You’re in Love - Wilson Phillips
Baby Baby - Amy Grant
Joyride - Roxette
Down Home - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-21-2007, 11:00 PM
112th day of 2007 - 253 remaining.

Sunday, April 22, 2007
EGG ROLL DAY. :D

On this day in 1878, the first Egg Roll was held on the grounds of the White House in Washington, DC. The first president on hand for the first Egg Roll was Rutherford B. Hayes. He and his wife Lucy made it an official event. It has been held every year since, except during the war years of WWI and WWII through 1953. The president who brought the tradition back in 1953 was Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In truth, there had been egg rolls in Washington, D.C. as far back as the mid-1860s, but they had been held on the rolling green hills of the Capitol Building. Since the grounds of the Capitol were looking pretty shabby after the 1876 Easter event, the U.S. Congress passed a law preventing the lawns at the Capitol from being used for any children’s activities ... including egg hunting and rolling. Rain washed out the first opportunity for a White House egg roll in 1877. But, President Hayes came to the children’s rescue for the next year’s Easter Monday.

Today, the Egg Roll is still held the day after Easter on the South Lawn of the White House, hosted by the President of the United States and the First Lady. The Vice President and his wife also attend the event as do other noted celebrities, including the official White House Easter Bunny. The Egg Roll usually follows a traditional Easter Egg Hunt on the grounds, as well. Roll on!

Events
April 22nd.

1793 - Philadelphia played host to the first circus attended by George Washington. It would be years before Congress provided a two-ring circus of its own for the President!

1864 - The U.S. Congress mandated that all coins minted as U.S. currency bear the inscription “In God We Trust.”

1876 - An eight-team National League began its inaugural season on this day in 1876. A crowd of 3,000 watched as Boston defeated Philadelphia 6-5. The opening season consisted of 70 games -- a lot less than the 162 game season (barring strikes) played today -- and no playoffs! These are the cities that were home to the original eight National League teams: Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Hartford, Louisville, New York, Philadelphia and St. Louis. Today, Boston is in the American League, Hartford and Louisville don’t have teams in either league, and Atlanta, Montreal, Houston, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, Colorado and Florida join the rest of the original teams as members of baseball’s National League.

1889 - Land Ho! At noon, the sound of a gun shot was the only signal needed for thousands of settlers to rush into the Oklahoma territory to claim their pieces of land. The U.S. Federal government had purchased almost two million acres of land in Central Oklahoma from the Crete and Seminole Indians and opened it up on this day to the settlers to claim their stakes. The purchase was made under pressure of cattle ranchers who needed more land for grazing.

1914 - Babe Ruth, playing for the Baltimore Orioles, made his pitching debut in pro ball. He shut out the Buffalo Bisons, 6-0.

1931 - A contraption known as the autogyro landed on the lawn of the White House. Before the Secret Service could come out with guns blazing, President Herbert Hoover shook hands with pilot, James G. Ray, and gave him a trophy! Don’t try this today.

1940 - The first all-Chinese commercial radio program was broadcast over KSAN radio in San Francisco, CA. Later, KSAN would become a pioneer in playing ‘underground rock’ music which, to many, must have sounded like Chinese, too...

1946 - Tex McCrary and Jinx Falkenburg arrived at WEAF radio in New York City with an entertaining morning show called, Hi, Jinx. WEAF later became WNBC and then WFAN SportsRadio 66.

1956 - Elvis Presley made his Las Vegas debut on this night at the Frontier Hotel. With Heartbreak Hotel at the top of the pop charts, one can imagine the excitement generated by the new ‘King of rock and roll’. Even with a number one hit, Elvis was not yet well-received by the middle-aged audience. Management of the Frontier was so unimpressed, they gave Elvis his walking papers after one week of a two-week engagement.

1959 - The Chicago White Sox took ‘batting practice’ against the Kansas City Athletics, 20-6. Chicago scored 11 runs in the seventh inning with only one hit, a single by Johnny Callison. The Sox got 10 walks and one hit batted. Not to be outdone in the effort, the Athletics contributed three errors.

1962 - The Toronto Maple Leafs won back the Stanley Cup after 11 years. The National Hockey League champions kept Lord Stanley’s cup locked up in Toronto for the next three seasons.

1967 - Randy Matson set a world outdoor record in the shot put with a toss of 71 feet, 5-1/2 inches in College Station, Texas. The shot landed in section E-83 of the grandstand, but fortunately, no one was hurt.

1970 - Tom Seaver of the New York Mets struck out 19 batters to tie a National League baseball record. He also set a record by striking out 10 batters consecutively as the ‘Amazing’ Mets defeated the San Diego Padres at Shea Stadium.

1970 - H. Ross Perot, a future candidate for the U.S. Presidency, did not have a good day. Perot, of Dallas, TX, reportedly lost $450 million in the stock market. As some people say, “Some days you win some. Some days you lose some.”

1970 - The first Earth Day was observed -- with the purpose of reclaiming the purity of the air we breathe, the water we drink and the environment we live in. With the slogan “Give Earth a Chance,” Earth Day continues to be celebrated on this anniversary or on the vernal equinox.

1974 - Redbone won a gold record for the single, Come and Get Your Love. The group, playing American Indian ‘swamp rock’, formed in Los Angeles in 1968. Lolly and Pat Vegas, brothers, had been session musicians and worked on the Shindig TV show. Anthony Bellamy and Peter De Poe were also members of the group. Redbone had one other hit, The Witch Queen of New Orleans. The top five hit, Come and Get Your Love, was the group’s second and final chart success.

1985 - Washington and Lee University researchers reported this day that Martha Washington had 29,650 pounds when she and George were married. Now, before you smart alecks start making cracks about the ‘Father of Our Country’ liking cuddly women, we’d like you to know that 29,650 pounds was worth $5.9 million on their wedding day.

Birthdays
April 22nd.

1707 - Henry Fielding
author: The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling; died Oct 8, 1754

1724 - Immanuel Kant
philosopher: The Critique of Pure Reason; died Feb 12, 1804

1870 - Nikolai Lenin (Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov)
Russian premier [1917-1924]; died Jan 21, 1924

1904 - J. (Julius) Robert Oppenheimer
physicist: Enrico Fermi Award for work in nuclear physics: designed & built 1st atomic bomb; died Feb 18, 1967

1906 - Eddie Albert (Edward Albert Heimberger)
actor: Green Acres, Teahouse of the August Moon, Roman Holiday; died May 26, 2005

1916 - Yehudi Menuhin
violinist: child prodigy: solo with San Francisco Orchestra at age of 7, played with New York Symphony Orchestra at ten; died Mar 12, 1999

1918 - Mickey (James Barton) Vernon
baseball: Washington Nationals [all-star: 1946, 1948, 1953, 1954, 1955], Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1958], Boston Red Sox [all-star: 1956], Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates

1920 - Hal March (Mendelson)
TV emcee: What’s It For, The $64,000 Question, Laughs for Sale; actor: My Friend Irma, The Soldiers, The Imogene Coca Show, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; died Jan 19, 1970

1921 - Candido Camero
musician: bongos, congas, tres, bass: performed/recorded w/George Shearing, Stan Kenton, Dizzy Gillespie, Dinah Washington, Tito Puente, Machito

1922 - Richard Diebenkorn
artist: Touched Red, Ochre, Flotsam, Green; died Mar 30, 1993

1922 - Charles Mingus
musician: bassist, piano; singer, bandleader, composer: 20th century black music; died Jan 5, 1979

1923 - Aaron Spelling
Emmy Award-winning executive producer: Day One, AT&T Presents [1988-1989], And the Band Played On [1993-1994]; Charlie’s Angels, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place; died June 23, 2006

1933 - Mark Damon (Alan Harris)
actor: Black Sabbath, Between Heaven and Hell, The Fall of the House of Usher

1936 - Glen Campbell
Grammy Award-winning singer: By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Gentle on My Mind, CMA Entertainer of the Year [1968]; Galveston, Wichita Lineman, Southern Nights, Rhinestone Cowboy; TV host: The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour; actor: True Grit, Norwood, Strange Homecoming

1937 - (John Joseph) Jack Nicholson
Academy Award-winning actor: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975], Terms of Endearment [1983], As Good as It Gets [1997]; Five Easy Pieces, The Shining, Batman, Broadcast News, Chinatown, Easy Rider, Prizzi’s Honor, The Witches of Eastwicke, Little Shop of Horrors, A Few Good Men

1938 - Deane Beman
golf: champ: U.S. Amateur twice and British Amateur once; first commissioner of PGA Tour [1974-1994]; created stadium golf

1939 - Mel Carter
singer: Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me; actor: Quincy, Sanford and Son, Marcus Welby, M.D., Magnum P.I.

1939 - Jason Miller
Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning playwright: That Championship Season [1973]; actor: Mommy, Murdered Innocence, Small Kill, Light of Day, Toy Soldiers, Monsignor, The Exorcist series, The Ninth Configuration; died May 13, 2001

1949 - Spencer Haywood
basketball: U.S. Olympic team [gold medal: 1968], University of Detroit [1st player to leave college early for the pros], Denver Rockets [ABA Most Valuable Player/Rookie of the Year: 1970], LA Lakers

1950 - Peter Frampton
guitarist, singer: Show Me the Way, Do You Feel Like We Do, I Can’t Stand it No More

1953 - Tom Lysiak
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Chicago Blackhawks

1954 - Joseph Bottoms
actor: The Black Hole, Holocaust, Liar’s Edge, Treacherous Crossing, Surfacing, The Dove, Inner Sanctum

1961 - Byron Allen
comedian, TV host: Entertainers, Byron Allen Show, Real People, Jammin’; producer, writer, actor: Case Closed

1964 - Chris Makepeace
actor: My Bodyguard, Vamp, Undergrads, Last Chase, Aloha Summer, The Terry Fox Story, Captive Hearts.

Chart Toppers
April 22nd.

1944 It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
I Love You - Bing Crosby
Poinciana - Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Be My Life’s Companion - The Mills Brothers
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Greenfields - The Brothers Four
Sweet Nothin’s - Brenda Lee
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Cry like a Baby - The Box Tops
Lady Madonna - The Beatles
Fist City - Loretta Lynn

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
Drinkin’ My Baby (Off My Mind) - Eddie Rabbitt

1984 Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now - The Thompson Twins
The Yellow Rose - Johnny Lee with Lane Brody


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-23-2007, 08:35 AM
113th day of 2007 - 252 remaining.

Monday, April 23, 2007
SLAY A DRAGON DAY.

In Greek mythology, Perseus slew a monster that threatened Andromeda. Not to be outdone, the Crusaders from the 1300s told the story of Saint George. George used his magic sword to kill a dragon ... just in the nick of time to save the king’s daughter from being sacrificed to the fire-breathing beast. As the story goes, this dragon had an insatiable appetite and it was only through his deep faith that George was able to accomplish this deed.

Little factual information is known about Saint George other than his becoming a soldier and rising to a high rank under Diocletian. Because of his strong and open belief in Christianity, he was arrested, tortured and put to death at Nicomedia on this day in 303 A.D.

He was so revered by the Crusaders, that George was named Patron Saint of England in 1350 A.D. For many years, English soldiers wore the red cross of St. George on a white background as a badge; and it remains a part of the British Union flag.

The martyred hero is still honored throughout England on this day, Saint George Feast Day.

Events
April 23rd.


1772 - Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle wrote one of the world’s most familiar -- and beautiful -- national anthems. La Marseillaise is still proudly sung by the French citizenry today.

1789 - Courier De Boston was published for the first time in, of course, Boston, MA. It was the first Roman Catholic magazine in the United States.

1872 - Charlotte E. Ray became the first black woman lawyer -- in ceremonies held in Washington, DC.

1900 - The word, hillbilly, was first used in print in an article in the New York Journal. It was spelled a little differently, as the story said that a Hill-Billie was a “free and untrammelled white citizen of Alabama, who lives in the hills.” The article continued that “he has no means to speak of, dresses as he can, talks as he pleases, drinks whiskey when he gets it and fires off his revolver as the fancy takes him.”

1921 - Charles Paddock set a record time in the 300-meter track event by posting a time of 33.2 seconds. There is a zoo named after Paddock in Atascadero, CA. The cheetah at the zoo is probably the only animal that can run faster than Paddock did.

1948 - Johnny Longden became the first race jockey to ride 3,000 career winners as he set the mark at Bay Meadows in San Mateo, CA.

1951 - The Associated Press began use of its new Teletypesetter circuit. The AP provided a perforated, paper-tape message to a news bureau in Charlotte, North Carolina. The message was then fed to a monitor for preparation into a printer. From there, the newspaper copy was completed.

1954 - Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves hit his first major-league home run on this day.

1963 - Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds got his first hit in the major leagues. It was a booming triple off the Pirates’ Bob Friend. ‘Charlie Hustle’ went on to break Ty Cobb’s all-time hitting record more than 20 years later, playing for the Reds, the Phillies and the Expos.

1964 - Ken Johnson of the Houston Colts will certainly never forget this day. Johnson tossed the first no-hit game -- for a loss -- in baseball history. Cincinnati’s Reds beat Johnson’s no hitter by a score of 1-0. The Reds capitalized on two costly Houston errors. We wonder what Johnson had to say in the locker room...

1985 - This was a big day for the flamboyant Liberace. Lee, as he was called by those close to him, first appeared on the TV soap opera, Another World. The sequined and well-furred pianist appeared as a fan of Felicia Gallant, a romance novelist. Later in the day, Liberace was a guest video jockey on MTV!

1985 - The Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta, GA, made a showy, glitzy announcement that it was changing its 99-year-old secret formula. New Coke was called “the most significant soft drink development” in the company’s history. Yeah, well, so much for history. Fans of the original Coke were instrumental in bringing Classic Coke back. The way they did it was, actually, quite ingenious. They didn’t buy the new Coke and it turned out to be one of the biggest corporate flops ever.

1985 - The first musical to win a Pulitzer Prize in over a decade was Sunday in the Park with George. Also on this day, Studs Terkel earned his first Pulitzer for The Good War: An Oral History of World War II.

1987 - Business Week magazine announced its list of the highest paid executives in the U.S. Lee Iacocca of Chrysler Corporation topped the list, followed by Paul Fireman of Reebok International.

Birthdays
April 23rd.

1564 - William Shakespeare
poet, playwright: Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, MacBeth and at least three dozen more plays and over 150 sonnets; died Apr 23, 1616

1791 - James Buchanan
15th U.S. President [1857-1861]; never married; nickname: Old Buck [died June 1, 1868]

1813 - Stephen Douglas
Illinois politician who beat Abraham Lincoln for a seat in the state legislature; died June 3, 1861

1891 - Sergei Prokofiev
pianist, composer: Peter and the Wolf; opera: The Love for Three Oranges, The Fiery Angel, War and Peace; ballet: Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella; film scores: Alexander Nevsky, Ivan the Terrible, Lieutenant Kije; symphonies: Classical Symphony, The Fifth Symphony; Piano Concertos Nos. 1-5; died Mar 5, 1953

1916 - (Charles Burnham) Bud Wilkinson
football: Minnesota Golden Gophers: on national championship teams [1934-1936]; coach: Oklahoma Sooners [1947-1963]: 145-29-4 record, 3 national titles [1950, 1955, 1956], won 47 consecutive games [1953–1957: longest winning streak in modern football]; St. Louis Cardinals [1978-1879]; died Feb 9, 1994

1921 - Janet Blair (Martha Jane Lafferty)
actress: My Sister Eileen, The Fabulous Dorseys, The Fuller Brush Man, Black Arrow, Boy’s Night Out, Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood; died Feb 19, 2007

1928 - Shirley (Jane) Temple Black
child actress: Little Miss Marker, Curly Top, Heidi, The Little Colonel, Poor Little Rich Girl, Wee Willie Winkie, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm; U.S. delegate to the United Nations and chief of protocol

1930 - Alan Oppenheimer
actor: Murphy Brown, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Legend of Prince Valiant, Home Free, Eischied, Big Eddie, Trancers 4 and 5, Child of Darkness, Child of Light, The Bionic Woman, The Groundstar Conspiracy, Star!

1932 - (Roy) Halston (Frowick)
fashion designer: created famous pillbox hat [1962] worn by Jackie Kennedy at JFK's inaugural; his designs set standard for American designers in 1970s

1936 - Roy Orbison
singer: Only the Lonely, Running Scared, Oh, Pretty Woman, Crying, Dream Baby, It’s Over; died Dec 6, 1988

1937 - Don Massengale
golf: champ: PGA: Bing Crosby Celebrity Pro-Am [1966], Canadian Open [1966]; Senior PGA: Greater Grand Rapids Open [1990], Royal Caribbean Classic [1992]; National Club Professional [1972]

1939 - David Birney
actor: Oh, God! Book 2, Nightfall, Serpico [TV], St. Elsewhere, Great American TV Poll, Bridget Loves Bernie, Live Shot

1939 - Lee Majors (Harvey Lee Yeary II)
actor: The Six Million Dollar Man, Big Valley, The Bionic Woman, The Covergirl Murders

1939 - Ray Peterson
singer: Tell Laura I Love Her, Corinna, Corinna, The Wonder of You; owner of Dunes record label; sang in film One Way Wahini: Wahine Does the Bird; died Jan 25, 2005

1942 - Sandra Dee (Alexandra Zuck)
actress: A Summer Place, Gidget, Tammy and the Doctor; died Feb 20, 2005

1943 - Tony (Anthony James) Esposito
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks [Calder Memorial Trophy: NHL’s outstanding rookie: 1969-1970/all-star: 1970, 1972, 1980/shared Vezina Trophy for best goaltender [1972, 1974]; played 886 games in NHL, winning 423, losing 307, earning draw in 151; 76 shutouts with a 2.92 goals-against-average; in 99 playoff games, Tony won 45, lost 53 with a 3.07 average; shared goaltending duties with Ken Dryden in 1972 when Team Canada played the Soviet Nationals in famed Series of the Century [Canada edged Soviets, four games to three w/one tied]; brother of Hockey Hall of Famer, Phil Esposito

1943 - Hervé Villechaize
actor: Fantasy Island, The Man with the Golden Gun, Rumpelstiltskin, Two Moon Junction; died Sep 4, 1993

1944 - Marty Fleckman
golf: Univ. of Houston: [3 NCAA championship teams/individual title: 1965: two-day total of 135/All-American: 1965/medalist honors at Western Amateur: 1966/Walker Cup team: 1967]; pro: Cajun Classic champ: 1967; golf teacher: Meyer Park Golf Course, Houston

1947 - Bernadette Devlin (McAliskey)
Irish civil rights leader

1949 - Joyce DeWitt
actress: Three’s Company

1952 - Narada Michael Walden
musician: drums: groups: Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, w/Jeff Beck on LP Wired; singer: solo LPs: Garden of Love Light, Divine Emotion; record producer: Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Starship; songwriter: Jump to the Beat

1957 - Jan Hooks
actress: Designing Women, Saturday Night Live, The Martin Short Show, The 1/2 Hour Comedy Hour, A Dangerous Woman, Coneheads, Batman Returns, Pee Wee’s Big Adventure

1960 - Valerie (Anne) Bertinelli
actress: One Day at a Time, Silent Witness, Ordinary Heroes, Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp

1960 - Steve Clark
musician: guitar: group: Def Leppard: Photograph, Rock of Ages, Foolin’, LPs: On Through the Night, High’n’Dry, Pyromania, Hysteria; died Jan 8, 1991.

Chart Toppers
April 23rd.

1945 Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra
(vocal: Kitty Kallen)
My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 Doggie in the Window - Patti Page
Pretend - Nat King Cole
I Believe - Frankie Laine
Your Cheatin’ Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Blue Moon - The Marcels
Runaway - Del Shannon
Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
You’ve Made Me So Very Happy - Blood, Sweat & Tears
It’s Your Thing - The Isley Brothers
Galveston - Glen Campbell

1977 Don’t Leave Me This Way - Thelma Houston
Southern Nights - Glen Campbell
Hotel California - Eagles
She’s Got You - Loretta Lynn

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Nightshift - Commodores
I Need More of You - Bellamy Brothers


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-23-2007, 11:00 PM
114th day of 2007 - 251 remaining.

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
PIPELESS ORGAN DAY.

It was on this date in Chicago, IL that Laurens Hammond announced news that would be favored by many churches across the United States. The news was the development of the pipeless organ -- and a granting of a U.S. patent for same. The year was 1934.

Hammond, a decades-old name in keyboard organs in churches, theaters, auditoriums and homes, is the same Hammond who fostered many of the developments that would make electronic keyboards so popular in modern music. The Hammond B-3 and B-5 organs, for example, became mainstays for many recording artists, while inventions in Hammond organ loud speaker development (the Hammond Leslie Tremelo speaker) produced still other important milestones that allowed small organs to emulate the big concert theater console organs.

Later, solid-state circuitry and computers allowed keyboards the flexibility to sound like other instruments, permitting the organist to play many instruments from the organ’s multiple keyboards.

And you thought there was an entire orchestra hiding in the closet ...

Events
April 24th.

1901 - Four games were scheduled to open the brand new American League baseball season. Three of them, however, were rained out. The Chicago White Stockings beat the Cleveland Blues 8-2 before a paid crowd of over 10,000 fans in the only game played. The new league, nicknamed the junior circuit, was made up of teams in Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. Buffalo, Indianapolis and, initially, Minneapolis, fell out of the league, with new teams in Boston, New York, Baltimore, Washington D.C. and, later, Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle, Ft. Worth and Toronto joining the American League.

1936 - Benny Goodman and his trio recorded China Boy for Victor Records. Gene Krupa, Teddy Wilson and Goodman recorded the session in Chicago.

1945 - A new commissioner of baseball was named. He was Albert B. ‘Happy’ Chandler.

1949 - Dick Powell starred in Richard Diamond, Private Detective on NBC radio. The show stayed on the air for four years. Later, it would have a three-year run on TV starring David Janssen in the title role.

1952 - Raymond Burr made his TV acting debut on the Gruen Guild Playhouse in an episode titled, The Tiger. Not long after this start, Burr would be seen in the hugely popular Perry Mason and much later in Ironside.

1954 - Billboard magazine, the music industry trade publication, headlined a change to come about in the music biz. The headline read, “Teenagers Demand Music with a Beat -- Spur Rhythm and Blues” ... a sign of times to come. Within a year, R&B music by both black and white artists caught the public’s fancy.

1955 - X-Minus One, a show for science fiction fans, was first heard on NBC radio this day.

1959 - Your Hit Parade ended after a nine-year run on television and many more years on radio. The show debuted in 1935. On the final show, these were the top five songs on Your Hit Parade:
1 - Come Softly to Me
2 - Pink Shoelaces
3 - Never Be Anyone Else but You
4 - It’s Just a Matter of Time
5 - I Need Your Love Tonight

1961 - Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers struck out 18 batters in a game this day, becoming the first major-league pitcher to do so on two different occasions.

1963 - Bob Cousy of the Boston Celtics retired from the NBA. Mr. Basketball’ wouldn’t give up the game, however, as he went on to coach Boston College to a record 117 wins and 38 losses.

1965 - Game of Love, by Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders, made it to the top spot on the Billboard music chart. Game of Love stayed for a short visit of one week, before Peter Noone and Herman’s Hermits took over the top spot with Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter.

1969 - The singing family, The Cowsills, received a gold record for their hit single, Hair, from the Broadway show of the same name.

1985 - There were a reported 832,602 millionaires in the United States on this day, according to researchers. The average millionaire was 57 years old. A majority (85 percent) held college degrees. 20 percent were retired and 70 percent were self-employed.

Birthdays
April 24th.

1743 - Edmund Cartwright
inventor: power loom; died Oct 30, 1823

1766 - Robert Bailey Thomas
founder, editor: The Farmer’s Almanac; died May 19, 1846

1836 - George Bascom
West Point officer who arrested Chief Cochise, who escaped and began the Apache Wars reign of terror

1904 - Willem de Kooning
painter/expressionist; died Mar 19, 1997

1905 - Robert Penn Warren
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: All the King’s Men [1947], poet: Promises:Poems, 1954-1956 [1958], Now and Then:Poems, 1976-1978 [1979]; 1st official poet laureate of U.S.; died Sep 15, 1989

1911 - Jack E. Leonard (Leonard Lebitsky)
comedian, actor: The Disorderly Orderly, Three Sailors and a Girl, Journey Back to Oz; died May 9, 1973

1916 - Stanley Kauffmann
theatre critic: The New Republic: Stanley Kauffmann on Films; writer: Distinguishing Features : Film Criticism and Comment, Persons of the Drama : Theater Criticism and Comment; film/theater teacher: Yale School of Drama, CUNY Graduate Center, Adelphi University, Hunter College; author: Notes from a Dark Street

1922 - (Samuel) Aaron Bell
jazz musician: bass: played w/Duke Ellington, Stan Kenton, Andy Kirk, Lucky Millinder, Teddy Wilson, Lester Young; composer, teacher; died July 28, 2003

1923 - Freddie Scott
singer: Hey Girl, Are You Lonely for Me

1928 - Johnny Griffin
jazz musician: tenor sax: Chicago Riffin’, Flying Home, Soft and Furry, Honeybucket

1934 - Shirley (Lee Foley) Boone
singer: married to singer Pat Boone since 1953; daughter of singer, Red Foley; group: The Boones [w/Pat and daughters Cherry, Linda Lee, Debby and Laura Gene]

1934 - Shirley MacLaine (Shirley MacLean Beaty)
Academy Award-winning actress: Terms of Endearment [1983]; Emmy awards: Shirley MacLaine: If They Could See Me Now [1974], Gypsy in My Soul [1976], Shirley MacLaine... Every Little Movement [1980]; Irma La Douce, The Turning Point; sister of actor Warren Beatty

1936 - Jill Ireland
actress: Assassination, Death Wish 2, Hard Times; author: Life Wish; activist: support of breast cancer victims; wife of actor Charles Bronson; died May 18, 1990

1937 - Joe Henderson
composer/musician: tenor sax: played in sextet at San Francisco’s Keystone Korner; also played with Blood Sweat and Tears; died June 30, 2001

1942 - Barbra (Joan) Streisand
Grammy Award-winning Best Female Pop Vocalist [1963-1965, 1977, 1986], Best Songwriter [1977]; People, The Way We Were, You Don’t Bring Me Flowers; Academy Award-winning Best Song [1976: shared w/Paul Williams]: Evergreen [Love Theme from A Star Is Born]; Academy Award-winning Best Actress: Funny Girl [1968]; I Can Get It for You Wholesale, The Owl and the Pussycat, Hello Dolly, Funny Lady, The Way We Were, Yentl; actress/director: Yentl, The Prince of Tides, The Mirror Has Two Faces

1943 - Richard Sterban
musician: bass, singer: group: The Oak Ridge Boys: Talk About the Good Times, Where the Soul Never Dies, Cryin’ Again, American Made, Love Song, I Guess It Never Hurts to Cry Sometimes, Everyday, Make My Life with You, Little Things, Touch a Hand Make a Friend

1944 - Bill Singer
‘The Singer Throwing Machine’: baseball: pitcher: LA Dodgers [all-star: 1969], California Angels [all-star: 1973], Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, Toronto Blue Jays

1945 - Doug Clifford
drummer: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Up Around the Bend

1945 - Bob Lunn
golf: six PGA Tour victories [no majors], par-3 contest champ [1969 Masters]

1947 - Glenn Cornick
musician: bass: groups: Wild Turkey: LPs: Battle Hymn, Turkey, Jethro Tull: Living in the Past, Sweet Dream, Witch’s Promise

1949 - Bob Chandler
football: Oakland Raiders wide receiver: Super Bowl XV

1953 - Eric Bogosian
actor: Under Siege 2: Dark Territory, Witch Hunt, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial, Special Effects; actor, playwright: Talk Radio, Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll: Eric Bogosian

1954 - Vince Ferragamo
football: QB: Univ. of California, LA Rams: Super Bowl XIV

1954 - Captain Sensible (Raymond Burns)
musician: bass, singer: Happy Talk, Wot, A Nice Cup of Tea, Brenda, Glad It’s All Over, Relax; group: The Damned: Neat Neat Neat, New Rose

1955 - Michael O’Keefe
actor: Three Wishes, Ironweed, The Great Santini, Caddyshack, Gray Lady Down, Mass Appeal, Roseanne, Middle Ages, Against the Law

1963 - Billy Gould
musician: bass: group: Faith No More: Epic

1964 - Paul Ryder
musician: bass: group: Happy Mondays: Step On, Kinky Afro

1977 - Eric Balfour
actor: Arresting Behavior, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, What Women Want.

Chart Toppers
April 24th.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Day by Day - Frank Sinatra
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Here - Tony Martin
The Man with the Banjo - The Ames Brothers
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Mashed Potato Time - Dee Dee Sharp
Young World - Rick Nelson
Charlie’s Shoes - Billy Walker

1970 Let It Be - The Beatles
ABC - The Jackson 5
Spirit in the Sky - Norman Greenbaum
Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone - Charley Pride

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
If I Can’t Have You - Yvonne Elliman
Can’t Smile Without You - Barry Manilow
Every Time Two Fools Collide - Kenny Rogers & Dottie West

1986 Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Manic Monday - Bangles
Addicted to Love - Robert Palmer
Cajun Moon - Ricky Skaggs


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-24-2007, 11:00 PM
115th day of 2007 - 250 remaining.

Wednesday, April 25, 2007
WE’RE ON THE MAP DAY.

When you are taking a trip and following a map, you take the word of the cartographer that the map names are accurate. Things were pretty much the same on this day in 1507. That’s when mapmaker and geographer Martin Waldseemuller of Germany explained why the world map he was making would show the new world as ‘Amerige’ (the land of Amerigo).

In his book, Cosmographiae Introductio, he wrote, “Inasmuch as both Europe and Asia received their names from women, I see no reason why any one should justly object to calling this part Amerige, i.e., the land of Amerigo, or America, after Amerigo, its discoverer, a man of great ability.”

And so, Waldseemuller printed one thousand maps with Amerige printed on the part of the world we now call South America. He was obviously talking about the explorations of Amerigo Vespucci; not learning of Columbus’ discovery until several years later (news traveled quite slowly in those days); and he, obviously, never had any discussions with the Incas. They might have had a few different suggestions as to what to call the land where they lived.

However, it wasn’t long before ‘America’ was applied to both the North and South American continents ... and, as you may have noted, America is still a part of our maps and our geography lessons. Because the name, America, stuck, some refer to Waldseemuller as the godfather of America.

That’s all there is to it. Make a map, proclaim your little corner of the world as Podunck Gulch or whatever, print ’em up, distribute them and you’ll leave your mark on history. Here we are over four hundred years later still trying to understand why America is called America by the entire world, and the only explanation is that it was on the map and still is.

Events
April 25th.

1831 - The New York and Harlem Railway was incorporated in New York City.

1928 - Buddy, the first seeing eye dog, was presented to Morris S. Frank on this day. Many seeing eye organizations and schools continue to offer specially trained dogs “...to enhance the independence, dignity, and self-confidence of blind people...”

1938 - Your Family and Mine, a radio serial, was first broadcast.

1940 - W2XBS (now WCBS-TV) in New York City presented the first circus on TV. No, it wasn’t a political debate or a daytime tabloid talk show. It was a three-hour special broadcast from Madison Square Garden.

1943 - Rufus Gentry, playing for Buffalo in the International Baseball League, tied a record originally set in 1916 by winning an 11-inning, no-hitter. Buffalo defeated Newark 1-0.

1946 - The popular Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra recorded Cement Mixer for Majestic records, tapes and CDs this day. Well, not tapes and CDs. We were still listening to 78s back then ... thick, heavy ones, at that.

1953 - NBC-TV presented Ethel and Albert, the video version of the popular radio show. Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce starred in the program.

1954 - The prototype manufacture of a new solar battery was announced by the Bell Laboratories in New York City.

1959 - The St. Lawrence Seaway opened to traffic, saving shippers millions of dollars. By going from the sea to the Great Lakes across upstate New York, folks no longer had to ship goods the long, costly over land.

1967 - Colorado Governor John Love signed the first law legalizing abortion in the United States. The law was limited to therapeutic abortions when agreed to, unanimously, by a panel of three physicians.

1970 - DJs around the U.S. played the new number one song, ABC, quite often, as The Jackson 5 reached the number one spot in pop music for two weeks. ABC was the second of four number one songs in a row for the group from Gary, IN. I Want You Back was their first. ABC was one of 23 hits for Michael, Tito, Jackie, Jermaine and Marlon. ABC was knocked out of first place by The Guess Who and their hit, American Woman. I’m Casey Kasem. And the countdown continues...

1972 - Bill Sharman, ending his first year as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, was named Coach of the Year in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Sharman had a first year record of 69 wins and 13 losses.

1973 - The group, The Sweet, received a gold record for the hit Little Willy. The English rocker band recorded four hits in addition to their first million-seller, Ballroom Blitz, Fox on the Run, Action and Love is like Oxygen. Little Willy was a top-three hit, while the group’s other gold record winner, Fox on the Run made it to the top five.

1985 - Big River (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) opened at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre on Broadway in New York City. The Tony Award-winning score for the show was written by Roger Miller (his first Broadway production). The show, about life on the Mississippi, with Daniel Jenkins in the starring role of Huck Finn, ran for 1,005 performances and won the Tony for Best Musical of the Year. Big River picked up several more Tony Awards: Featured Actor in a Musical to Ron Richardson; Best Director (Musical) to Des McAnuff; Best Book (Musical) to William Hauptman; and Best Scenic Designer and Lighting Designer to Heidi Landesman and Richard Riddell respectively.

1999 - More than 70,000 mourners gathered in Littleton, Colorado to honor the victims of the Columbine High School massacre five days earlier. “All of us must change our lives to honor these children,” Vice President Al Gore told the crowd a few blocks from the high school. “More than ever, I realize every one of us is responsible for all of the children.”

Birthdays
April 25th.

1874 - Guglielmo Marconi
‘Father of Radio’: inventor: 1909 Nobel Laureate in Physics: wireless telegraphy [the transmission of Morse Code over electromagnetic energy]; died July 19, 1937

1906 - William J. Brennan Jr.
Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court: authored more than 1,200 opinions, including many landmarks: free press [New York Times v. Sullivan], women’s rights [Frontiero v. Richardson], reapportionment [Baker v. Carr], civil rights [Cooper v. Aaron, Green v. County School Board]; died July 24, 1997

1908 - Edward R. (Roscoe) Murrow
newsman: You are There, Person to Person; former head U.S. Information Agency; died Apr 27, 1965

1913 - Earl Bostic
alto sax player, bandleader: Flamingo, Sleep, You Go to My Head, Cherokee, Temptation; died Oct 28, 1965

1915 - Sal Franzella
jazz musician: alto sax, clarinet: group: Sal Franzella & the Accordionaires: Yesterdays, Oh Marie, Paradise

1916 - Jerry Barber
golfer: PGA Champion [1961: Barber & Don January tied at 277, Barber won playoff 67 to 68]; died Sep 9, 1994

1917 - Ella Fitzgerald
Grammy Award-winning singer [12]: Bill Bailey Won’t You Please Come Home, Mack the Knife, A-Tisket, A-Tasket; died June 15, 1996

1921 - Melissa Hayden (Mildred Herman)
ballerina: New York City Ballet

1923 - Albert King (Nelson)
blues singer, guitarist: Don’t Throw Your Love on Me So Strong, Think Twice before You Speak, Born under a Bad Sign, Cold Feet; died Dec 21, 1992

1930 - Paul Mazursky
director: Harry and Tonto, An Unmarried Woman, Scenes from a Mall, The Pickle, Moscow on the Hudson, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Tempest

1932 - Willis ‘Gator’ Jackson
composer, tenor sax: invented the gator horn: Chuck’s Chuckles, Dance of the Lady Bug, Back Door, Later Gator; married to singer Ruth Brown; died Oct 25, 1987

1932 - Meadowlark (George) Lemon
basketball: Harlem Globetrotters

1933 - Jerry Leiber
record producer with Mike Stoller: Hard Times, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, Up on the Roof, On Broadway, Chapel of Love

1933 - J. Anthony Lukas
Pulitzer Prize-winning author: Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families; died June 5, 1997); died June 5, 1997

1935 - Robert Gutowski
U.S. pole vaulter: world record: 4.78m. [April 27, 1957

1940 - Al (Alfredo James) Pacino
Academy Award-winning actor: Scent of a Woman [1992]; Scarface, Serpico, The Godfather, Dick Tracy; Tony Award-winning actor: Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie [1969], The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel [1977]

1945 - Stu Cook
musician: bass: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Susie Q, Proud Mary, Keep on Chooglin’, Green River, Lodi, Bad Moon Rising, Wrote a Song for Everyone, Midnight Special, Down on the Corner, Up Around the Bend, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Who’ll Stop the Rain, Have You Ever Seen the Rain, Someday Never Comes

1945 - Bjorn Ulvaeus
musician: guitar, singer: group: Abba: Waterloo, Dancing Queen, I Have a Dream, LPs: The Album, Voulez-Vous, Super Trouper, The Visitors, Spanish Album, Arrival

1946 - Terry Hermeling
football: Washington Redskins tackle: Super Bowl VII

1946 - Talia Shire (Coppola)
actress: Godfather series, Rocky series, For Richer, For Poorer, A Century of Women, Blood Vows; sister of Producer/Director Francis Ford Coppola

1947 - Jeffrey DeMunn
actor: Ragtime, Frances The Shawshank Redemption, Rocket Man, The X Files, The Green Mile

1949 - Michael Brown (Lookofsky)
musician: keyboards: group: The Left Banke: Walk Away Renee, Pretty Ballerina, Desiree

1952 - Don Martineau
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings [all-star: 1976-1977]

1964 - Andy Bell
singer: group: Erasure: Sometimes, LP: Wonderland.

Chart Toppers
April 25th.

1947 Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
Unchained Melody - Al Hibler
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
I Will Follow Him - Little Peggy March
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean
Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5
Empty Arms - Sonny James

1979 Knock on Wood - Amii Stewart
Heart of Glass - Blondie
Music Box Dancer - Frank Mills
All I Ever Need is You - Kenny Rogers & Dottie West

1987 I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me) - Aretha Franklin & George Michael
Don’t Dream It’s Over - Crowded House
Sign ’o’ the Times - Prince
Rose in Paradise - Waylon Jennings


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-25-2007, 11:00 PM
116th day of 2007 - 249 remaining.

Thursday, April 26, 2007
ODD FELLOWS DAY. :D

The first Odd Fellows lodge in the U.S. was established in Baltimore, Maryland on this day in 1819. The official name of the organization is the Independent Order (of) Odd Fellows or IOOF. You can see these initials on many buildings in communities throughout the country. These are the Odd Fellows halls where the local, secret fraternal benefit meets. The first Odd Fellows group started in Great Britain in the 18th century.

The main focus of the fraternal order is “to relieve the brethren, bury the dead, and care for the widow and the orphan.” This focus has been broadened through the years to include the principles of friendship, love and truth.

The Odd Fellows maintain homes for the aged, the poor, widows and orphans and provide members with financial aid in sickness or death. U.S. national headquarters are located in Baltimore, MD and the membership of the order is more than 1.5 million.

Events
April 26th.


1803 - Over 2,300 meteorite stones, weighing between one quarter ounce and 20 pounds, rained down on the people of L’Aigle in northeastern France. The meteorites poured down along an 8-mile-long strip in this little town, 100 miles west of Paris. No one was hurt; but it was the first time scientists could verify that stones could come from outer space.

1921 - Weather broadcasts were heard for the first time on radio when WEW in St. Louis, MO aired weather news. Weather forecasts continue to be the top reason why people listen to radio; rating higher than music, news, sports and commercials! A sunny day to you wherever you may be on the planet...

1931 - NBC radio presented Lum and Abner for the first time. The popular program continued for 24 years on the air, not all of them on NBC. In fact, all four networks (CBS, ABC, Mutual and NBC) carried the program for a period of time. Lum and Abner hailed from the fictitious town of Pine Ridge. Fictitious, that is, before 1936, when Waters, Arkansas, changed its name to Pine Ridge.

1932 - Ed Wynn was heard on radio’s Texaco Star Theater for the first time. Wynn, a popular vaudeville performer, demanded a live audience to react to his humor if he was to make the switch to radio. The network consented and Wynn became radio’s first true superstar. He would later make the switch to TV.

1937 - This was a tragic day in history as German planes attacked the town of Guernica in Northern Spain. Without warning, the planes swooped down on the sleepy village, subjecting the citizens to three hours of continuous bombing. The village was left in flames; those who survived the bombs and tried to escape to surrounding fields were shot down by machine-gun fire from the air.

1937 - The publisher of LIFE magazine just about passed out when he looked at his just-off-the-press publication and noticed that someone had forgotten to put the word “LIFE” in the upper left-hand corner! It was the only time that LIFE was nameless. Since hundreds of thousands of copies were already printed, the magazine hit the streets with no name on the cover! The reason? A picture of a rooster would have had an obscured comb if the logotype had been used in the upper left-hand corner as usual.

1937 - The initial broadcast of Lorenzo Jones was heard over NBC radio this day. Karl Swenson played the lead role for the entire run of the serial. And quite a run it was. Lorenzo Jones was on the air until 1955.

1952 - Patty Berg set a new record for major women’s golf competition. She shot a 64 over 18 holes in a tournament in Richmond, California.

1954 - Grace Kelly, “Hollywood’s brightest and busiest star,” was seen on the cover of LIFE magazine. In a couple of years, the actress would leave the U.S. to become Princess Grace of Monaco.

1964 - The Boston Celtics wrapped up an unprecedented sixth consecutive NBA championship. The Celtics still had two more crowns to win, however, before the string would come to an end.

1970 - The musical, Company, opened on Broadway. It ran for 705 performances before parting company with appreciative audiences at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Company starred Elaine Stritch.

1975 - On top of the Billboard popular music chart was B.J. Thomas, with the longest title ever for a number one song. (Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song was number one for one week, though it took that long just to say the title.

1978 - An updated version of Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper appeared on television. In the lead role (his first TV special), was former Beatle, Ringo Starr. He sang new versions of Act Naturally, Yellow Submarine and With a Little Help from My Friends. No tellin’ what Mark Twain might have said...

1983 - For the first time, the Dow Jones industrial average moved over the 1200 mark, just two months after smashing the 1100 barrier.

1986 - At 1:23 a.m. in Pripyat in the Ukraine when the Chernobyl atomic power station exploded. A three-hundred-square-mile area was evacuated in an attempt to protect over 100,000 residents of the area from radiation poisoning. 31 people died and unknown thousands were exposed as the radioactive material carried in the atmosphere spread throughout the world.

1987 - Tennis star Chris Evert won her 150th career tennis tournament. She beat Martina Navratilova in Houston, Texas.

Birthdays
April 26th.

1785 - John James Audubon
ornithologist, artist: the original Birdman; died Jan 27, 1851

1822 - Frederick Law Olmsted
landscape architect: Yosemite National Park, Central Park in New York City and other city parks in Boston, MA, Hartford, CT and Louisville, KY; died Aug 28, 1903

1882 - Jessie Redmon Fauset
author: There is Confusion, Plum Bun, The Chinaberry Tree, Comedy, American Style; literary editor: Crisis [NAACP publication]; co-publisher & editor: The Brownie Book; died in 1961

1886 - Gertrude ‘Ma’ Rainey (Gertrude Malissa Nix Pridgett)
‘Mother of the Blues’: singer: C.C. Rider [aka See See Rider], Jelly Bean Blues, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Bo Weavil Blues; died Dec 22, 1939

1893 - Anita Loos
author, playwright: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, I Married an Angel, San Francisco, Saratoga, The Women; died Aug 18, 1981

1900 - Charles Francis Richter
seismologist: invented the Richter scale for measuring the magnitude of earthquakes; died Apr 30, 1985

1900 - Douglas Sirk (Claus Detlef Sierck)
director: Imitation of Life, A Time to Love & a Time to Die, Tarnished Angels, Written on the Wind, Magnificent Obsession, First Legion; died Jan 14, 1987

1917 - Sal (Salvatore Anthony) Maglie
‘The Barber’: baseball: pitcher: NY Giants [all-star: 1951, 1952/World Series: 1951, 1954], Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers [World Series: 1956], NY Yankees, SL Cardinals; died Dec 28, 1992

1924 - (Theodore Marcus) Teddy Edwards
jazz musician: tenor sax: Me and My Lover; died Apr 20, 2003

1926 - Bambi Linn (Linnemier)
dancer, actress: Your Show of Shows, Oklahoma!

1927 - John Ralston
football: coach: Cal State Univ at San Jose, Stanford Univ; Coach/GM: Denver Broncos

1933 - Carol Burnett
Emmy Award-winning comedienne, actress: Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall [1962-1963], Carol & Company [1962-1963], Mad About You [1996-1997]; The Carol Burnett Show, Carol Burnett and Friends, The Garry Moore Show

1937 - Robert Boozer
basketball: Kansas State Univ., U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team [1960 gold medal]

1938 - Nino Benvenuti
International Boxing Hall of Famer: European Junior Middleweight title [1957, 1959], Olympic boxing gold medal [Rome, 1960], Junior Middleweight Champ [1965-1966], Ring Magazine Fighter of the Year [1968]; Middleweight Champ [1967-1970]; retired in 1971, total bouts: 90: won 82, lost 7, tied 1, knockouts 35

1938 - Maurice Williams
singer, songwriter: group: Zodiacs: Stay

1938 - Duane Eddy
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame guitarist: Rebel-’rouser, Forty Miles of Bad Road, Because They’re Young, Theme from Peter Gunn; actor: Because They’re Young, A Thunder of Drums, The Wild Westerners, The Savage Seven, Kona Coast

1941 - Claudine Clark
singer: Party Lights

1941 - (Dr.) Gary Cuozzo
football: Univ of Virginia all-American; NFL: QB: Baltimore Colts, NO Saints, Minnesota Vikings [Super Bowl IV], SL Cardinals; orthodontist [with his son] in Middletown NJ

1941 - Bruce MacGregor
hockey: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, NY Rangers; VP: Edmonton Oilers

1942 - Bobby Rydell (Robert Ridarelli)
singer: Wild One, We Got Love, Swingin’ School, Kissin’ Time, Volare, Forget Him; actor: Bye Bye Birdie, That Lady from Peking

1947 - Donna De Varona
Olympic Hall of Famer: 400-meter individual swimming medley [1964]; International Swimming Hall of Famer; International Women’s Sports Hall of Famer; sportscaster; founder of Women’s Sports Foundation

1947 - Boyd Matson
TV news anchor, correspondent: U.S.A. Today-The Television Series, The Real Story; TV host: National Geographic Explorer

1947 - Amos (Joseph) Otis
baseball: NY Mets, KC Royals [all-star: 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976], Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1980]

1958 - Giancarlo Esposito
actor: The Usual Suspects, Smoke, Reckless, Blue in the Face, Malcolm X, Do the Right Thing, Sweet Lorraine, Bakersfield P.D.

Chart Toppers
April 26th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
Manana - Peggy Lee
The Dickey Bird Song - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn Hughes)
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
Ivory Tower - Cathy Carr
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Do You Want to Know a Secret - The Beatles
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
Rockin’ Robin - Michael Jackson
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Chantilly Lace - Jerry Lee Lewis

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
With You I’m Born Again - Billy Preston & Syreeta
A Lesson in Leavin’ - Dottie West

1988 Where Do Broken Hearts Go - Whitney Houston
Devil Inside - INXS
Wishing Well - Terence Trent D’Arby
I’ll Always Come Back - K.T. Oslin


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-26-2007, 11:00 PM
117th day of 2007 - 248 remaining

Friday, April 27, 2007
WOODY WOODPECKER DAY. :D :D

On this, his birthday, we pay tribute to the man who created the fun-loving, slightly manic bird he called, Woody Woodpecker. Cartoonist Walter Lantz was born on this day in 1900 in New Rochelle, New York.

Many remember Walter Lantz only for Woody; however, one of his most famous moments was the creation of an animated opening sequence for Universal Studio’s first, major musical, The King of Jazz in 1930.

Lantz’ Woody Woodpecker made his first appearance in the 1940 film, Knock, Knock. He became so popular that his wacky laugh and taunting ways were celebrated in The Woody Woodpecker Song. By 1948, Lantz and his studio were celebrating the hit record success of that song, too.

Walter Lantz put several more decades of wonderful cartoon characters and films under his belt before he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science. It was 1979 when he was recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Oscar ceremonies.

Walter Lantz has left us and many generations to come with a lifetime of enjoyment; one can still see Woody Woodpecker in cartoons on television. You’ll recognize that zany laugh anywhere!

Events
April 27th.


1865 - The worst steamship disaster in the history of the United States occurred on this date. The Sultana, carrying approximately 2,300 passengers, the majority being freed Union POWs, exploded while en route to Cairo, IL. Neither the cause of the explosion nor the final count of the dead (estimated at between 1,450 and 2,000) was ever determined. Today, the Sultana disaster remains the worst of its kind.

1880 - Francis Clarke and M.G. Foster patented the electrical hearing aid.

1899 - The Western Golf Association was founded -- in Chicago, IL.

1938 - Geraldine Apponyi was the first American woman to become a Queen. She married King Zog of Albania.

1938 - Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded I Hadn’t Anyone ’til You for Victor Records. Jack Leonard was featured as vocalist.

1946 - The first commercial carrier ship to be equipped with radar, the SS African Star, was placed in service.

1947 - Organized baseball celebrated Babe Ruth Day. Major-league parks throughout the U.S. and Japan participated. A crowd of 60,000 fans honored their hero in ceremonies at Yankee Stadium in New York City. Ruth, who was dying of throat cancer, managed to put in an appearance to thank his former club.

1947 - The first broadcast of Studio One on CBS radio was broadcast. The show was full of great stars, but no sponsors. CBS dropped Studio One after a year on radio. The show, however, began a nine-year run on CBS-TV ... with sponsors.

1956 - Rocky Marciano relinquished his crown as heavyweight boxing champ when he retired from boxing this day.

1959 - Lloyd Price’s song, Personality, was released. Price had 10 songs that made it on the nation’s pop music charts in the 1950s through early 1960s.

1960 - The submarine, Tullibee, was launched from Groton, CT. It was the first sub to be equipped with closed-circuit television.

1968 - Muhammad Ali’s successor was finally decided after an eight-month runoff. Jimmy Ellis defeated Jerry Quarry of Atascadero, CA for the World Boxing Association’s heavyweight title.

1973 - Steve Busby of Kansas City lead the Royals to a 3-0, no-hit shutout of the Detroit Tigers.

1976 - Maxine Nightingale received a gold record for the single, Right Back Where We Started From. Nightingale was in the productions of Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, Godspell and Savages in the early ’70s. Right Back Where We Started From was a number two hit for two weeks in 1976.

1981 - Former Beatle Ringo Starr married Barbara Bach at the Marylebone Registry Office in London. Paul McCartney and wife Linda, George Harrison and Harry Nilsson were in attendance.

1983 - Nolan Ryan of the Houston Astros broke Walter Johnson’s strikeout record. He struck out the 3,509th batter of his career. The Astros won 4-2 over Montreal. Johnson’s record had been in the books for 55 years before being eclipsed by ‘The Ryan Express’.

Birthdays
April 27th.


1737 - Edward Gibbon
historian, author: History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; died Jan 16, 1794

1759 - Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
author: Vindication of the Rights of Women; died Sep 10, 1797

1791 - Samuel F.B. (Finley Breese) Morse
inventor: electromagnetic telegraph: 1st telegraph message: “What hath God wrought?”; died Apr 2, 1872

1822 - Ulysses S. Grant
18th U.S. President [1869-1877]; married to Julia Dent [three sons, one daughter]; Lt. General in command of all Union armies during U.S. Civil War; nickname: Hero of Appomattox; died July 23, 1885

1896 - Rogers ‘Rajah’ Hornsby
baseball: SL Cardinals [League MVP Award: 1925/World Series: 1926, 1929], NY Giants, Boston Braves, Chicago Cubs, SL Browns; died Jan 5, 1963

1900 - Walter Lantz
Academy Award-winning animator: creator of Woody Woodpecker; died Mar 22, 1994; see Woody Woodpecker Day [above]

1916 - Enos (Bradsher) ‘Country’ Slaughter
Baseball Hall of Famer: SL Cardinals [all-star: 1941, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953/World Series: 1942, 1946], NY Yankees [World Series: 1956, 1957, 1958], KC Athletics, Milwaukee Braves; died Aug 12, 2002

1922 - Jack Klugman
Emmy Award-winning actor: The Defenders: Blacklist [1963-1964], The Odd Couple [1970-1971, 1972-1973]; Quincy, M.E., Twelve Angry Men, Days of Wine and Roses, Goodbye Columbus

1927 - Coretta Scott King
civil rights leader: wife of Dr. Martin Luther King; died Jan 31, 2006

1932 - Anouk Aimee (Françoise Sorya Dreyfus)
actress: La Dolce Vita, Lola, A Man and a Woman, Dr. Bethune, Ready to Wear

1932 - Casey Kasem
Kemal Amin Kasem) (radio DJ/announcer/host: American Top 40; actor: Hawaii Five-O, The Hardy Boys Mysteries, >Charlie’s Angels; character voice: Tiny Toon Adventures, Scooby Doo series

1932 - Chuck Knox
football: head coach: LA Rams [1973-76, 1992-94], Buffalo Bills [1978-1982], Seattle Seahawks [1983-1991]

1932 - Maxine (Ella) Brown
singer: group: The Browns: The Three Bells; Scarlet Ribbons, The Old Lamplighter; solo: Sugar Cane Country

1933 - Calvin Newborn
jazz/blues guitarist; brother of piano wizard Phineas Newborn Jr.

1937 - Sandy Dennis
Academy Award-winning actress: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolff [1966]; The Execution, Splendor in the Grass; died Mar 2, 1992

1937 - Phil Jones
newsman: CBS News

1939 - Judy Carne (Joyce Betterill)
comedienne, actress: Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In: “Sock It to Me!”; The Americanization of Emily, Only with Married Men, Love on a Rooftop, Kraft Music Hall Presents Sandler & Young, Fair Exchange, The Baileys of Balboa

1941 - Lee Roy Jordan
football: Dallas Cowboys linebacker: Super Bowls V, VI, X

1942 - Bob Foster
International Boxing Hall of Famer: light heavyweight champion [1968-74]: won 56 of 65 professional fights

1944 - Doug Buffone
football: Chicago Bears

1947 - Mack Alston
football: Washington Redskins tight end: Super Bowl VII; Houston Oilers, Baltimore Colts

1947 - Pete Ham
musician: guitar, piano, singer: group: Badfinger: Maybe Tomorrow, Day After Day, No Matter What, Baby Blue; died Apr 23, 1975

1947 - Keith Magnuson
hockey: All-American: Univ. of Denver; NHL: Chicago Blackhawks; coach: Chicago Blackhawks

1947 - Dave Peel
punk rocker: group: The Lower East Side: LP: The Pope Smokes Dope

1948 - Kate Pierson
musician: organ, singer; group: The B-52’s: Rock Lobster, Quiche Lorraine, 606-0842, Dance this Mess Around

1949 - Clive Taylor
musician: bass: group: Amen Corner: Gin House Blues, Bend Me Shape Me, [If Paradise is] Half As Nice, Natural Sinner

1951 - Paul Daniel ‘Ace’ Frehley
musician: group: Kiss [the spaceman]: Rock and Roll All Nite, Beth, Forever and I Was Made for Lovin’ You; formed Frehley’s Comet

1951 - Gary Huff
football: Florida State Univ., Tampa Bay Buccaneers

1952 - George Gervin
Basketball Hall of Famer: ‘Iceman’: San Antonio Spurs: led NBA in scoring 1977-1980, 1981-1982

1959 - Sheena Easton (Sheena Shirley Orr)
singer: Modern Girl, Morning Train, One Man Woman, When He Shines, For Your Eyes Only, We Got Tonight, Strut, Sugar Walls

1959 - Marco Pirroni
musician: guitar, songwriter: groups: Siouxsie & the Banshees: The Lord’s Prayer; Adam & The Ants: Prince Charming, Stand and Deliver, LP: Friend or Foe.

Chart Toppers
April 27th.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Blue Barron Orchestra (vocal: ensemble)
Forever and Ever - Perry Como
"A" You’re Adorable - Perry Como
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
Mama Look at Bubu - Harry Belafonte
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders
Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter - Herman’s Hermits
I Know a Place - Petula Clark
This is It - Jim Reeves

1973 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree - Dawn featuring Tony
Orlando
Sing - Carpenters
The Cisco Kid - War
Superman - Donna Fargo

1981 Kiss on My List - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
Being with You - Smokey Robinson
A Headache Tomorrow (Or a Heartache Tonight) - Mickey Gilley

1989 Like a Prayer - Madonna
Funky Cold Medina - Tone Loc
I’ll Be There for You - Bon Jovi
The Church on Cumberland Road - Shenandoah


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-27-2007, 11:00 PM
118th day of 2007 - 247 remaining.

Saturday, April 28, 2007
SMALL CAR DAY.

Small cars were offered for sale in the U.S. for the first time on this day in 1939. Actually, these little cars would make today’s compact cars look like land yachts! Imagine a car that sold for $325, was 10-feet long, had an 80-inch wheelbase and a four-gallon gas tank. We just described the Crosley which became fairly popular back in 1939 -- but wouldn’t survive.

Once the war effort got underway, auto manufacturing was cut back for defense needs. After World War II, people wanted luxury and size in their automobiles; considered better for family needs. The little Crosley fought an uphill battle and was replaced less than 15 years later by the popular German Volkswagen Beetle. Remember? It was more affectionately called the Bug. Every now and then we see one of these little cars (with their engines in the trunk) still chugging around. The Bug’s newest relative, the version with bug-eyed headlights (the engine’s in the front), is the latest popular small car.

The next really small car promises to be the electric one ... and, they are small, very small ... hardly bigger than a roller skate.

Events
April 28th.

1788 - Maryland was one of the first of the United States of America, entering the Union as number seven on this day. It was named in honor of England’s Charles I’s queen, Henrietta Maria. Maryland’s capital city, Annapolis, is famous as the home of the U.S. Naval Academy. Maryland, the Free State or Old Line State, calls the black-eyed Susan its state flower, and the Baltimore Orioles are the ... yes, the state’s baseball team ... but also, the state bird/s. Using this same reasoning, you’d think that baseball would be the state sport. Silly us. Maryland’s state sport is jousting. Yeah ... and several other Maryland’s state symbols are equally puzzling: state folk dance: square dancing, state boat: skipjack. State boat? Other more reasonable Maryland symbols include: dog - Chesapeake Bay retriever; fish - rockfish; crustacean - Maryland blue crab; tree - white oak; insect - Baltimore checkerspot butterfly. "Maryland, My Maryland" is the official state song. Its state motto: Fatti maschii, parole femine. In English: Manly deeds, womanly words.

1789 - There truly was mutiny on the Bounty. A rebel crew took over the British ship and set sail to Pitcairn Island. A popular book about the event has been passed down generation to generation as one of the classic works of literature.

1896 - The Addressograph was patented by J.S. Duncan of Sioux City, IA.

1926 - American League baseball owners agreed to have home plate umpires carry resin on the field for the benefit of pitchers with sweaty hands. However, it was mandated that pitchers were not to ask for the sticky powder. This scheme was scrapped when someone, possibly a disgruntled pitcher, came up with the idea of putting resin in absorbent bags to be left in the area of the pitching mound and used by the pitcher as needed.

1932 - A vaccine against yellow fever was announced this day.

1937 - The first animated-cartoon electric sign was displayed on a building on Broadway in New York City. The sign was the creation of Douglas Leigh. It consisted of several thousand light bulbs and presented a four-minute show that featured a cavorting horse and ball-tossing cats.

1940 - Pennsylvania 6-5000, the classic Glenn Miller signature song, was recorded on Bluebird Records. Looking at the original label on the old 78-RPM disk, we find record number 10754, in fact.

1947 - Explorer Thor Heyerdahl set sail from the Peruvian coast in the 45-foot Kon Tiki. The 4,300-mile voyage concluded 101 days later. Heyerdahl wrote a popular book about the ordeal called -- you guessed it -- Kon Tiki.

1957 - One of TV’s most respected personalities was seen for the first time coast to coast. Mike Wallace was the host of The Mike Wallace Interview, a Sunday night program that featured the grilling of greats, including Gloria Swanson, Steve Allen and stripper, Lili St. Cyr.

1959 - The TV program, Hallmark Hall of Fame, featured one of the best TV dramas on the air, according to critics. Eugene O’Neil’s Ah, Wilderness starred a who’s who of American performers including Lloyd Nolan, Helen Hayes, Burgess Meredith and Betty Field.

1959 - Arthur Godfrey was seen for the last time in the final telecast of Arthur Godfrey and His Friends on CBS-TV. The show had been a part of the CBS lineup for 10 years. We remember the Little Godfreys: Tony Marvin (announcer), singers Carmel Quinn, Lou Ann Sims, Frank Parker, Janette Davis, Marion Marlowe and Julius LaRosa. “Howaya, Howaya, Howaya.”

1961 - Warren Spahn pitched his second no-hit game for the Milwaukee Braves. He beat the San Francisco Giants 1-0. Not bad for a guy who was 41 years old at the time.

1962 - The fourth American runner to break the four-minute mile was Jim Grelle. He broke the mark at 3 minutes, 59.9 seconds in Walnut Creek, CA. Talk about cutting it close...

1967 - Muhammad Ali, the former Cassius Clay, refused induction into the U.S. Army. Critics and supporters spent years discussing the boxing champ’s refusal to serve in the armed forces. In fact, Ali’s world heavyweight crown was later taken away from him as a result of his actions, which he said were based on religious grounds.

1985 - The little town of Parker, TX, not far from Dallas, reported a 2-to-1 edge in the ratio of tourists to residents. Some of the good citizens of the town of just over 1,000 residents were not pleased, either. Some 2,100 tourists each day converged on the town to visit Southfork Ranch, the home of the Ewing family of the CBS-TV hit, Dallas.

1987 - For the first time, a compact disc of an album was released before its vinyl counterpart. The Art of Excellence by Tony Bennett, his first recorded work in a decade, went on sale.

Birthdays
April 28th.

1758 - James Monroe
5th U.S. President [1817-1825]; married to Elizabeth Kortright [one son, two daughters]; nickname: The Last ****ed Hat; died July 4, 1831

1871 - Louise Homer
opera singer: contralto: NY Metropolitan Opera House [1900-1919]; died May 6, 1947

1874 - Sidney Toler
actor: Charlie Chan at the Wax Museum, Charlie Chan in Rio, The Jade Mask, The Scarlet Clue, The Shanghai Cobra, Terror by Night, Meeting at Midnight; died Feb 12, 1947

1878 - Lionel Barrymore (Blythe)
Academy Award-winning actor: A Free Soul [1930-31]; Camille, Captains Courageous, Duel in the Sun, It’s a Wonderful Life, Key Largo, The Little Colonel; died Nov 15, 1954

1902 - Red (Charles Frederick) Lucas
‘The Nashville Narcissus’: baseball: pitcher: NY Giants, Boston Braves, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates; died July 9, 1986

1917 - Robert Anderson
playwright: Tea and Sympathy, Sand Pebbles, I Never Sang for My Father, The Nun’s Story

1926 - Blossom Dearie
singer: group: Blue Stars: French version of Lullaby in Birdland; own record label: Daffodil Records

1926 - (Nelle) Harper Lee
author: To Kill a Mockingbird

1929 - Carolyn Jones
actress: The Tender Trap, The Seven Year Itch, Marjorie Morningstar, King Creole, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, House of Wax, How the West was Won, The Addams Family; died Aug 3, 1983

1934 - Jackie (John George) Brandt
baseball: NY Giants, SL Cardinals, SF Giants, Baltimore Orioles [all-star: 1961], Philadelphia Phillies, Houston Astros

1938 - Madge Sinclair
Emmy Award-winning actress: Gabriel’s Fire [1990-91], Trapper John M.D., Roots, Ohara, Me and the Boys, Grandpa Goes to Washington, A Century of Women, The End of Innocence, Coming to America, Convoy, Conrack; died Dec 20, 1995

1941 - Ann-Margret (Olsson)
actress: Carnal Knowledge, Tommy, Viva Las Vegas, Grumpy Old Men, Grumpier Old Men, Bye, Bye, Birdie, Scarlett; singer: I Just Don’t Understand

1945 - John Wolters
musician: drums: group: Dr. Hook

1948 - Marcia Strassman
actress: Welcome Back Kotter, Honey I Shrunk the Kids, Honey I Blew Up the Kids, Another Stakeout; singer

1948 - Pablo (Arnoldo) Torrealba
baseball: pitcher: Atlanta Braves, Oakland Athletics, Chicago White Sox

1949 - Bruno Kirby
actor: The Basketball Diaries, Fallen Angels 2, City Slickers, When Harry Met Sally, Good Morning, Vietnam, This is Spinal Tap, Birdy, The Godfather, Part 2, The Harrad Experiment, The Super; died Aug 14, 2006

1950 - Jay Leno
comedian, TV talk show host: The Tonight Show

1950 - Jim Wiley
hockey: NHL: Pittsburgh Penguins, Vancouver Canucks; head coach: Kansas City Blades, Kentucky Thoroughblades

1953 - Tony Peters
football: Washington Redskins safety: Super Bowl XVII

1971 - Chris Young
actor: Falcon Crest, Max Headroom, Married People, Live-In, P.C.U., Deep Down, The Runestone, December, Book of Love, The Great Outdoors.
Also on this day in history, we have a very special birthday gal. I want to send a very happy birthday wish out to, Diana. :) from your husband, Harold, Aka. makebelieve, a WorldStart member. :)

Chart Toppers
April 28th.

1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
My Foolish Heart - The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra (vocal: Eileen Wilson)
The Third Man Theme - Alton Karas
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 Tequila - The Champs
All I Have to Do is Dream - The Everly Brothers
The Witch Doctor - David Seville
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 (You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down) - Cher
Secret Agent Man - Johnny Rivers
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) - MFSB featuring The Three Degrees
Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me - Gladys Knight & The Pips
The Loco-Motion - Grand Funk
Hello Love - Hank Snow

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Chariots of Fire - Titles - Vangelis
Crying My Heart Out Over You - Ricky Skaggs

1990 Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinead O’Connor
I Wanna Be Rich - Calloway
How Can We Be Lovers - Michael Bolton
Love on Arrival - Dan Seals


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-28-2007, 11:00 PM
119th day of 2007 - 246 remaining.

Sunday, April 29, 2007
SIR DUKE DAY.

The man who became one of the twentieth century’s finest composers, Edward Kennedy Ellington, was born on this day in 1899 in Washington, D.C. Right from the git-go, the handsome, sharply dressed teenager (that’s where he got the nickname, Duke) was headed for success.

At first it was art. He won a poster-design contest and an art scholarship, left school and started a sign-painting business.

But it was his natural piano-playing ability that attracted the young women, so Duke Ellington headed in that direction. He played with Elmer Snowden’s band and took over leadership in 1925. They played and stayed at New York’s Cotton Club from 1927 through 1931, broadcasting shows live on the radio. From then on it was tours, recordings, and history in the making. Ellington would be one of the founders of big band jazz.

With the players in his band as his instruments, the Duke would create big band pieces, film scores, operas, ballets, Broadway shows, even gospel music. He would work with each section of his orchestra as an entity unto its own and then bring them together to create the unique sounds such as, Mood Indigo. Over 1,000 musical pieces are credited to the great Duke Ellington. James Lincoln Collier studied the Duke and his Orchestra, comparing Duke Ellington to a “master chef who plans the menus, trains the assistants, supervises them, tastes everything, adjusts the spices ... and in the end we credit him with the result.”

Andre Previn said, “Duke merely lifts his finger, three horns make a sound, and I don’t know what it is.”

According to Duke Ellington, who died in 1974, “There are only two kinds of music: good and bad.”

Events
April 29th.

1813 - A patent for rubber was given to J.F. Hummel of Philadelphia, PA.

1864 - Theta Xi, a professional fraternity, was founded -- in Troy, NY.

1879 - Electric arc lights were used for the first time -- in Cleveland, OH.

1941 - The Boston Bees agreed to rename the National League team the Braves, the name they used prior to 1935.

1945 - American soldiers liberated the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany, where tens of thousands of people had perished.

1953 - Coke Time with Eddie Fisher began its TV and radio run on NBC-TV and Mutual radio. Fisher, a popular performer, was seen and heard on more TV and radio stations in 1954 than any other entertainer. Oh, my! (Papa)

1954 - Ernest Borgnine made his network television debut in Night Visitor on Ford Theatre on NBC-TV. The versatile film (Marty) star would later become a sitcom sensation in McHale’s Navy with comedian Tim Conway on CBS and, later, as a helicopter owner in Airwolf.

1959 - UNIVAC, the electronic computer that was the size of a house, actually picked four out of six winners at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY. The electronic brain set a record for right choices in horse races. Of course, the winners all paid 2-1 or even odds, so it didn’t win much. But, most of us don’t...

1960 - Dick Clark told a House of Representatives investigating committee looking into the payola scandal that he, the host of American Bandstand, never took payola for records featured on his daily TV show. Clark would, however, relinquish rights to music publishing that he owned. The value of those rights, Clark indicated 30 years later, amounted to about $80 million.

1961 - “Spanning the globe ... to bring you the constant variety of sport, the constant variety of human competition, the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. This is ABC’s Wide World of Sports.” A Saturday afternoon sports program began its long run on ABC-TV. The show, featuring Jim McKay as host, along with Howard Cosell, Frank Gifford, Al Michaels, Jack Whitaker, Heywood Hale Brun and others, was not an immediate hit. Although Roone Arledge’s vision of a worldwide window on televised sports got off to a slow start, ABC’s Wide World of Sports became one of TV’s most popular and enduring programs.

1968 - Hair made its way from Greenwich Village to to the Biltmore Theatre on Broadway. The show certainly opened eyes. It was the first time that actors appeared nude in a Broadway musical. Hair ran for 1,844 shows on and off Broadway. It was even more successful in its London run later. Big songs from the show: Hair (The Cowsills) and Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The 5th Dimension).

1969 - Sir Duke, Duke Ellington, celebrated his 70th birthday. He was honored with the presentation of the Medal of Freedom, the U.S. government’s highest civilian honor.

1974 - Phil Donahue’s TV show was on the move. Donahue was moving to Chicago, IL, where it would remain until 1985. The show was originally based in Dayton, OH. Following more than a decade in the Windy City, the show again moved, this time to New York City. During its stay in Chicago, Donahue earned nine Emmy Awards.

1981 - Steve Carlton, the Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, became the first left hander in the major leagues to get 3,000 career strikeouts. He fanned Montreal’s Tim Wallach in the first inning of a game that saw the Phillies beat the Expos 6-2. Carlton was only the sixth major leaguer to strikeout 3,000 batters.

1985 - George Steinbrenner, owner of the New York Yankees, fired manager Yogi Berra. Berra was canned after only 16 games into the young baseball season. In his place, Steinbrenner brought Billy Martin back ... for the fourth time.

1986 - Roger Clemens of the Boston Red Sox set a major-league baseball record by striking out 20 Seattle Mariner batters on the way to a 3-2 win. This record for the Bosox hurler surpassed the 19 strikeouts for a nine-inning game held by Nolan Ryan when he pitched for the California Angels. Tom Seaver of the New York Mets and Steve Carlton of the St. Louis Cardinals also held a piece of the previous 19-KO record.

2005 - (Thanks to Jill Brown [jillb1054@bellsouth.net]): JAG ended it’s ten-season TV run with a flip of a coin -- frozen in mid air -- that still leaves us wondering if it was Harm, or was it Mac (Sara), who gave up their career in order for the couple to be together.

Birthdays
April 29th.

1745 - Oliver Ellsworth
Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court [3rd to be selected]; died Nov 26, 1807

1863 - William Randolph Hearst
publisher of U.S. newspapers and magazines; influenced the establishment of comic strips; built San Simeon estate; subject of biography, Citizen Kane; grandfather of Patricia Hearst; died Aug 14, 1951

1899 - Duke (Edward Kennedy) Ellington
musician, composer, bandleader; died May 24, 1974; see Sir Duke Day [above]

1901 - Hirohito
Japan’s longest-reigning emperor; died Jan 7, 1989

1907 - Fred Zinnemann
Academy Award-winning director: High Noon [1952], From Here to Eternity [1953], A Man for All Seasons [1966]; died Mar 14, 1997

1909 - Tom Ewell (Samuel Yewell Tompkins)
Tony Award-winning actor: The Seven Year Itch [1953]; The Tom Ewell Show, Easy Money; died Sep 12, 1994

1912 - Richard Carlson
actor: I Led Three Lives, MacKenzie’s Raiders, Creature from the Black Lagoon, The Doomsday Flight, Tormented; died Nov 24, 1977

1915 - Donald Mills
singer: group: The Mills Brothers: Tiger Rag, Nobody’s Sweetheart, Dinah, Paper Doll, Glow Worm, You Always Hurt the One You Love, Cab Driver; died Nov 13, 1999

1918 - George Allen
football: head coach: LA Rams, Washington Redskins [Super Bowl VII]: “Losing is like death.”; sportscaster; died Dec 31, 1990

1919 - Celeste Holm
Academy Award-winning actress: Gentlemen’s Agreement [1947]; All About Eve, High Society, The Tender Trap, Three Men and a Baby

1925 - Danny Davis (George Nowland)
Grammy Award-winning bandleader: group: Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass: Best Country Instrumental Performance [1969]; Country Music Awards Instrumental Group of the Year [1969 - 1974]

1928 - Carl Gardner
singer: group: The Coasters: Down in Mexico, Searchin’, Young Blood, Yakety Yak, Charlie Brown, Along Came Jones, Poison Ivy, Little Egypt

1929 - Mickey (Maurice Joseph ‘Maury’) McDermott
baseball: pitcher: Boston Red Sox, Washington Nationals, NY Yankees [World Series: 1956], KC Athletics, Detroit Tigers, SL Cardinals; died Aug 7, 2003

1931 - (Anthony James) Lonnie Donegan
folk singer, musician: guitar, banjo: Rock Island Line, Gambling Man, Cumberland Gap, Lost John, Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour [On the Bedpost Overnight]; died Nov 3, 2002

1933 - Keith Baxter
actor: Berlin Blues, Ash Wednesday, Chimes at Midnight

1933 - Rod McKuen
singer: If You Go Away; poet-song writer

1934 - Luis Aparicio (Luis Ernesto Montiel)
Baseball Hall of Fame shortstop: Chicago White Sox [AL Rookie of the Year: 1956/all-star: 1958-1962, 1970/World Series: 1959], Baltimore Orioles [all-star: 1963, 1964, 1971, 1972/World Series: 1966], Boston Red Sox; shortstop records: most games [2,581], assists [8,016], chances [12,564], double plays [1,553]; stole over 50 bases three straight seasons leading league in steals 9 consecutive times

1936 - Zubin Mehta
conductor: Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra

1936 - April Stevens (Carol Lo Tempio)
singer: Deep Purple, Whispering, Stardust

1937 - Jean Gauthier
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, Philadelphia Flyers, Boston Bruins

1943 - Duane Allen
singer: group: Oak Ridge Boys: Talk About the Good Times, Where the Soul Never Dies, Cryin’ Again, American Made, Love Song, I Guess It Never Hurts to Cry Sometimes, Everyday, Make My Life with You, Little Things, Touch a Hand Make a Friend, Elvira

1944 - Jim Hart
football [quarterback]: SL Cardinals [record: most yards passing, career: 34,639 yards: 1966-83]

1947 - Jim Ryun
runner; member U.S. House of Representative [from Kansas]

1947 - Tommy James (Jackson)
singer: group: Tommy James and The Shondells: I Think We’re Alone Now, Hanky Panky, Mony Mony, Crimson and Clover, Sweet Cherry Wine, Crystal Blue Persuasion; solo: Draggin’ the Line, I’m Comin’ Home, Three Times in Love

1947 - Johnny Miller
golf champion: U.S. Open [1973], British Open [1976]; shares record for lowest 18-hole total [63]

1949 - Francis Rossi
musician: guitar, singer: group: Status Quo: LPs: Picturesque Matchstickable, Piledriver, Hello, On the Level, Blue for You

1951 - Dale Earnhardt
NASCAR auto racer: champ: Winston Cup [7 times], Daytona [34 times], 76 career victories; killed in crash in Daytona 500 Feb 18, 2001

1954 - Jerry Seinfeld
Emmy Award-winning producer: Seinfeld [1992-1993]; comedian, actor

1955 - Kate Mulgrew
actress: Columbo, Ryan’s Hope, Roots, Daddy, Throw Momma from the Train

1957 - Daniel Day-Lewis
Academy Award-winning actor: My Left Foot [1989]; The Unbearable Lightness of Being, In the Name of the Father, Age of Innocence, Gandhi, A Room with a View

1958 - Michelle Pfeiffer
actress: Dangerous Liaisons, Batman Returns, The Fabulous Baker Boys, Grease 2, Ladyhawke, Scarface, The Witches of Eastwicke, The Age of Innocence

1958 - Eve Plumb
actress: The Brady Bunch, Little Women, ... And God Spoke, A Very Brady Christmas, Force of Evil

1968 - Carnie Wilson
singer; group: Wilson Phillips; daughter of The Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson, sister of singer Wendy Wilson

1970 - Andre Agassi
tennis champion: Wimbledon [1992], U.S. Open [1994]

1970 - Uma (Karuna) Thurman
actress: The Truth about Cats and Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Mad Dog and Glory, Final Analysis, Robin Hood, Henry and June, Dangerous Liaisons, Kiss Daddy Goodnight.

Chart Toppers
April 29th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
Would I Love You - Patti Page
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I - Elvis Presley
Guitar Boogie Shuffle - The Virtues
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You - The Monkees
Sweet Soul Music - Arthur Conley
Need You - Sonny James

1975 (Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song
- B.J. Thomas
He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) - Tony Orlando & Dawn
Supernatural Thing - Ben E. King
Blanket on the Ground - Billie Jo Spears

1983 Come on Eileen - Dexys Midnight Runners
Beat It - Michael Jackson
Der Kommissar - After the Fire
American Made - The Oak Ridge Boys

1991 Baby Baby - Amy Grant
Joyride - Roxette
I Like the Way (The Kissing Game) - Hi-Five
Down Home - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-29-2007, 11:00 PM
120th day of 2007 - 245 remaining.

Monday, April 30, 2007
WILLIE NELSON DAY. :)

Born in Abbott, Texas on this day in 1933, once just a singing cowboy, today a superstar whose major concern is the welfare of the American farmer. That’s pretty much the way Willie Nelson would describe himself.

His major love throughout his life has been to sing and play his guitar. He’s been through several wives and not had much time to spend with his children ... not that he didn’t want to ... but the call of the road has been all too powerful for the bandana-wearing, singing cowboy. Willie Nelson loves nothing better than to travel in his bus (you’d recognize it with its colorful, painted mural) across the United States, stopping at music theatres along the way to sing to his fans.

His other dedication is to the plight of the American farmer. Every year, Willie leads the Farm Aid benefit to raise money to help the poor farmers who have lost so much to major farm conglomerates and big government.

Willie Nelson is no stranger to big government. He’s probably the only American to have owed $32 million in back taxes and paid every penny he owed including penalties and interest. He almost lost his Texas ranch, his bus, and everything else he owned.

But, the recipient of the 1989 Grammy Living Legend Award prefers to sing. “I’m on the road again...”

Events
April 30th.

1812 - There aren’t many states that can boast an abundance of pelicans, but Louisiana, the 18th state to enter the United States of America, has plenty. That’s why it calls itself the Pelican State and the state bird is the eastern brown pelican. Named in honor of Louis XIV of France, Louisiana has several other nicknames: Sportsman’s Paradise, Sugar State (that’s beet sugar), and Creole State. The capital of Louisiana is Baton Rouge and the beautiful magnolia is its adopted flower while the state tree is the bald cypress. All together now, let’s sing You are My Sunshine, Louisiana’s state song. Give Me Louisiana is also considered a state song, and the state motto is: Union, justice and confidence. We’re not too confident in choosing which song to sing, though.

1889 - The first national holiday in the United States was celebrated. The citizens of the U.S. observed the centennial of George Washington’s inauguration. Although this is no longer a national holiday, you’ll be happy to know that there are now at least half a dozen holidays -- most on Mondays -- that give folks in the U.S. a day off from work and a reason to have a parade, picnic, or go shopping at the mall to take advantage of the holiday sales. These national holidays include: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King’s Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving Day.

1900 - Train engineer Casey Jones was killed when trying to save the Cannonball Express as it highballed its way through Vaughn, MS. The famous song about Jones is loosely relatable to the train accident which cost the railroad engineer his life.

1903 - Victor Records made its first Red Seal recording this day. The premiere disk featured Ada Crossley, an opera contralto.

1922 - Charlie Robertson of the Chicago White Sox pitched the major league’s fifth perfect game. The Chisox defeated the Detroit Tigers, 2-0.

1939 - The first railroad car equipped with fluorescent lights was put into service. The train car was known as the General Pershing Zephyr.

1939- Baseball’s ‘Iron Horse’, Lou Gehrig, played his last game with the New York Yankees on this day.

1939 - Public Television began. President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first chief executive to appear on TV. Roosevelt spoke at the opening ceremonies of the New York World’s Fair in Flushing, NY on WNBT in New York.

1940 - Jimmy Dorsey and his band recorded the bandleader’s signature song, Contrasts, for Decca Records. The song went on to become one of the most familiar big band themes of the era.

1940 - Belle Martell was licensed in California by state boxing officials to be the first American woman prize-fight referee!

1944 - The New York Giants (of baseball) whipped the Brooklyn Dodgers 26-8. They also set a major-league record for runs driven in by a team in a single game.

1945 - “How would you like to be queen for a day!” That opening line, delivered by host, Jack Bailey, was first heard on Mutual radio on this day. The first Queen for a Day was Mrs. Evelyn Lane. Years later Bailey would take the show to TV for a long, popular run.

1945 - Arthur Godfrey began his CBS radio morning show. His theme was Seems Like Old Times. Arthur Godfrey Time ran until this very same day in 1972. Godfrey’s show was different in that he used live talent and not records. His popularity with listeners was the major reason that several sponsors gave Godfrey the freedom to ad-lib their commercials and, from time to time, joke about the products as well.

1947 - Maps had to be changed as Boulder Dam was changed back to its original name, Hoover Dam. Some people, mostly those who live in the community of Boulder, Nevada, still refer to the dam as Boulder Dam. Many of them think that changing the dam’s name was a damn shame.

1953 - Frank Sinatra and Nelson Riddle became a team this day at Capitol Records in Hollywood. Sinatra’s new musical style, under Riddle’s direction, brought the crooner to the top of the record world for the second time in his illustrious career.

1955 - A few University of Iowa men students released a little pent-up energy. What did they do? They conducted panty raids at women’s dorms. Some say the Hawkeyes were still celebrating their February 28th basketball win (72-70) over the Golden Gophers of the University of Minnesota. Others think the men were celebrating the fact that enough snow had melted after the long winter to make it possible to find the women’s dorms again. In any case, panty raids became the in thing to do at colleges everywhere. Now that colleges have coed dorms, the raids have become a part of collegiate history along with the swallowing of goldfish.

1964 - TV sets would be drastically different after a ruling by the FCC stating that all TV receivers should be equipped to receive both VHF (channels 2-13) and the new UHF (channels 14-83). As a result, TV dealers scrambled to unload their VHF-only models as fast as possible. Antenna manufacturers were kept busy, as the new UHF receivers required new antennas too.

1975 - Saigon -- and all of Vietnam -- fell into communist hands this day, the unofficial end of the Vietnam War. As the U.S. withdrew completely from Saigon, the old noncommunist capital fell to North Vietnamese tanks. Americans commemorate the fall of Saigon with memorial services for the 58,153 Americans who died in Southeast Asia during the war.

1985 - The National Basketball Association set an all-time season attendance record as 19,506,355 fans attended games in arenas around the league. Seven NBA cities -- Boston, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia -- drew over a million fans each in the 1984-85 basketball season.

1987 - Three more compact discs of music by The Beatles went on sale for the first time. The discs were Help!, Rubber Soul and Revolver. All became hits again for the Fab Four.

Birthdays
April 30th.

1898 - Cornelius Vanderbilt
reporter, columnist, author, lecturer; great, great grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt, the railroad tycoon; died in 1974

1899 - Ellis Wilson
artist: Guggenheim Fellowship winner [1944]; The Open Market of Charleston, Haitian Funeral Procession; died Jan 1, 1977

1908 - Eve Arden (Eunice Quedens)
Emmy Award-winning actress: Our Miss Brooks [1953], Anatomy of a Murder, Grease, Stage Door, Tea for Two; died Nov 12, 1990

1910 - Al Lewis (Albert Meister)
actor: The Munsters, Car 54 Where are You?, My Grandpa is a Vampire, Married to the Mob; died Feb 3, 2006

1914 - Vermont Royster
Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, editor: The Wall Street Journal; columnist: Thinking Things Over; author: Journey through the Soviet Union, A Pride of Prejudices, My Own, My Country’s Time: A Journalist’s Journey; died July 22, 1996

1916 - Robert Shaw
conductor: Robert Shaw Chorale; music director of Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus; died Jan 25, 1999

1923 - Percy Heath
jazz musician: bass: founder of Modern Jazz Quartet; group: The Heath Brothers

1926 - Cloris Leachman
Academy Award-winning actress: The Last Picture Show [1971]; Emmy Award-winner: A Brand New Life [1972-73], The Mary Tyler Moore Show [1973-74], Cher [1974-75], Screen Actor’s Guild 50th Anniversary Celebration [1983-84]; Phyllis, Backstairs at the White House, The Facts of Life

1933 - Willie Nelson
singer: see Willie Nelson Day [above]

1938 - Gary Collins
actor: Born Free, The Iron Horse, Roots, The Sixth Sense, The Wackiest Ship in the Army

1940 - Burt Young
actor: Excessive Force, A Family Matter, Rocky series, Once Upon a Time in America, Convoy, Chinatown, Cinderella Liberty, Roomies

1941 - Johnny Farina
musician: rhythm guitar: group: Santo & Johnny: Sleepwalk, Tear Drop

1943 - Bobby Vee (Robert Velline)
singer: Devil or Angel, Rubber Ball, Take Good Care of My Baby, Run to Him, The Night Has a Thousand Eyes, Come Back when You Grow Up

1944 - Jill Clayburgh
actress: An Unmarried Woman, Luna, Portnoy’s Complaint, Semi-Tough, The Silver Streak, Terminal Man, Firestorm: 72 Hours in Oakland, Honor Thy Father and Mother

1944 - Richard Shoff
singer: group: The Sandpipers: Guantanamera, Come Saturday Morning

1946 - Don Schollander
Olympic Hall of Famer: 1st swimmer to win 4 gold medals in one Olympics [1964], also won two gold in 1968; International Swimming Hall of Famer: set 8 world records in the 400-meter freestyle and 9 in the 200-meter in his career; Sullivan Award (U.S. outstanding athlete [1964]

1948 - Perry King
actor: A Cry in the Night, Kaleidoscope, The Lord’s of Flatbush, Mandingo, Search and Destroy, Switch

1953 - Merrill Osmond
singer: [w/Jessica Boucher]: You’re Here to Remember, I’m Here to Forget; group: The Osmonds: Anytime; brother of Alan, Donny, Jay, Marie, Wayne, Jimmy

1967 - Turbo B (Durron Butler)
rap singer: group: Snap.

Chart Toppers
April 30th.

1944 I Love You - Bing Crosby
It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
San Fernando Valley - Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Blacksmith Blues - Ella Mae Morse
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 Stuck on You - Elvis Presley
Sink the Bismarck - Johnny Horton
Sixteen Reasons - Connie Stevens
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Cry like a Baby - The Box Tops
Young Girl - The Union Gap
The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde - Merle Haggard

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
Together Again - Emmylou Harris

1984 Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now - The Thompson Twins
Right or Wrong - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
04-30-2007, 11:00 PM
121st day of 2007 - 244 remaining.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007
MAY DAY.

Rally ’round the Maypole, as we gather this information for you to start this, the merry merry month of May!

May Day has been a traditional holiday celebration since ancient times. On this day, spring festivals and Maypoles are common. The Maypole is a tall pole that is covered with streamers, flowers and other decorations of spring. People grab hold of a streamer and dance around the pole to ward off ol’ man Winter for good. It is a way to shake the dreary winter blues once and for all.

Since the 1880s, May Day has been celebrated in some countries, particularly socialist nations, as a labor holiday.

In Hawaii, May Day is Lei Day. It’s a day when friends, lovers, bosses, relatives ... just about anyone and everyone ... gives the gift of a lei to another, putting it around the receiver’s neck and accompanying it with the traditional kiss. This custom of sharing the aloha spirit with a beautiful floral lei on Lei Day began in 1928. There are many celebrations throughout the Hawaiian islands; some complete with pageants, a Lei Queen and her court, Hawaiian music and hula dances.

Lei Day, May Day or any day, giving a lei is a beautiful way to say, “Aloha.”

Events
May 1st.

1751 - America’s first cricket tournament was held in New York City. Cricket is a popular European sport, played by teams of 11 players who use bats, balls and wickets.

1883 - Buffalo Bill (William F. Cody) staged his first Wild West Show.

1885 - The first skyscraper in America was under construction. No, it wasn’t in New York. It was a 10-story building located on the corner of LaSalle and Adams in Chicago, IL.

1920 - The longest baseball game (by innings) was played. The Boston Braves and the Brooklyn Dodgers played an incredible 26 innings -- with the same pitchers! Leon Cadore of Brooklyn and Boston’s Joe Oeschger went the distance and saw the game end in a 1-1 tie. Rumors that the groundskeeper had to roll up the poor pitchers’ arms after play was stopped are probably not far off...

1931 - Singer Kate Smith began her long and illustrious radio career with CBS on this, her birthday. The 22-year-old Smith started out with no sponsors and a paycheck of just $10 a week for the nationally broadcast daily program. However, within 30 days, her salary increased to a more respectable $1,500 a week!

1939 - The two-part Sy Oliver arrangement of Lonesome Road was recorded by the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. Listening carefully, one might note that the lead trombone is not that of Tommy Dorsey, but of Dave Jacobs, instead.

1955 - Jockey Willie Shoemaker rode the legendary Swaps to a win in the Kentucky Derby in Louisville. The Run for the Roses was worth $108,400. (Swap’s colt, Chateaugay, would win the 1963 Derby with the exact same time as his daddy’s: 2 minutes, 1-4/5 seconds.) This was Shoemaker’s first Derby win. He would win again in 1959 aboard Tommy Lee and in 1965 on Lucky Debonair.

1960 - An American U-2 plane invaded Soviet airspace. The Soviets reacted by shooting down the plane piloted by the C.I.A.’s Francis Gary Powers. It took five days for the Soviets to announce the occurrance to the rest of the world. At first the U.S. referred to the U-2 as a weather reconnaissance plane, denying that Powers was a spy. Later, the U.S. State Department admitted that the mission was to photograph Soviet military installations, and that the mission was justified. Powers was tried as a spy by the Soviet Union. He was sentenced to solitary confinement for 10 years in "Matrosskaya Tishina". In 17 months, he was exchanged for Russian spy Rudolf Abel who had been exposed by the CIA.

1967 - Elvis Presley got hitched to a girl he had dated since his army days in West Germany. Elvis and Priscilla Beaulieu married in Las Vegas, NV. The wedding cake, incidentally, cost $3,500. The marriage lasted until 1973.

1969 - Leonard Tose, a trucking executive from Philadelphia, PA, opened his wallet and pulled out $16,155,000 to buy himself the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. It was the largest price paid to that date for a pro football franchise. It was over a decade [1981] before the Eagles made it to the Super Bowl (XV: Oakland Raiders 27, Eagles 10) and they haven’t been to another one since.

1970 - Elton John and lyricist Bernie Taupin combined for the first time on Elton’s first American album simply titled, Elton John. The LP contained Elton’s first hit, Your Song, which made it to the top ten on the music charts in December.

1971 - A new word was introduced into the American traveling lexicon this day -- Amtrak. The word soon became synonymous with passenger train travel. Amtrak operates under the National Railroad Passenger Corporation. Now, people don’t take the train. They take Amtrak.

1982 - I Love Rock ’N Roll, by Joan Jett and The Blackhearts, appeared at the top of the pop music charts for the seventh, and final, week. The rocker stayed on the charts for 16 weeks. Jett from Philadelphia, PA played guitar and formed the all-female rock band, The Runaways in the mid-’70s. The Blackhearts were founded in 1980. Jett starred in the film, Light of Day, playing the role of leader of a rock band called The Barbusters. The movie also starred Michael J. Fox and Michael McKean. The title song, Light of Day, was written by Jett and Bruce Springsteen. Joan Jett and the Blackhearts had nine hits on the charts into 1990, but I Love Rock ’N Roll was the group’s only million-plus selling record.

1986 - Race car driver Bill Elliott set a stock car speed record with his Ford Thunderbird in Talladega, AL. Elliott zipped around the track at 212.229 mph.

Birthdays
May 1st.

1672 - Joseph Addison
essayist: periodicals: The Spectator, The Tatler, The Guardian, The Freeholder; author: Cato; died June 17, 1719

1825 - George Inness
artist: Peace and Plenty, Delaware Valley, Spring Blossoms; died Aug 3, 1894

1830 - Mary ‘Mother’ Jones
‘The Miner’s Angel’: labor leader; died Nov 30, 1930

1895 - Leo Sowerby
Pulitzer Prize-winning composer: The Canticle of the Sun [1946]; died July 7, 1968

1907 - Kate Smith
singer: God Bless America, When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain; performer: The Kate Smith Show [see above, 1931]; died June 17, 1986

1915 - Archie Williams
Olympic Gold Medalist: 400 meters in 46.5 seconds [1936], disputing Hitler’s theory of Aryan superiority; died June 24, 1993

1916 - Glenn Ford (Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford)
actor: The Teahouse of the August Moon, Blackboard Jungle, Midway, Don’t Go Near the Water, Cimarron, Final Verdict; died Aug 30, 2006

1917 - John Beradino
actor: General Hospital, The New Breed, I Led Three Lives, Don’t Look Back: The Story of Leroy ’Satchel’ Paige, Moon of the Wolf; baseball player; died May 19, 1996

1918 - Jack Paar
TV host: The Tonight Show; died Jan 27, 2004

1919 - Dan O’Herlihy
actor: Fail-Safe, Halloween 3, RoboCop; died Feb 17, 2005

1922 - Julian Goodman
president, chairman: NBC

1923 - Joseph Heller
writer: God Knows, Sex and the Single Girl, Dirty Dingus Magee, Catch-22; died Dec 10, 1999

1929 - Sonny James (James Loden)
The Southern Gentleman; singer: Young Love, First Date, First Kiss, First Love; appeared in films: Second Fiddle to a Steel Guitar, Nashville Rebel, Las Vegas Hillbillies, Hillbilly in a Haunted House

1930 - Ollie Matson
Pro Football Hall of Famer: San Francisco Univ. All-American; U.S. Olympic medal winner [track: 1952]; Chicago Cardinals [#1 draft pick: 1952/Pro Bowl MVP: 1956], LA Rams, Detroit Lions, Philadelphia Eagles; 12,844 combined net yards, 5,173 yards rushing, 222 receptions, 438 points, record 9 TDs on punt, kickoff returns, played in 5 Pro Bowls

1939 - Judy Collins
singer: Both Sides Now, Amazing Grace, Send In the Clowns

1940 - Bobbie Ann Mason
author: In Country, Spence and Lila

1945 - Rita Coolidge
singer: Higher and Higher, We’re All Alone, You, All Time High

1946 - Nick Fortune (Fortuna)
musician: bass: The Buckinghams: Kind of a Drag

1947 - Jerry Heard
golf: struck by lightning [w/Lee Trevino, Bobby Nichols] during 1975 Western Open [forced new safety standards in weather preparedness at PGA events]; developed Jerry Heard Super Swing technique

1954 - Ray Parker Jr.
singer, songwriter: Ghostbusters

1957 - Steve Farris
musician: guitar: group: Mr. Mister: Broken Wings, Kyrie, Is It love

1959 - Phil Smith
musician: saxophone: group: Haircut 100: Favourite Shirts , Love Plus One, Fantastic Day, Nobody’s Fool

1960 - Steve Cauthen
horse jockey: Triple Crown Winner [1978], riding Affirmed

1966 - Johnny Colt
musician: bass: group: The Black Crowes: LPs: Three Snakes & One Charm/Blackberry, Sho’ Nuff, Amorica.

Chart Toppers
May 1st.

1945 Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 Pretend - Nat King Cole
Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
I Believe - Frankie Laine
Mexican Joe - Jim Reeves

1961 Runaway - Del Shannon
Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
I’ve Told Every Little Star - Linda Scott
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
It’s Your Thing - The Isley Brothers
Hair - The Cowsills
Galveston - Glen Campbell

1977 Southern Nights - Glen Campbell
Hotel California - Eagles
When I Need You - Leo Sayer
She’s Pulling Me Back Again - Mickey Gilley

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Rhythm of the Night - DeBarge
Girls Night Out - The Judds


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

[B]All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-01-2007, 11:00 PM
122nd day of 2007 - 243 remaining.

Wednesday, May 2, 2007
BA BA BA BOOO DAY. :D

No, it’s not Halloween. It was on this day in Tacoma, Washington, in 1904*, that Harry Lillis Crosby was born; better known to us as Bing.

Bing Crosby went on to sing well over 4,000 songs during his impressive show biz career which spanned not only hit recordings, but movies, radio and TV, too. Crosby’s most successful tune? White Christmas (written by Irving Berlin).

Bandleader Paul Whiteman hired Crosby in 1926, along with singing partner, Al Rinker. With the addition of Harry Barris, the trio became The Rhythm Boys and gained quite a following. After leaving the Whiteman organization in 1930, Crosby sang for a brief while with Gus Arnheim’s band. In 1931, ‘Der Bingle’ recorded I Surrender, Dear. The popularity of that song landed Crosby on CBS radio and an unsurpassed solo career was underway. Over the next 30 years, Crosby’s baritone and easy manner sold more than 300,000,000 records.

The consummate golfer, Crosby was host of the annual Crosby Open held at Pebble Beach, Spyglass and, Cypress Point. With Crosby’s passing in 1977 -- on a golf course near Madrid, Spain -- the tournament changed names to the AT&T/Pebble Beach Open.

Bing was featured in over 60 movies, winning an Academy Award for Going My Way in 1944. Crosby won the Lifetime Achievement Grammy in 1962 and has been called the number one recording artist of all time.

Together, we can all croon in his honor: Ba Ba Ba Booo.

*According to Steven Lewis, in his WWW Bing Crosby page, “...During his lifetime, Bing claimed May 2, 1904 as his birthday. Bing had no birth certificate, and it was only after his death in 1977 that a Tacoma priest disclosed Roman Catholic Church baptismal records that revealed Bing’s actual birthdate as May 3, 1903.”

Events
May 2nd.

1853 - Franconi’s Hippodrome opened at Broadway and 23rd Street in New York City. The 4,000-seat facility opened in grand style for a hippodrome (an arena for a circus or games) with a chariot-and-ostrich race.

1885 - A new magazine for homemakers went on sale. You can still get it by mail or find it right next to the cash register at your favorite grocery store. The magazine is Good Housekeeping. It has our seal of approval.

1887 - Hannibal W. Goodwin of Newark, NJ applied for a patent for celluloid photographic film -- the stuff from which movies are shown.

1932 - NBC radio introduced an entertainer this night. The comic genius started working for a salary of $1,400 a week. His name: Jack Benny.

1938 - Ella Fitzgerald recorded one of her biggest hits, A-Tisket, A-Tasket, with Chick Webb’s band. Following Webb’s death, Fitzgerald took over the band for some three years.

1939 - Lou Gehrig established a new major-league baseball record as he played in his 2,130th game. ‘The Iron Horse’ had played in every Yankee game since June 1, 1925. (It would be 57 years until Cal Ripken, Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles would shatter that record in the summer of 1995.)

1941 - The Federal Communications Commission agreed to let regular scheduling of TV broadcasts by commercial TV stations begin on July 1, 1941. It was the start of what would become network television.

1953 - Dark Star defeated the heavily favored Native Dancer to win the Kentucky Derby. A $2 wager to win on this dark horse would have put some change in your pocket. Dark Star was a 25-1 long shot.

1954 - Stan ‘The Man’ Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals smacked five home runs in a twin bill against the New York Giants -- establishing a major-league record.

1960 - Harry Belafonte presented his second Carnegie Hall concert in New York City.

1964 - Northern Dancer, with jockey Bill Hartack, won the Kentucky Derby. Hartack had been on quite a win streak, completing four major victories in six months. The racing legend was atop Iron Liege, Venetian Way, Decidedly and Northern Dancer (not all at the same time, of course). Hartack then rode Northern Dancer to a win in the Preakness Stakes in Maryland. Interesting aside: In 1964 another jockey had ridden Northern Dancer three times then suddenly switched to Hill Rose for the Run for the Roses in Louisville. He was Willie Shoemaker.

1965 - Ed Sullivan had said he would not have this British rock group on his CBS-TV Sunday night show again. This night, however, Ed softened up -- and allowed Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones to make a second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. The Stones got satisfaction at last!

1970 - The ‘First Lady of Horse Racing’ (first to ride at a major track, first to win a major feature), Diane Crump, rode Fathom and made history as the first woman jockey to ride in the Kentucky Derby. She finished in 12th place.

1974 - Filming got underway for the motion picture, Jaws, in Martha’s Vineyard, MA. What was to be a 58-day shooting schedule for the film inspired by the Peter Benchley novel soon gave way to 120 days. Costs soared from what was to be a $3.5 million project to $8 million. The director, Steven Spielberg, was able to explain away the rise in costs and the picture did very well at the box office and, later, on video cassette.

1981 - Scottish singer Sheena Easton made it to the top spot on the pop music charts for her first -- and only -- time. Morning Train (Nine to Five) knocked Kiss on My List, by Daryl Hall and John Oates, out of the top of the music charts. Morning Train pulled into the top spot for a two-week stay. Easton had been an actress, appearing as a singer in the 1980 BBC TV documentary, The Big Time; and this time she made it to the big time, winning the 1981 Best New Artist Grammy Award. On U.S. TV, she is remembered as Sonny Crockett’s wife in five episodes of Miami Vice in the 1980s and for singing the title song in the James Bond flick, For Your Eyes Only. Easton scored 14 hits on the charts between 1981 and 1991. Seven of those hits made it to the top ten. The Lover in Me in 1988 was the closest she ever came to having another number one hit. It stopped climbing at number two. Once again, the countdown continues...

1985 - The General Motors X-Cars rolled off the assembly line in Detroit, MI for the final time on this day. The cars were a dismal failure, despite being a hit in the beginning. The X-Cars were subject to massive recalls which cost G.M. many millions of dollars.

1986 - The photo essay, A Day in the Life of America, began this day as two hundred photojournalists covered the USA to take 350,000 pictures. For publication of the beautiful coffee table book, only 350 pictures were selected. Several spin-off books such as A Day in the Life of Hawaii, etc. have joined it on coffee tables throughout the world.

Birthdays
May 2nd.

1729 - Catherine the Great (Catherine II) (Ekaterina Alekseevna)
Russian leader [1762-1796]; died in 1796

1837 - Henry M. (Martyn) Robert
U.S. Army General; author: Robert’s Rules of Order, the standard for parliamentary procedure; died May 11, 1923

1887 - Vernon Castle
dancer, actor: The Whirl of Life; died Feb 15, 1918

1895 - Lorenz Hart
composer, lyricist: half of famous team of (Richard) Rodgers & Hart: I Wish I Were in Love Again, Where or When, With a Song in My Heart, I Could Write a Book, Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered, There’s a Small Hotel, Little Girl Blue, The Lady is a Tramp, Blue Moon, My Funny Valentine; died Nov 22, 1943

1902 - Brian Aherne
actor: A Night to Remember, Titanic, The Best of Everything, The Waltz King; died Feb 10, 1986

1903 - Benjamin Spock
baby doctor, author: The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care; died Mar 15, 1998

1904 - Bing (Harry Lillis) Crosby
‘der Bingle’: Grammy Award-winning [Lifetime Achievement Grammy: 1962] crooner: White Christmas, I Surrender, Dear, Where the Blue of the Night [Meets the Gold of the Day]; about 2600 records, 120 LPs sold estimated 400 million ; Academy Award-winning actor: Going My Way [1944]; Big Broadcast of 1932; over 60 films; died Oct 14, 1977; see Ba Ba Ba Booo Day [above]

1907 - Pinky Lee (Pincus Leff)
entertainer: burlesque; The Pinky Lee Show [early ’50s TV]; died Apr 3, 1993

1913 - Nigel Patrick (Wemyss)
actor: The Jack of Diamonds, Raintree County, Johnny Nobody, The Mackintosh Man; director: How to Murder a Rich Uncle, Johnny Nobody; writer: The Jack of Diamonds; died Sep 21, 1981

1921 - Satyajit Ray
Academy Award-winning [life-time achievement award] director: Pather Panchali, Aparajito, The World of Apu, Distant Thunder, The Adversary, Devi; died Apr 23, 1992

1924 - Theodore Bikel
singer, actor: Fiddler on the Roof, The Sound of Music, My Fair Lady, The African Queen, The Pride and the Passion, The Defiant Ones, The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming

1929 - Link Wray (Frederick Lincoln Wray Jr.)
musician: guitarist, composer: Link Wray and His Ray Men: Rumble, Raw Hide, Jack the Ripper; died Nov 5, 2005

1932 - Françoise Fabian (Michele Cortes De Leon y Fabianera)
actress: Reunion, The French Woman, Dressmaker, My Night at Maud’s

1936 - Engelbert Humperdinck (Arnold George Dorsey)
singer: After The Lovin’, Release Me, There Goes My Everything, The Last Waltz, A Man Without Love, Winter World of Love, Les Bicyclettes de Belsize

1937 - Lorenzo Music
actor: voice of Garfield, Carlton the Doorman [in Rhoda]; Emmy Award-winning producer: Carlton, Your Doorman [5/21/80]; died Aug 4, 2001

1939 - Gates (William James) Brown
baseball: Detroit Tigers [World Series: 1968]

1941 - Clay (Palmer) Carroll
‘Hawk’: baseball: pitcher: Milwaukee Braves, Atlanta Braves, Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1970, 1972, 1975/all-star: 1971, 1972], Chicago White Sox, SL Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates

1943 - Mickey (Lee Oddis) Bass III
jazz composer, musician: group: New York Powerhouse Ensemble

1945 - Bianca Jagger
actress, model; Mick Jagger’s ex

1945 - Goldy McJohn
musician: organ: group: Steppenwolf: Born to be Wild, The Pusher, Magic Carpet Ride, Rock Me

1946 - Leslie Gore
singer: It’s My Party, Judy’s Turn to Cry, She’s a Fool, You Don’t Own Me, Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows, California Nights; actress: Girls on the Beach, Ski Party, The T.A.M.I. Show

1947 - Gerald Irons
football: Oakland Raiders, Cleveland Browns

1948 - Larry Gatlin
musician, Grammy Award-winning country singer: Broken Lady [1976], I Don’t Wanna Cry, Houston (I’m Comin’ to See You), Love is Just a Game, Take Somebody with Me When I Fall, Statues Without Hearts, All the Gold in California

1950 - Lou Gramm
singer: groups: Black Sheep, Foreigner: Feels like the First Time, Cold as Ice, Long Long Way from Home, Double Vision, Hot Blooded, Blue Morning Blue Day, Urgent, Waiting for a Girl like You, I Want to Know What Love Is, That was Yesterday.

Chart Toppers
May 2nd.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Day by Day - Frank Sinatra
All Through the Day - Perry Como
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Young at Heart - Frank Sinatra
Make Love to Me - Jo Stafford
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Soldier Boy - The Shirelles
Stranger on the Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk
Charlie’s Shoes - Billy Walker

1970 ABC - The Jackson 5
American Woman/No Sugar Tonight - The Guess Who
Love or Let Me Be Lonely - The Friends of Distinction
My Woman My Woman, My Wife - Marty Robbins

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
If I Can’t Have You - Yvonne Elliman
Can’t Smile Without You - Barry Manilow
Every Time Two Fools Collide - Kenny Rogers & Dottie West

1986 Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Addicted to Love - Robert Palmer
West End Girls - Pet Shop Boys
Now and Forever (You and Me) - Anne Murray


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

[B]All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-02-2007, 11:00 PM
123rd day of 2007 - 242 remaining.

Thursday, May 3, 2007
NPR DAY. :)

It was on this day in 1971 that National Public Radio, the U.S. national, non-commercial radio network, was born.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting financed National Public Radio so we could, once again, have the thrill of live radio. Listeners turned to NPR for cultural programs, news, information and quality entertainment programming. Award-winning programming such as All Things Considered, NPR’s premier newsmagazine, presented uninterrupted, informative reports on business, economics and the world, in general -- and still does.

NPR’s most popular shows also include: Talk of the Nation, fascinating and thought-provoking discussions on the day’s issues and what’s behind the headlines; NPR’s Performance Today, a daily portrait of what’s happening in the world of classical music; and Car Talk, starring America’s funniest auto mechanics, the M.I.T. educated grease monkeys, Tom and Ray Magliozzi. NPR also produces and distributes some of America’s finest jazz programming.

National Public Radio was formed to educate, entertain and inform in ways that were not available elsewhere. It was and is the audience’s alternative to commercial radio. Today, NPR’s satellite-based radio network of almost 600 member stations broadcasts NPR-produced or acquired programs to 13-million listeners in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam.

Events
May 3rd.


1810 - Lord Byron swam the Hellespont* this day. Pretty darn fast, too. It took just an hour and 10 minutes to do it, by Jove! *The Hellespont is now know as the Dardanelles. It is a 40 mi. (64 km) long, 1-5 mi. (1.6-8 km) wide strait between European and Asian Turkey, connecting the Aegean Sea with the Sea of Marmara.

1927 - Francis E.J. Wilde of Meadowmere Park, NY patented the electric sign flasher. It said , “Eat Here, Get Gas” -- Dunno, but probably close.

1933 - The United States Mint was under the direction of a woman for the first time. Mrs. Nellie Ross assumed command.

1938 - Viewers of W2XBS-TV (now WCBS-TV) watched the first book review show. No word as to how many remained awake through the whole thing...

1939 - Belly up to the bar for this one. Beer Barrel Polka, one of the standards of American music, was recorded by The Andrews Sisters for Decca Records. Patti, Maxine and LaVerne turned this song into a giant hit.

1941 - Jockey Eddie Arcaro rode Whirlaway to the winner’s circle in the Kentucky Derby. He was on his way to winning racing’s Triple Crown (the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, KY, the Preakness in Baltimore, MD and the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park in New York).

1944 - Dr. Robert Woodward and Dr. William Doering produced the first synthetic quinine at Harvard University. Quinine -- like in quinine water. (Hiccup!)

1952 - The first airplane to land at the geographic location of the North Pole did so on this day. The crew may have missed the mark, as they saw no tall barber pole or little red house, no sign of elves and no Santa Claus. There was a report that there was loud, bellowing laughter from not far off and a few reindeer were seen frolicking about, however...

1956 - Most Happy Fella, a musical by Frank Loesser, opened at the Imperial Theatre in New York City. The show, an adaptation of They Knew What They Wanted by Sidney Howard, ran for 676 performances on Broadway. Critics called the show a masterpiece, thanks to the outstanding performances of Robert Weede and Jo Sullivan. One must not forget Loesser’s music, which included such classics as Standing on the Corner, I Like Everybody, Joey, Joey, Joey, Big Acquaintance and Don’t Cry.

1957 - Brooklyn Dodgers’ owner, Walter O’Malley, agreed to move the team from Flatbush to sunny Los Angeles. Initially, only exhibition games were held at the L.A. Coliseum. O’Malley said that a new stadium would have to be constructed before the Dodgers would even consider a move to Southern California. He was right, so Dodger Stadium (in Chavez Ravine) was constructed with private investor money.

1960 - The play, The Fantasticks, opened at the Sullivan Playhouse in New York City. It would later become the longest-running off-Broadway play. Soon It’s Gonna Rain was one of the big hit tunes from the production. The show was the equivalent of London’s long-running play, The Mousetrap. Unfortunately, though the British were familiar with The Mousetrap and might have known of the similarities between the two plays, when The Fantasticks opened in London, it failed miserably and closed after only 44 performances.

1986 - Horse racing legend Bill Shoemaker became the oldest jockey to win the the Kentucky Derby. ‘The Shoe’ was atop Ferdinand for the win. Shoemaker was 54 years old. It had been 32 years since Shoemaker’s first Derby victory back in 1955.

Birthdays
May 3rd.

1469 - Niccolo Machiavelli
philosopher, writer: The Prince; died June 22, 1527

1907 - Earl Wilson
entertainment writer, columnist: “JFK is the sexiest, swingingest President of the century...”; died Jan 16, 1987

1910 - Norman Lewis Corwin
radio writer/director/producer: We Hold These Truths, On a Note of Triumph, Columbia Workshop, Twenty-Six by Corwin, An American in England, Columbia Presents Corwin; NPR series: More By Corwin; professor: Univ. of Southern California

1912 - Virgil Fox
organ virtuoso: credited for bringing the organ “to the forefront among classical concert instruments.”; died Oct 25, 1980

1919 - Pete Seeger
folk singer: groups: Almanac Singers, Weavers; solo: Little Boxes; songwriter: Where Have All the Flowers Gone?, Turn, Turn, Turn, co-wrote: If I Had a Hammer; social, civil and political activist

1919 - Betty Comden (Cohen)
screenwriter [w/Adolph Green]: It’s Always Fair Weather, On the Town, Singin’ in the Rain; actress: Greenwich Village, That Was the Week That Was, Garbo Talks, Slaves of New York; died Nov 23, 2006

1921 - Joe Ames
singer: group: The Ames Brothers: Undecided, The Naughty Lady of Shady Lane, Ragmop, Tammy

1921 - Sugar Ray Robinson
International Boxing Hall of Fame middleweight champ: only boxer to win world title at one weight five times; died Apr 12, 1989

1926 - Jimmy Cleveland
composer, musician: trombone: group: Jay & Kai Octet, played with Quincy Jones, Thelonious Monk

1928 - Dave Dudley (Pedruska)
country singer: groups: The Dave Dudley Trio, The Country Gentlemen, The Roadrunners: Six Days On the Road, Mad, Truck Drivin’ Sun of a Gun, Vietnam Blues; died Dec 22, 2003

1931 - Joe Layton (Lichtman)
choreographer: Thoroughly Modern Millie; director: Richard Pryor Live on the Sunset Strip, The Littlest Angel, Androcles and the Lion; died May 5, 1994

1933 - James Brown
The Godfather of Soul: singer: Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag, Please, Please, Please, I Got You (I Feel Good), It’s A Man’s Man’s Man’s World, Living in America; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer [1986]; died Dec 25, 2006

1937 - Frankie Valli (Francis Castellucio)
falsetto singer: group: The Four Seasons: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Rag Doll, Let’s Hang On; solo: Can’t Take My Eyes Off You, My Eyes Adored You, Swearin’ to God, December ’63 [Oh What a Night], Grease

1944 - Pete Staples
musician: bass: group: The Troggs: Wild Thing, I Can’t Control Myself, With a Girl like You, Give It to Me, Any Way that You Want Me, Night of the Long Grass, Hi Hi Hazel, Love is All Around, Little Girl

1946 - Davey Lopes
baseball: LA Dodgers [World Series: 1974, 1977, 1978, 1981/all-star: 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981], Oakland Athletics, Chicago Cubs, Houston Astros

1947 - Doug Henning
magician/illusionist: The World of Magic [TV], The Magic Show ; died Feb 8, 2000

1948 - Garfield Heard
basketball: Univ. of Oklahoma, Phoenix Suns; Asst Coach: Philadelphia 76ers

1950 - Mary Hopkin
singer: Those Were the Days, Goodbye, Temma Harbour, If You Love Me

1951 - Christopher Cross (Geppert)
Oscar-winning singer: Arthur’s Theme (Best that You can Do); 5 Grammy Awards [1981]; singer, songwriter: Sailing, Ride like the Wind, Say You’ll be Mine, Think of Laura

1953 - Bruce Hall
musician: bass: group: REO Speedwagon: Keep on Loving You, Take It on the Run, Keep the Fire Burnin’, Can’t Fight This Feeling

1959 - Dave Ball
musician: keyboards: group: Soft Cell: Tainted Love, Bed Sitter, Torch, What.

Chart Toppers
May 3rd.

1947 Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Mam’selle - Art Lund
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Tennessee Ernie Ford
Dance with Me Henry (Wallflower) - Georgia Gibbs
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 I Will Follow Him - Little Peggy March
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
Puff the Magic Dragon - Peter, Paul & Mary
Lonesome 7-7203 - Hawkshaw Hawkins

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean
Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5
Empty Arms - Sonny James

1979 Heart of Glass - Blondie
Reunited - Peaches & Herb
Stumblin’ In - Suzi Quatro & Chris Norman
Where Do I Put Her Memory - Charley Pride

1987 (I Just) Died in Your Arms - Cutting Crew
Looking for a New Love - Jody Watley
La Isla Bonita - Madonna
Don’t Go to Strangers - T. Graham Brown


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

[B]All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-03-2007, 11:00 PM
124th day of 2007 - 241 remaining.

Friday, May 4, 2007
FUNNY FACE DAY. :) :)

Edda Kathleen Hepburn van Heemstra was born on this day in Brussels, Belgium in the year 1929. This is quite a large name for the gamine-faced, petite charmer we knew as Audrey Hepburn. At the young age of thirteen, she had already developed the need to provide relief to the human suffering surrounding her and enlisted in the Dutch underground in their fight against the Nazi occupation of Holland.

Nine years later, performing on the Broadway stage, critics found her to be charming, honest and talented in the title role of Gigi. She achieved stardom a mere two years later with her Academy award-winning performance in Roman Holiday. Audrey married Mel Ferrer on September 25, 1954 and co-starred with him and Henry Fonda in War and Peace. A year later, Funny Face premiered with Fred Astaire as her co-star. (The title role stuck to her like glue.) Love in the Afternoon opened the same year with Gary Cooper sharing the spotlight.

The seemingly fragile actress -- she fainted at the premiere of Farewell to Arms when the scene showed a difficult childbirth; and fell off a horse, fracturing several vertebrae while filming The Unforgiven -- received four Oscar nominations for Best Actress and made no less than two dozen movies in her film career including Breakfast at Tiffany’s and The Children’s Hour in 1961, Charade [1963], My Fair Lady [1964] (Marni Nixon dubbed her singing), Two for the Road in 1967 and Robin and Marian with Sean Connery [1976]. Both stars received France’s Commander of Arts and Letters Award in 1987.

In later years, the diminutive star turned her attentions once more to affairs of the world, serving as spokesperson for the United Nations Children’s Fund.

The world lost a great benefactor and a beautiful funny face when Audrey Hepburn died January 20, 1993.

Events
May 4th.

1886 - The first practical phonograph, better known as the gramophone, was patented.

1899 - Manuel rushed to the finish line ahead of four others to win the Kentucky Derby.

1905 - Belmont Park race track opened on Long Island, New York. Race King and Sysonby finished in a dead heat in the day’s feature race.

1920 - The Symphony Society of New York presented a concert at the Paris Opera House. It was the first American orchestra to make a European tour.

1925 - The Terris-Dundee boxing match was the final event held at the old Madison Square Garden in New York City. Five different sites have been named Madison Square Garden over the years.

1932 - Public Enemy Number One, Al Capone, was jailed in the Atlanta Penitentiary for tax evasion.

1945 - June Christy sang with the Stan Kenton band on one of the most famous of all big band hits, Tampico. The tune was waxed as Capitol record number 202.

1956 - Gene Vincent and his group, The Blue Caps, recorded Be-Bop-A Lula for Capitol Records in Los Angeles. Interesting note: Vincent had written the tune only three days before he auditioned in a record company talent search that won him first place. The record was rush-released just two days later and became a rock and roll classic. Vincent recorded two other charted songs in 1957 and 1958: Lotta Lovin’ and Dance to the Bop.

1957 - This was a tough day at the Kentucky Derby for Willie Shoemaker. He misjudged the finish line while aboard Gallant Man. In the winner’s circle at Churchill Downs was, instead, Iron Liege, ridden by jockey Bill Hartack. Gallant Man and Shoemaker did win the Belmont Stakes a few weeks later.

1964 - The Pulitzer Prize jury failed for the first time to award winners in the areas of fiction, drama and music. Hey some days are like that...

1964 - Another World premiered on NBC-TV. The soap opera dramatized the story of two families: the Randolphs and the Matthews.

1970 - This was a sad day in U.S. history and for human rights as four Kent State University students were shot down by National Guard members during an anti-Vietnam War demonstration. Memorial services are held annually for Allison Krause, Sandra Lee Scheuer, Jeffrey Glenn Miller and William K. Schroeder on the Kent, Ohio campus. They are not forgotten.

1977 - Former President Richard M. Nixon spoke with interviewer, David Frost in the first of four television interviews. Nixon had been in seclusion for the two previous months.

1985 - Spend A Buck posted the third fastest winning time in the Kentucky Derby by running the 1-1/4 mile track at Churchill Downs in 2 minutes and 1/8 second. Only Secretariat (1973) and Northern Dancer (1964) had been faster.

1985 - The famed Apollo Theatre, once the showcase for the nation’s top black performers, reopened after a renovation that cost $10.4 million. The landmark building on West 125th Street in New York was the first place The Beatles wanted to see on their initial visit to the United States. Ed Sullivan used to frequent the Apollo in search of new talent for his CBS show.

Birthdays
May 4th.

1796 - Horace Mann
educator: the father of public education in the U.S.; founder of Westfield, MA State College; author, editor: Common School Journal; died Aug 2, 1859

1820 - Julia Tyler (Gardiner)
wife of 10th U.S. President John Tyler; died July 10, 1889

1889 - Cardinal (Francis) Joseph Spellman
Roman Catholic clergy leader; died Dec 2, 1967

1909 - Howard Da Silva (Silverblatt)
actor: The Lost Weekend, The Great Gatsby, Mommie Dearest, Abe Lincoln in Illinois; died Feb 16, 1986

1923 - Ed ‘Cass’ Cassidy
musician: drums: groups: New Jazz Trio, Taj Mahal, Spirit: I Got a Line on You, Nature’s Way

1928 - Maynard Ferguson
musician: trumpet, trombone, other horns; bandleader: LPs: Primal Scream, Conquistador, New Vintage, Carnival, Hot, It’s My Time, Hollywood, High Voltage

1928 - Betsy Rawls
golf champion: first of two players to win U.S. Open four times [1951, 1953, 1957, 1960]; also two-time LPGA Champion [1959, 1969]

1929 - Audrey Hepburn
actress; died Jan 20, 1993; see Funny Face Day [above]

1930 - Roberta Peters (Peterman)
opera soprano: Metropolitan Opera; Rigoletto [Gilda], Il Barbiere di Siviglia [Rosina]; films: City Hall, Tonight We Sing; Jewish Cultural Achievement Awards in Performing Arts [1997]

1932 - Harlon Hill
football: Florence State Teachers College [All-American], Chicago Bears, Pittsburgh Steelers, Detroit Lions; Harlon Hill Trophy [to player of the year in NCAA Div. II] named after him

1936 - Manuel Benítez Pérez
‘El Cordobes’: Spanish bullfighter

1941 - George F. Will
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist: syndicated in some 460 papers, Newsweek; Washington editor: National Review; contributing analyst: ABC-TV News: World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, This Week

1942 - Nickolas Ashford
producer, songwriter: duo: Ashford & Simpson: Let’s Go Get Stoned, I’m Every Woman, Ain’t No Mountain High Enough, Ain’t Nothing like the Real Thing, You’re All I Need to Get By, Reach Out and Touch Somebody’s Hand

1943 - Ronnie Bond (Ronald Bulls)
musician: drums: group: The Troggs: Wild Thing, With a Girl like You, I Can’t Control Myself, Any Way that You Want Me, Give It to Me, Night of the Long Grass, Hi Hi Hazel, Love is All Around, Little Girl

1944 - Fred (Frederic) Stanfield
hockey: NHL: Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins, Minnesota North Stars, Buffalo Sabres

1951 - Jackie (Sigmund) Jackson
singer: group: The Jackson Five, The Jacksons: I Want You Back, ABC, The Love You Save, I’ll Be There, Enjoy Yourself, Shake Your Body, State of Shock

1954 - Pia Zadora
actress: Hairspray, Voyage of the Rock Aliens, Pajama Tops, The Lonely Lady, Fakeout, Butterfly, Naked Gun 33 1/3

1955 - Danny Brubeck
drummer: Two Generations of Brubeck, In Your Own Sweet Way, The Duke; Dave Brubeck’s son

1959 - Randy Travis (Randy Bruce Traywick)
singer: Forever and Ever Amen, On the Other Hand, Diggin’ Up Bones, Always and Forever

1961 - Jay Aston
singer: group: Bucks Fizz: Making Your Mind Up, Land of Make Believe, My Camera Never Lies, Now Those Days are Gone, If You Can’t Stand the Heat

1979 - Lance Bass
singer: group: ’N Sync: I Want You Back, Tearin’ Up My Heart, Merry Christmas, Happy Holiday, God Must Have Spent A Little More Time On You, I Drive Myself Crazy, Music Of My Heart.

Chart Toppers
May 4th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
The Dickey Bird Song - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn Hughes)
Manana - Peggy Lee
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
Moonglow and Theme from ’Picnic’ - Morris Stoloff
Standing on the Corner - The Four Lads
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Hello Dolly! - Louis Armstrong
Bits and Pieces - The Dave Clark Five
My Heart Skips a Beat - Buck Owens

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Betcha By Golly, Wow - The Stylistics
Chantilly Lace - Jerry Lee Lewis

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
Lost in Love - Air Supply
Are You on the Road to Lovin’ Me Again - Debby Boone

1988 Where Do Broken Hearts Go - Whitney Houston
Wishing Well - Terence Trent D’Arby
Angel - Aerosmith
It’s Such a Small World - Rodney Crowell & Rosanne Cash


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-04-2007, 11:00 PM
125th day of 2007 - 240 remaining.

Saturday, May 5, 2007
CINCO DE MAYO DAY. :)

If you are Mexican or of Mexican descent or just like a party, today, Cinco de Mayo, is the day to celebrate the anniversary of the 1862 Battle of Puebla. General Ignacio Zaragoza’s troops were outnumbered three to one as they battled the invading French army. They may have been outnumbered but they had the will to win. The Mexican forces defeated Napoleon III’s army and Puebla stood.

Now stand up and join that Cinco de Mayo parade, attend the festival, enjoy the salsa music and the salsa dip with your Margarita. We all salute General Ignacio Zaragoza and his brave contingent.

Events
May 5th.


1809 - Who was the first woman to be issued a U.S. patent? It was Mary Kies of South Killingly, CT. She was granted a patent for the rights to a technique for weaving straw with silk and thread.

1847 - The American Medical Association was organized in Philadelphia, PA. Go sit in your doctor’s waiting room to celebrate...

1891 - New York City was the site of the dedication of a building called the Music Hall. It was quite a celebration. A festival was held for five days, featuring guest conductor Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky. The structure is not called the Music Hall anymore. It’s called Carnegie Hall, named in honor of Andrew Carnegie.

1893 - The worst economic crisis in U.S. history (to that time) happened on this day. Stock prices plummeted, major railroads went into receivership, 15,000 businesses went bankrupt and 15 to 20 percent of the work force was unemployed. Within seven months, over 600 banks had closed.

1900 - The Billboard, a magazine for the music and entertainment industries, began weekly publication after six years as a monthly. The name was later shortened to Billboard.

1904 - Cy Young of the Boston Red Sox tossed a perfect game against the Philadelphia Americans. The final score was 3-0. No player on the Philadelphia team reached first base. It was the third perfect game ever thrown in the big leagues.

1935 - The radio program, Rhythm at Eight, made its debut. The star of the show was 24-year-old Ethel Merman. Though Merman would become a legend years later, she didn’t fare so well on radio. Her show was taken off the air after 13 weeks and Miss Merman returned to her first love, Broadway.

1936 - Edward Ravenscroft of Glencoe, IL was sitting at his kitchen table, admiring the piece of mail he had just received from the U.S. Patent Office. It was a patent for the screw-on bottle cap with the pour lip. For those who have always wondered, but maybe were a little shy to ask, now you know...

1955 - The musical, Damn Yankees, opened in New York City for a successful run of 1,019 performances. The show at the 42nd Street Theatre mixed both baseball and ballet. It is an adaptation of the book, The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant. Gwen Verdon starred in the role of Lola. Whatever Lola wants Lola gets including the Tony for Best Actress in a musical for her performance.

1956 - The first runner to break the four-minute mile within the United States was Jim Bailey and he did it on this day. He was clocked at a speedy 3:58.6 in Los Angeles, CA.

1966 - Willie Mays hit home run number 512 of his career. The San Francisco Giants’ superstar broke Mel Ott’s record and became the greatest home run hitter in the National League to that time.

1973 - 56,800 fans paid $309,000 to see Led Zeppelin at Tampa Stadium. This was the largest, paid crowd ever assembled in the U.S. to see a single musical act. The concert topped The Beatles 55,000-person audience at Shea Stadium in New York ($301,000).

1978 - Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds smacked his 3,000th major-league hit. Not many years later, ‘Charlie Hustle’ would break Ty Cobb’s career record of 4,191 hits.

1985 - The first husband and wife team to win a major marathon, Ken and Lisa Maratin, won over $50,000 for their first-place finishes in the Pittsburgh Marathon. Interesting also, because they had never run in the same race before.

1988 - Eugene Antonio Marino became the first black Roman Catholic Bishop in the United States. He was installed as the archbishop of Atlanta, Georgia.

1994 - Four strokes with a cane on the buttocks was the punishment for Michael Fay. Fay, an American teenager, was charged along with eight others for vandalism in Singapore. He, Stephen Freehill, two Malaysian juveniles, and Shiu Chi Ho from Singapore went to trial. Freehill’s crime was reduced to mishief. He was not caned and served no jail term. Shiu served about four months in jail and received six cane strokes. Fay’s original sentence was four months in jail, a large fine and six caning strokes. With the enormous amount of media coverage in the United States and the intervention of U.S. President Clinton, this was reduced to approximately 3 months in jail, and four strokes. Although, in the U.S., this is considered unusual and harsh punishment for vandalism, U.S. public support for the whacking was overwhelming (running 90% in Fay’s home town of Dayton, Ohio).

Birthdays
May 5th.

1818 - Karl Marx
socialist writer: Das Kapital, The Communist Manifesto; founder of communism; died Mar 14, 1883

1867 - Nelly Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman)
courageous journalist, writing about taboo subjects of her time: divorce, poverty, capital punishment, insanity; women’s rights advocate; died Jan 27, 1922

1890 - Christopher Morley
writer: New York Evening Post, Saturday Review; novelist: Kitty Foyle, Thunder on the Left; died March 28, 1957

1913 - Duane Carter
auto racer: Sprint Car Hall of Famer; died Mar 8, 1993

1914 - Tyrone Power (Tyrone Edmund Power Jr.)
actor: Tom Brown of Culver, The Mark of Zorro, Blood and Sand, This Above All, The Eddie Duchin Story, The Long Gray Line, Witness for the Prosecution; died Nov 15, 1958

1915 - Alice Faye (Alice Jeanne Leppert)
actress: In Old Chicago, Lillian Russell, Rose of Washington Square, Tin Pan Alley, State Fair; died May 9, 1998

1926 - Ann B. (Bradford) Davis
Emmy Award-winning actress: The Bob Cummings Show [1957, 1958-59]; The Brady Bunch, Lover Come Back, A Very Brady Christmas

1927 - Art Pollard
auto racer: killed during Indianapolis 500 time trials May 12, 1973

1927 - Pat Carroll
Emmy Award-winning comedienne, actress: Caesar’s Hour [1956], The Ted Knight Show, With Six You Get Eggroll, Brothers O’Toole

1934 - ‘Ace’ Cannon (John Henry Cannon Jr.)
saxophonist: Tuff, Blues [Stay Away From Me]

1935 - Jose (Antonio Rodriguez) Pagan
baseball: SF Giants [World Series: 1967], Pittsburgh Pirates[World Series: 1971], Philadelphia Phillies

1937 - Sandy Baron (Sanford Beresofsky)
comedian, actor: Leprechaun 2, If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium, Motorama, Birdy; died Jan 21, 2001

1938 - Michael Murphy
actor: Clean Slate, Batman Returns, The Year of Living Dangerously, Salvador, Manhattan, An Unmarried Woman, Nashville, Two Marriages, Tanner ’88, The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Brewster McCloud, Countdown, Double Trouble, Hard Copy

1940 - Lance Henriksen
actor: Powder, Felony, Dead Man, Baja, Spitfire, Color of Night, The Criminal Mind, Delta Heat, Alien 3, The Last Samurai, Johnny Handsome, Near Dark, The Terminator, The Right Stuff, Prince of the City, Damien: Omen 2, Dog Day Afternoon

1941 - Tommy (Vann) Helms
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [all-star: 1967, 1968/World Series: 1970], Houston Astros, Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Red Sox

1942 - Tammy Wynette (Virginia Wynette Pugh)
Grammy Award-winning country singer: I Don’t Wanna Play House [1967], Stand By Your Man [1969]; D-I-V-O-R-C-E, Near You, Apartment #9; died Apr 6, 1998

1943 - Michael Palin
comedian, actor: Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Life of Brian, Brazil, A Fish Called Wanda, American Friends

1944 - Jean-Pierre Léaud
actor: The 400 Blows, Stolen Kisses, Love on the Run, LA Vie de Boheme, 36 Fillete, Last Tango in Paris

1944 - Roger Rees
actor: M.A.N.T.I.S., Cheers, Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Charles & Diana: A Palace Divided, If Looks Could Kill, Mountains of the Moon, Star 80, The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby

1947 - Larry (Eugene) Hisle
baseball: Philadelphia Phillies, Minnesota Twins [all-star: 1977], Milwaukee Brewers [all-star: 1978]

1948 - John Hummer
basketball: Princeton Univ., LA Clippers

1948 - Bill Ward
musician: drums: group: Black Sabbath: Paranoid

1951 - Nick Bebout
football: Seattle Seahawks

1957 - Richard E. Grant
actor: Jack and Sarah, Cold Light of Day, Ready to Wear, L.A. Story, The Age of Innocence, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Hudson Hawk, Henry and June

1959 - Ian McCulloch
singer, musician: guitar: group: Echo & The Bunnymen: The Cutter, Silver, Seven Seas, Killing Moon, Rescue, Bring on the Dancing Horses

1962 - Gary Daly
singer: group: China Crisis: Wishful Thinking

1962 - Kevin Mooney
musician: bass: group: Adam & The Ants: LPs: King’s of the Wild Frontier, Prince Charming

1973 - Tina Yothers
actress: Family Ties, Laker Girls, Spunk: The Tonya Harding Story.

Chart Toppers
May 5th.


1949 Cruising Down the River - The Blue Barron Orchestra (vocal: ensemble)
Forever and Ever - Perry Como
Again - Doris Day
Lovesick Blues - Hank Williams

1957 All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
School Day - Chuck Berry
A White Sport Coat (And a Pink Carnation) - Marty Robbins
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter - Herman’s Hermits
I Know a Place - Petula Clark
I’ll Never Find Another You - The Seekers
This is It - Jim Reeves

1973 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree - Dawn featuring Tony
Orlando
The Cisco Kid - War
Little Willy - The Sweet
Behind Closed Doors - Charlie Rich

1981 Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Being with You - Smokey Robinson
Rest Your Love on Me - Conway Twitty

1989 Like a Prayer - Madonna
I’ll Be There for You - Bon Jovi
She Drives Me Crazy - Fine Young Cannibals
Young Love - The Judds


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-05-2007, 11:00 PM
126th day of 2007 - 239 remaining.

Sunday, May 6, 2007
VALENTINO DAY. :)

Rodolpho Alfonso Rafaello Pietro Filiberto Guglielmi Di Valentina D’Antonguolla was born this day in 1895. How he got past the name selection process is anyone’s guess!

Rudolph Valentino became a national phenomenon and a star of unprecedented sensual attraction to women, starring in these memorable movies: The Big Little Person (1918), The Delicious Little Devil (1919) for which he earned $100 per week, Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921), Blood and Sand (1922), and his most famous, Sheik (1921), which he said he hated.

He also disliked Paramount Studios, saying he was dissatisfied with the photography, management and direction; that they did not live up to his artistic ambitions. However, by 1924, Valentino was in the top ten of box office stars. Monsieur Beaucaire, starring Valentino, was released that same year. A year later he was at the very top of the box office star list.

The leading man was just 31 years old when a perforated ulcer took his life. Tens of thousands came to view their screen idol and movie studios closed during the funeral. On the anniversary of his death, the ‘Lady in Black’ made her first of many annual appearances at his burial site. The mystery lady was never identified. Even in death, Rudolph Valentino was a superstar.

Events
May 6th.


1835 - James Gordon Bennett published the New York Herald for the first time.

1851 - Dr. John Gorrie of Apalachicola FL, patented the mechanical refrigerator.

1851 - Linus Yale of Newport, NY became well known for his patent of the clock-type lock. If the name Yale sounds familiar, it should. Yale locks are among the top brands of security devices sold today.

1889 - The Universal Exposition opened in Paris, France, marking the dedication of the recently constructed Eiffel Tower. The exposition also was known for the display of the first automobile in Paris. No, it wasn’t a French auto. It was a German Mercedes-Benz, one of the world’s most luxurious automobiles.

1915 - Babe Ruth hit his first major-league home run. He was playing for the Boston Red Sox at the time. ‘The Sultan of Swat’ went on to smash 714 round-trippers before he retired, as a New York Yankee, in 1935.

1937 - A student of history, a broadcaster or anyone interested in news coverage, will remember this day and the words of NBC radio’s Herbert Morrison. “Oh, the humanity!” Morrison’s emotion-filled historic broadcast of the explosion of the dirigible, Hindenburg at Lakehurst, NJ, became the first recorded coast-to-coast broadcast as it was carried on both the NBC Red and NBC Blue networks from New York City.

1941 - Joseph Stalin became the premier of Russia.

1946 - The New York Yankees announced that they were to be the first major-league baseball team to travel by airplane during the entire 1946 season.

1954 - Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile in Oxford, England. He was timed at 3:59.4 seconds. Bannister told reporters that a mile run of 3:30 would be run before 1999. His prediction did not come true although runners are definitely getting closer. The record time of 3:43.13 by Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco stands as the world men’s outdoor mile record since July 7, 1999. Any challengers?

1957 - Senator John Fitzgerald Kennedy of Massachusetts was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage.

1959 - The Pablo Picasso painting of a Dutch girl was sold for $154,000 in London. It was the highest price paid to that time for a painting by a living artist.

1980 - NBC came to terms with its superstar, Johnny Carson, on this day. Johnny signed a new three-year contract for approximately $5-million a year. Carson also reduced his Tonight Show to one hour from ninety minutes and cut his work week to four nights. Plus, he got billing in the show’s title, as it became The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson.

1982 - Gaylord Perry of the Seattle Mariners became the 15th pitcher in the major leagues to win 300 career victories. Perry, known for his spitball as well as a variety of other pitches, led the Mariners past the New York Yankees 7-3.

1986 - From the What an Ungrateful Thing to Do, Joan file: Comedienne, Joan Rivers, put her foot in her mouth by announcing to the world that she was leaving The Tonight Show as permanent guest host to begin her own late-night gabfest on the new FOX TV Network.

Birthdays
May 6th.

1758 - Maximilian Robespierre
French revolutionary; executed [guillotine] July 28, 1794

1856 - Sigmund Freud
psychiatrist, originated psychoanalysis; died Sep 23, 1939

1856 - Robert E. Peary
explorer: discoverer of the North Pole, Greenland, and the Melville meteorite; died Jan 20, 1920

1895 - Rudolph Valentino (Rodolfo Pietro Filiberto Raffaello Guglielmi di Valentina)
actor; died Aug 23, 1926; see Valentino Day [above]

1903 - (Bernard) Toots Shor
restaurateur, barkeep; died Jan 23, 1977

1907 - (Wilbur Charles) Weeb Ewbank
Pro Football Hall of Famer: head coach: Baltimore Colts [2-time world champions: 1958-59], NY Jets [Super Bowl III]; coached 130 career wins; died Nov 17, 1998

1913 - Carmen Cavallaro
pianist: Chopin’s Polonaise; films: The Eddy Duchin Story, Hollywood Canteen, Out of this World, Diamond Horseshoe; died Oct 12, 1989

1915 - (George) Orson Welles
actor: War of the Worlds, Citizen Kane, The Mercury Radio Theatre of the Air, The Long Hot Summer, A Man for All Seasons, MacBeth, Moby Dick, Casino Royale, Catch-22; died Oct 10, 1985

1920 - Ross Hunter (Martin Fuss)
producer: Son of Ali Baba, Magnificent Obsession, My Man Godfrey, Tammy and the Bachelor, Pillow Talk, Midnight Lace, Flower Drum Song, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Airport; actor: Louisiana Hayride, Sweetheart of Sigma Chi, Reform School Girl; died Mar 10, 1996

1922 - Pat Harder
football: Univ of Wisconsin all-American; NFL: Detroit Lions, Chicago Cardinals: shared individual game record: points after touchdowns [9: Cardinals vs. NY Giants Oct 17, 1948]

1923 - Elizabeth Sellars
actress: A Voyage Round My Father, The Chalk Garden, Three Cases of Murder, Never Let Go, Desiree

1923 - Harry (Percival) Watson
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, Toronto Maple Leafs, Chicago Blackhawks

1926 - Marguerite Piazza (Luft)
soprano: regular on TV’s Your Show of Shows

1931 - Willie (Howard) Mays
Baseball Hall of Famer: ‘The Say Hey Kid’: NY Giants [World Series: 1951, 1954/all-star: 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957], SF Giants [World Series: 1962/all-star: 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971], NY Mets [World Series: 1973/all-star: 1972, 1973]

1940 - Bill (William Alfred) Hands
baseball: pitcher: SF Giants, Chicago Cubs, Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers

1945 - Bob Seger
musician, singer: Night Moves, Travelin’ Man, Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man, Against the Wind, Fire Lake

1946 - Grier Jones
golf: Walt Disney World National Team Championship [1977 w/Gibby Gilbert]

1947 - Ben Masters
actor: Running Mates, Noble House, All that Jazz, Making Mr. Right, Dream Lover, Mandingo, Heartbeat

1949 - Dennis Havig
football: Univ. of Colorado; NFL: Atlanta Falcons

1951 - Davey Johnstone
musician: guitar, in trio backing Elton John: Rocket Man, Honky Cat, Crocodile Rock, Daniel, Bennie and the Jets, Island Girl, The ***** is Back, Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me, Someone Saved My Life Tonight

1952 - Fred McNeil
football: Minnesota Vikings linebacker: Super Bowl IX, XI

1961 - George (Timothy) Clooney
actor: The Facts of Life, E/R, Return of the Killer Tomatoes!, Roseanne, Sunset Beat, Red Surf, Sisters, Baby Talk, Bodies of Evidence, ER, From Dusk Till Dawn, Batman & Robin, The Peacemaker, The Thin Red Line, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Perfect Storm; son of broadcast journalist Nick Clooney; nephew of singer Rosemary Clooney.

Chart Toppers
May 6th.

1950 My Foolish Heart - The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra (vocal: Eileen Wilson)
Bewitched - The Bill Snyder Orchestra
The Third Man Theme - Alton Karas
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 Tequila - The Champs
The Witch Doctor - David Seville
Wear My Ring Around Your Neck - Elvis Presley
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 Good Lovin’ - The Young Rascals
Monday Monday - The Mamas & The Papas
Sloop John B - The Beach Boys
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 The Loco-Motion - Grand Funk
Dancing Machine - The Jackson 5
The Streak - Ray Stevens
Things Aren’t Funny Anymore - Merle Haggard

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
Chariots of Fire - Titles - Vangelis
Ebony and Ivory - Paul McCartney with Stevie Wonder
Mountain Music - Alabama

1990 Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinead O’Connor
I Wanna Be Rich - Calloway
How Can We Be Lovers - Michael Bolton
Love on Arrival - Dan Seals


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-06-2007, 11:00 PM
127th day of 2007 - 238 remaining.

Monday, May 7, 2007
CHATTANOOGA CHOO CHOO DAY. :D

Glenn Miller and his Orchestra recorded one of the great American music standards, Chattanooga Choo Choo, on this day in 1941. The song was recorded at the famous Victor Recording Studios in Hollywood, California. The record not only became a big hit, it is said to have been the first gold record -- for selling over one million copies. The claim, incidentally, was a promotion idea of RCA Victor. It was not until over a decade later that the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) was formed to designate and audit actual certification for gold, and later, platinum records, tapes, CDs, videos and even computer software.

Song of the Volga Boatman, Elmer’s Tune, A String of Pearls, Moonlight ****tai", That Old Black Magic and Kalamazoo were also Glenn Miller #1 recordings alongside Chattanooga Choo Choo. All aboard!

Events
May 7th.


1789 - The first Presidential Inaugural Ball was held in New York City. Each lady in attendance received as a gift a portrait of George Washington. Actually, the ball was the first such event held for the incoming President of the United States.

1912 - Columbia University approved final plans for awarding the Pulitzer Prize in several categories. The award was established by Joseph Pulitzer.

1912 - The first airplane equipped with a machine gun flew over College Park, MD. This is strange, as the University of Maryland takes up about all of College Park! Maybe the flyer was looking for Terrapins (the school mascot). YIKES!

1915 - On its return trip from New York to Liverpool, England, the British ocean liner, Lusitania, was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland. The Lusitania was carrying a cargo of ammunition from the U.S. to Great Britain. This was Germany’s reason for the attack even though the ship was carrying over 2,000 civilian men, women and children. 1,198 lives were lost.

1945 - Baseball owner Branch Rickey announced the organization of the United States Negro Baseball League, consisting of six teams.

1945 - Nazi Colonel General Alfred Jodl, representing the German government, entered the headquarters of the Allied forces early this day. He was in a red school building in Reims, France for one purpose only ... signing the terms of unconditional surrender. Eisenhower’s Chief of Staff, Lt. General Walter B. Smith signed for the Allies.

1951 - Russia was admitted to participate in the 1952 Olympic Games by the International Olympic Committee.

1958 - Pianist Van Cliburn signed an artist’s contract with RCA Victor Records.

1959 - It was one of the most touching and memorable nights in all of baseball on this night. 93,103 fans packed the LA Coliseum for an exhibition game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the New York Yankees. Sandy Koufax pitched for the Dodgers and lost to the Yankees, 6-2. It was Roy Campanella Night. The star catcher for the Dodgers, paralyzed in an automobile accident, was honored for his contributions to the team for many years. ‘Campie’ continued to serve in various capacities with the Dodger organization for many years.

1966 - The Mamas & The Papas made the climb to the top of the Billboard pop music chart with Monday, Monday. For three weeks Monday, Monday stayed at the top of the pop music world. The tune was the second hit by the group -- just two months after their first, California Dreamin’. These two songs would be the only number one hits for the group, though they made it to number two with Dedicated to the One I Love.

1985 - The Edmonton Oilers set a National Hockey League record for playoff wins (12). Edmonton won its second Stanley Cup with a 7-3 win over the Chicago Black Hawks.

1987 - Shelly Long made her last appearance as a regular on the popular TV show, Cheers. Long, who played ****tail server, Diane Chambers, to often hilarious results, left the hit comedy to pursue a movie career.

Birthdays
May 7th.

1812 - Robert Browning
poet: Pauline, Men and Women, The Ring and the Book, Pippa Passes: God’s in His Heaven - All’s Right with the World; married to poet, Elizabeth Barrett; died Dec 12, 1889

1833 - Johannes Brahms
composer: Requiem, Symphony #1 in C Minor, Symphony #4 in E Minor; died Apr 3, 1897

1840 - Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
composer: Marche Slave, 1812 Overture, Swan Lake, Nutcracker Suite, Romeo and Juliet; died Nov 6, 1893

1861 - Rabindranath Tagore
Nobel prize-winner: literature [1913]; Hindu poet, mystic, musical composer; died Aug 7, 1941

1885 - Gabby (George Francis) Hayes
actor: sidekick of both Hopalong Cassidy and Roy Rogers, appeared in over 100 films; vaudevillian, silent movie villain; died Feb 9, 1969

1892 - Archibald MacLeish
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet: Conquistador [1933], Collected Poems, 1917-1952 [1953]; U.S. Librarian of Congress; died Apr 20, 1982

1901 - Gary (Frank James) Cooper
Academy Award-winning actor: Sergeant York [1941], High Noon [1952]; Beau Geste, The Virginian, The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell, The Wreck of the Mary Deare; died May 13, 1961

1919 - Eva (Evita) Peron
Argentina’s spiritual leader and wife of Argentina’s President, Juan Peron; actress on stage, film and radio; autobiography: The Reason for My Life; founder and president of the union entity: Agrupacion Radial Argentina; subject of the Broadway musical and film Evita; died July 26, 1952

1921 - Gale Robbins
actress, singer: The Barkley’s of Broadway, The Fuller Brush Girl, Three Little Words, The Belle of New York; died Feb 12, 1980

1922 - Darren McGavin
actor: The Night Stalker, Airport ’77, A Christmas Story, Billy Madison, Child in the Night, The Man with the Golden Arm, The Martian Chronicles, The Natural, Perfect Harmony, Dead Heat; died Feb 25, 2006

1923 - Anne Baxter
actress: The Ten Commandments, Walk on the Wild Side, All About Eve, Cimarron, East of Eden, Homecoming; died Dec 12, 1985

1927 - Jim Lowe
songwriter/singer: Green Door; songwriter: The Gambler’s Guitar, Close the Doors They’re Coming in the Windows; DJ: WCBS, WNBC, WNEW; syndicated host: Jim Lowe and Friends

1929 - Dick (Richard Hirschfeld) Williams
baseball: Brooklyn Dodgers [World Series: 1953], Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, Kansas City Athletics, Boston Red Sox; manager: Boston Red Sox, Oakland Athletics [winning 2 World Series], California Angels, Montreal Expos, San Diego Padres, Seattle Mariners

1930 - Totie Fields (Sophie Feldman)
entertainer, comedienne: “I’ve been on a diet for two weeks and all I’ve lost is two weeks.”; died August 2, 1978

1930 - Babe (Vito) Parilli
football: Univ of Kentucky: all-American; NHL: Green Bay Packers, Cleveland Browns, New England Patriots, Oakland Raiders, NY Jets [Super Bowl III]; offensive coach: Denver Broncos, New England Patriots

1931 - Teresa Brewer (Theresa Breuer)
singer: Music, Music, Music, Ricochet, Let Me Go Lover, A Sweet Old Fashioned Girl, ’Til I Waltz Again with You; actress: Redheads from Seattle

1933 - Johnny Unitas
Pro Football Hall of Famer: Baltimore Colts, San Diego Chargers quarterback; holds consecutive records for game touchdown passes [47] from 1956-1960; died Sep 11, 2002

1939 - Jimmy Ruffin
singer: What Becomes of the Brokenhearted, Hold on to My Love, There Will Never be Another You

1942 - Lorrie (Lawrencine May) Collins
country singer: rockabilly group [w/Larry Collins]: The Collins Kids: Rock Away Rock, In My Teens, Rock Boppin’ Baby, Hop Skip & Jump; featured on TV: Town Hall Party, Grand Ole Opry, Steve Allen Show

1943 - Ricky West
musician: guitar: group: Brian Poole & The Tremeloes: Twist & Shout, Do You Love Me, Someone Someone, Silence is Golden

1946 - Marv Hubbard
football: Colgate Univ., Oakland Raiders

1947 - Dave Hampton
football: Green Bay Packers: First 1,000-Yard Rusher [1,002 yards: 1975], Atlanta Falcons, Philadelphia Eagles

1949 - Kathy Ahern
golf champion: LPGA [1972]; died July 6, 1996

1950 - Tim Russert
TV host, moderator: NBC: Meet the Press, CNBC: Tim Russert

1951 - Janis Ian (Janis Eddy Fink)
Grammy Award-winning songwriter, singer: At Seventeen [1975]; Society’s Child

1953 - Terry Richardson
hockey: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, SL Blues

1954 - Amy Heckerling
director: Clueless, Look Who’s Talking series, National Lampoon’s European Vacation, Johnny Dangerously, Fast Times at Ridgemont High

1959 - Michael E. Knight
actor: All My Children, Hexed, Date with an Angel.

Chart Toppers
May 7th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
Sparrow in the Treetop - Bing Crosby
Cold, Cold Heart - Hank Williams

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
The Happy Organ - Dave ‘Baby’ Cortez
Sorry (I Ran All the Way Home) - The Impalas
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
The Happening - The Supremes
Sweet Soul Music - Arthur Conley
Need You - Sonny James

1975 He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) - Tony Orlando & Dawn
Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender
Chevy Van - Sammy Johns
Roll on Big Mama - Joe Stampley

1983 Beat It - Michael Jackson
Jeopardy - Greg Kihn Band
Let’s Dance - David Bowie
Jose Cuervo - Shelly West

1991 Baby Baby - Amy Grant
Joyride - Roxette
I Like the Way (The Kissing Game) - Hi-Five
Rockin’ Years - Dolly Parton with Ricky Van Shelton


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-07-2007, 11:00 PM
128th day of 2007 - 237 remaining.

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
COKE DAY. :)

Dr. John S. Pemberton first sold his secret elixir on this day in 1886. It was originally used for medicinal purposes. So Dr. Pemberton went to the right place to sell his new product: Jacob’s Pharmacy in Atlanta, GA.

Three years later, Dr. Pemberton figured that his secret formula had been enough of a success for him to sell out. He did just that, for $2,300. Even in 1889 dollars, $2,300 was a mere drop in the bucket for what the still very classified, secret formula would be worth. That formula is now used in a product that sells about 350 million cans and bottles a day in nearly 200 countries. That’s enough secret elixir for every man, woman and child on earth to consume -- 25 times a year.

Dr. Pemberton’s medicine was sold to make people feel better. It’s “the pause that refreshes.” It’s “the real thing.” It’s Coca-Cola. Have a Coke in honor of Dr. Pemberton, today.

Events
May 8th.


1847 - Robert W. Thomson of England patented the rubber tire on this day.

1879 - George Selden of Rochester, NY applied for the first automobile patent.

1915 - Regret captured the Kentucky Derby. The horse was the only filly to win the Run for the Roses in Louisville, KY.

1939 - Clay Puett invented a device that is still a common sight at thoroughbred race tracks around the world. The electric starting gate was used for the first time to start races at Hollywood Park in Inglewood, CA. The push of a button from a judges’ stand at trackside automatically opened the gates. It was set on wheels so that it could be pulled off the race course quickly. A bell sounds... and “They’re off!”

1941 - Anita O’Day recorded Let Me Off Uptown on Okeh Records with Gene Krupa and his band.

1945 - This day was celebrated throughout the free world. It was V-E Day. The Allied Forces had achieved victory in Europe with the unconditional surrender of Germany. The surrender had been made official on May 7th at Reims, France.

1959 - The final broadcast of One Man’s Family was heard on NBC radio after being on the air 27 years. The show had completed 3,256 episodes since its beginning back in 1932.

1961 - Shore Patrol Revisited became one of the most memorable episodes of the CBS-TV series, Hennessey. The program marked the first time that Jackie Cooper and Mickey Rooney appeared together professionally since they had been teenagers -- some 25 years earlier.

1961 - The New York Metropolitan Baseball Club Inc. selected the Mets as the name for their National League baseball franchise that would begin play at the Polo Grounds in 1962.

1962 - Zero Mostel starred in one of his most famous roles, in the Broadway production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. The comedy opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Audiences laughed through the entertaining show for a total of 964 performances.

1965 - College sophomore Randy Matson broke his own pending world record in the shot put by breaking the 70-foot barrier. Matson put that shot 70 feet, 7 inches at a meet in College Station, TX.

1968 - Catfish Hunter was pitching for Oakland in an American League baseball game against Minnesota. By the end of the game, with a score of 4-0, Catfish made history. He pitched what turned out to be the ninth perfect game in major-league baseball history.

1981 - Fernando Valenzuela, the sensational crowd-pleasing pitcher of the Los Angeles Dodgers, won his fifth shutout of the young baseball season. Fernando went on to win eight games without a loss and posted an amazing ERA of just 0.50!

1984 - Joanie (Erin Moran) and Chachi (Scott Baio) got married on Happy Days! The comedy series, starring Henry Winkler, Tom Bosley and Marion Ross (Ron Howard and Anson Williams had already left the show), was winding down in its final season on ABC-TV. In the same episode, Fonzie (brilliantly portrayed by Winkler), filed papers to adopt a son.

1985 - Larry Bird scored a career-high 43 points to lead the Boston Celtics to a 130-123 win over the Detroit Pistons.

Birthdays
May 8th.

1828 - Jean Henri Dunant
author; philanthropist: founder of Red Cross Society; died Oct 30, 1910

1848 - Oscar Hammerstein I
playwright, producer; died Aug 1, 1919

1884 - Harry S Truman
33rd U.S. President [1945-1953]; married to Bess Wallace [one daughter: Margaret]; nickname: Give ’em Hell Harry; died Dec 26, 1972

1893 - Francis Ouimet
stockbroker; philanthropist; golfer: credited with establishing the popularity of golf in U.S.; died Sep 3, 1967

1895 - Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen
TV clergyman: Life is Worth Living; died Dec 9, 1979

1906 - Roberto Rossellini
director: Seven Deadly Sins, The Messiah; died June 3, 1977

1911 - Robert Johnson
Blues Hall of Famer: singer, songwriter, guitarist: Sweet Home Chicago, Cross Road Blues, Me and the Devil Blues; subject of film, Crossroads; inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [1986]; died Aug 16, 1938

1919 - Lex Barker (Alexander Crichlow Barker Jr.)
actor: A Place Called Glory, La Dolce Vita, Apaches Last Battle, Away All Boats, Executioner of Venice; died May 11, 1973

1926 - David Attenborough
naturalist, author: Life on Earth, Trials of Life

1926 - Don Rickles
comedian, actor: CPO Sharkey, Casino, Blazing Saddles, Kelly’s Heroes, Beach Blanket Bingo, The Rat Race

1928 - Theodore C. (Ted) Sorensen
Special Counsel to U.S. President John F. Kennedy; author: Kennedy; Leaders of Our Time, The Kennedy Legacy, Why I Am a Democrat, Watchmen in the night : Presidential accountability after Watergate

1932 - (Charles) Sonny Liston
International Boxing Hall of Famer, World Heavyweight Boxing Champion [1962, 1963]; International Boxing Hall of Famer; 54 bouts: won 50 [39 KOs], lost 4; died Dec 30, 1970

1937 - Mike (Miguel Angel Santana) Cuellar
baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Reds, SL Cardinals, Houston Astros [all-star: 1967], Baltimore Orioles [Cy Young Award Winner: 1969/all-star: 1970, 1971, 1974/World Series: 1969, 1970, 1971], California Angels

1937 - Thomas Pynchon
writer: V., Slow Learner: Early Stories

1940 - Peter Benchley
author: Jaws, The Deep, The Island; died Feb 11, 2006

1940 - Ricky (Eric Hilliard) Nelson
actor: The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, Rio Bravo, Wackiest Ship in the Army, Love and Kisses; singer: I’m Walkin’, Be-Bop Baby, Poor Little Fool, Lonesome Town, Never Be Anyone Else But You, Travelin’ Man, Garden Party; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer [1987]; killed in plane crash Dec 31, 1985

1940 - Toni Tennille
singer: Love Will Keep Us Together, The Way I Want to Touch You, Lonely Night [Angel Face], Muskrat Love

1941 - James Mitchum
actor: In Harm’s Way, Code Name: Zebra, Hollywood Cop, Marked for Murder, Ride the Wild Surf

1944 - Gary Glitter (Paul Gadd)
singer: Rock And Roll (Parts I & II), I’m the Leader of the Gang [I Am], I Love You Love Me Love, Hello Hello I’m Back Again, Do You Wanna Touch, Another Rock ’n’ Roll Christmas

1953 - Alex Van Halen
drummer: group: Van Halen: Jump, Why Can’t This Be Love, When It’s Love, Dance the Night Away; brother of Eddie and Michael

1954 - David Keith
actor: The Great Santini, Take This Job & Shove It, An Officer and a Gentleman; director: The Curse, The Further Adventures of Tennessee Buck

1959 - Ronnie (Ronald Mandel) Lott
football: All-American DB USC, SF 49ers, Oakland Raiders, NY Jets; Super Bowls XVI, XIX, XXIII, XXIV

1964 - Melissa Gilbert
actress: Little House on the Prairie, The Miracle Worker, Her Own Rules, Murder at 75 Birch.

Chart Toppers
May 8th.

1944 I Love You - Bing Crosby
I’ll Get By - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Dick Haymes)
Long Ago and Far Away - Helen Forrest & Dick Haymes
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Blue Tango - The Leroy Anderson Orchestra
Blacksmith Blues - Ella Mae Morse
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Easy on the Eyes - Eddy Arnold

1960 Stuck on You - Elvis Presley
Sink the Bismarck - Johnny Horton
Sixteen Reasons - Connie Stevens
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Tighten Up - Archie Bell & The Drells
Young Girl - The Union Gap
The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde - Merle Haggard

1976 Welcome Back - John Sebastian
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
Boogie Fever - Sylvers
My Eyes Can Only See as Far as You - Charley Pride

1984 Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now - The Thompson Twins
I Guess It Never Hurts to Hurt Sometimes - The Oak Ridge Boys


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;) )


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-08-2007, 11:00 PM
129th day of 2007 - 236 remaining.

Wednesday, May 9, 2007
THE BIGGEST LITTLE CITY IN THE WORLD DAY. :)

Happy Birthday to Reno, Nevada. It was on this day in 1868 that a little town in Northwestern Nevada was officially named, Reno (after General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer of the Civil War). Actually, the town that was just over the border from California, already existed before this date. It was first settled by the Washoe Indians who used the area for festivals and ceremonies. Then, as settlers moved in, it was known as Fuller’s Ferry, and later, as Lake’s Crossing.

In the mid 1800s, Reno was just another settlement of silver miners. When the Comstock Lode was discovered in the Virginia City area, intrigued fortune hunters throughout the world came to the area to strike it rich.

Today, they still come to strike it rich at Reno’s glitzy gambling casinos.

Reno, also a haven for quickie divorces (only a six-week residency is required), is known as the biggest little city in the world, the winning slogan from a contest held in 1929.

Events
May 9th.


1754 - The first cartoon appeared in The Pennsylvania Gazette, the newspaper published at the time in Philadelphia, PA, Benjamin Franklin’s hometown. The cartoon appeared as part of an editorial by Franklin commenting on “the present disunited state of the British Colonies.” The title of the featured cartoon is “JOIN, or DIE.” The drawing is of a snake, chopped into eight pieces. Each of the pieces are labeled with the abbreviation for one of the colonies. The message was that the colonies’ continued failure to join together would result in their eventual doom.

1930 - For the first time, a starting gate was used to start a Triple Crown race. The gate was rolled into place at the Preakness at the Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, MD. Gallant Fox, the winner, had no problem with the new contraption. Prior to that time, this horse race began from a standing start at the start/finish line with the drop of a flag.

1936 - The first sheet of postage stamps of more than one variety went on sale -- in New York City.

1936 - Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy started their own radio show on NBC -- only months after they had debuted on Rudy Vallee’s radio program. W.C. Fields, Don Ameche and Dorothy Lamour were a few of the stars that helped Bergen and the little blockhead, McCarthy, jump to the top of radio’s hit parade.

1939 - Ray Eberle recorded Stairway to the Stars with the Glenn Miller Orchestra for Bluebird records.

1940 - Actress Vivien Leigh made her American theatre debut with Laurence Olivier in Romeo and Juliet in New York City.

1958 - Richard Burton made his network television debut in The Dupont Show of the Month presentation of Wuthering Heights on CBS-TV.

1961 - Jim Gentile of the Baltimore Orioles set a major-league baseball record by hitting grand slam home runs in two consecutive innings. The Orioles were playing the Minnesota Twins.

1962 - The Beatles inked their first recording contract. George Martin was hired to be the group’s producer and the band would record for EMI Parlophone.

1964 - Hello Dolly! became the top pop record in the U.S. The milestone put Louis Armstrong on the Billboard music chart in the top spot for the first time in his 41-year music career. Later, ‘Satchmo’ was cast in the movie version of Hello Dolly!.

1965 - Vladimir Horowitz played his first public concert in 12 years at Carnegie Hall in New York City. The audience applauded the piano virtuoso with a standing ovation that lasted for 30 minutes.

1984 - Detroit beat Kansas City, 3-1, to tie the record for the best start of any major-league baseball team. The Tigers went 25-4 in their first 29 games -- a record matched only by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955.

1984 - It took the Chicago White Sox 25 innings, eight hours, six minutes -- and two days -- to finally defeat the Milwaukee Brewers, 7-6. It was the longest game (in elapsed time) in major-league history. Tom Seaver pitched one inning of relief in the suspended game to notch the win. The game tied the record for the longest game played to a decision.

Birthdays
May 9th.


1800 - John Brown
abolitionist: led attack on Harper’s Ferry in 1859; executed [hanged] Dec 2, 1859

1843 - Belle Boyd
actress; lecturer; author: Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison; Confederate spy; died June 11, 1900

1860 - Sir James Barrie
author, dramatist: Peter Pan, The Little Minister, The Admirable Crichton, What Every Woman Knows, Dear Brutus; died June 19, 1937

1882 - Henry J. (John) Kaiser
industrialist: ship builder; auto manufacturer: Jeep; aviation, aluminum, steel, magnesium; founder of Hawaii Kai residential neighborhood in Honolulu; died Aug 24, 1967

1914 - Hank Snow (Clarence Eugene)
Country Music Hall of Famer: singer, songwriter: I’m Moving On [recorded in 36 languages], Golden Rocket, I Don’t Hurt Anymore, Rhumba Boogie, Hello Love, I’ve Been Everywhere; died Dec 20, 1999

1918 - Mike (Myron Leon) Wallace
reporter, interviewer: 60 Minutes, Mike Wallace at Large

1928 - (Richard) Pancho Gonzales
tennis: U.S. Open Champion [1948, 1949; died July 3, 1995

1935 - Nokie Edwards
musician: guitar: group: The Ventures: Walk Don’t Run, Perfidia, Hawaii Five-O Theme

1936 - Albert Finney
actor: Tom Jones, Shoot the Moon, Annie, The Dresser, Murder on the Orient Express, Scrooge

1936 - Glenda Jackson
Academy Award-winning actress: Women in Love [1970], A Touch of Class [1973]

1936 - Floyd (Andrew) Robinson
baseball: Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds, Boston Red Sox, Oakland Athletics

1937 - Sonny Curtis
musician: guitar: group: Buddy Holly & The Crickets: My Little Girl; solo: A Beatle I Want to Be; songwriter: Rock Around with Ollie Vee, Walk Right Back, More Than I Can Say, I Fought the Law

1939 - Ralph Boston
National Track & Field Hall of Famer, Olympic Hall of Famer: gold medalist: long jump [1960], silver [1964], bronze [1968]; broke world long jump record 5 times, the last at 27 feet, 5 inches [1965]

1940 - James L. Brooks
Emmy Award-winning writer: The Mary Tyler Moore Show [1971, 1977]; Emmy Award-winning producer: The Mary Tyler Moore Show [1975, 1976, 1977], Taxi [1979, 1980, 1981], The Tracy Ullman Show [1989], The Simpsons [1990, 1991]; Academy Award-winning director: Terms of Endearment [1984], I’ll Do Anything, Broadcast News, Thursday’s Game; screenwriter: I’ll Do Anything, Broadcast News, Terms of Endearment, Starting Over, Thursday’s Game, Room 222

1941 - Pete Birrell
musician: bass: group: Freddie & The Dreamers: If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody, I’m Telling You Now, You Were Made for Me, I Understand, Do the Freddie

1942 - Tommy Roe
singer, songwriter: Sheila, Save Your Kisses; singer: Susie Darlin’, Everybody, The Folk Singer, Sweet Pea, Hooray for Hazel, Dizzy, Jam Up Jelly Tight

1944 - Richie Furay
musician: group: Poco, Buffalo Springfield: I Still Have Dreams, Call It Love

1945 - Steve Katz
record producer; musician: guitar, harmonica, singer: group: Blood, Sweat and Tears: And When I Die, You Make Me So Very Happy, Spinning Wheel

1946 - Candice Bergen
Emmy Award-winning actress: Murphy Brown [1989, 1990, 1992, 1993]; Starting Over, The Group, Boston Legal; daughter of ventriloquist Edgar Bergen

1948 - John Mahaffey
golf champion: PGA [1978]

1948 - Calvin Murphy
Basketball Hall of Famer: Houston Rockets

1949 - Billy Joel
Grammy Award-winning singer: Just the Way You Are [1979]; My Life, You May be Right, It’s Still Rock ’n’ Roll to Me, Allentown, Goodnight Saigon, Tell Her about It, Uptown Girl, Piano Man; inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [3-15-99]

1950 - Tom Petersson
musician: bass, singer: group: Cheap Trick: I Want You to Want Me, Ain’t That a Shame, Dream Police, Voices

1962 - David Gahan
singer: group: Depeche Mode: Enjoy the Silence, Just Can't Get Enough, People are People, Personal Jesus

1962 - Paul Heaton
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Housemartins: Now That's What I Call Quite Good, The People Who Grinned Themselves to Death, London 0, Hul 4; group: The Beautiful South: Painting It Red, Quench, Blue is the Colour.

Chart Toppers
May 9th.

1945 Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
He’s Home for a Little While - Dinah Shore
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 Pretend - Nat King Cole
Song from Moulin Rouge - The Percy Faith Orchestra
I Believe - Frankie Laine
Mexican Joe - Jim Reeves

1961 Runaway - Del Shannon
Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
A Hundred Pounds of Clay - Gene McDaniels
Hello Walls - Faron Young

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
Hair - The Cowsills
Hawaii Five-O - The Ventures
Hungry Eyes - Merle Haggard

1977 Hotel California - Eagles
When I Need You - Leo Sayer
Sir Duke - Stevie Wonder
Play, Guitar Play - Conway Twitty

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Don’t You Forget About Me - Simple Minds
There’s No Way - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-09-2007, 11:00 PM
130th day of 2007 - 235 remaining

Thursday, May 10, 2007
GOLDEN SPIKE DAY. :)

The Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railways met on this day in 1869.

There was a grand celebration at Promontory, Utah when, in honor of the linking of the two railways, a golden spike was driven into the railroad. The spike, valued at $400, was driven, along with bronze spikes into a laurelwood tie by the president of the Central Pacific, Leland Stanford. Some say Mr. Stanford missed on his first stroke.

Immediately after the celebration, the spikes and tie were removed and replaced with the standard pine tie and steel spikes.

Interestingly, the people involved in this historic moment were unaware of its significance in the great scheme of things; and no markings were left at the specific location of the meeting of the rails. It is possible that the point at Promontory is a little to the left or south or north or right of the true spot where the rails were joined. In other words, like Mr. Stanford, we may have missed the exact spot that marks the final link in the ocean-to-ocean railroad.

Events
May 10th.


1872 - The first woman nominated to be President of the United States was Victoria Claflin Woodhull. She was chosen for the ballot by the National Woman Suffrage Association in New York City. Ms. Woodhull was not elected; nor has any woman ever been elected to the office of U.S. President. The closest any woman has come to the top seat of the nation since Victoria Woodhull was Geraldine A. Ferraro who was on the Democratic party slate as the Vice-Presidential candidate in 1984.

1876 - Richard Wagner’s Centennial Inaugural March was heard for the first time at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, PA. Wagner did just fine for creating the magnificent work. He received a paycheck of $5,000. In 1876 bucks, that would put groceries on the table and in the pantry for quite a bit of time...

1905 - Three horses made up the field of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY. Agile was the winner. With only three horses -- win, place and show -- does that mean that everyone in attendance won something?

1913 - Donerail won the Kentucky Derby on this day, making a very, very few in attendance very, very happy. Donerail was a 91-to-1 long shot! Whoa! Nellie!

1927 - The Hotel Statler in Boston, MA. became the first hotel to install radio headsets in each of its 1,300 rooms. What a concept! Of course, radio was only seven years old and, since this was the first hotel equipped with headsets, we heard that they were all plugged into the heaters -- and when guests turned up the heat knob, they singed their ears -- a lot like some radio programming does today!

1930 - The Adler Planetarium opened to the public in Chicago, IL.

1940 - Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded the classic, Perfidia, for Decca Records. The song would later be a hit for The Ventures (1960).

1951 - Frank Sinatra teamed with Axel Stordahl’s orchestra and Mitch Miller on Columbia Records. He sang with Dagmar, It’s a Long Way (From Your House to My House), and the equally forgettable, Mama Will Bark. Yes, friends, Mama Will Bark, by Frank Sinatra with vocal impressions of a dog by Donald Bain! This sure wasn’t a session like the ones that produced In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning, That’s Life, My Way or hundreds of other great tunes from Ol’ Blue Eyes.

1960 - Around the world in 80 days ... uh, make that 84 days. That’s how long it took the U.S. nuclear-powered submarine Triton to circumnavigate the globe. The Triton was the largest, most powerful submarine in the world when it made its record underwater trip. Captain Edward L. Beach led the 7,750-ton sub on a 41,500 mile voyage, following a similar route taken by explorer Ferdinand Magellan some three centuries earlier (obviously on the water’s surface, not below). The Triton’s conning tower reached above the waves off Delaware, completing the voyage that began February 16 at Groton, Connecticut with 183 aboard. One objective of the Triton’s trip was to test the physical and psychological effects on humans when deprived of sunlight and fresh air for an extended length of time. Captain Beach (author of "Run Silent, Run Deep") was thinking more of the sub’s test of power when he wrote in his log: “One can almost become lyrical thinking of the tremendous drive of the dual power plant of this great ship.”

1963 - The Rolling Stones produced their very first recordings this day. The session included Come On and I Wanna Be Loved. The Stones would make it to the American pop music charts in August, 1964.

1969 - The National and American Football Leagues announced plans to merge for the 1970-71 season. Two conferences of 13 teams each were formed ... and the rest is NFL history.

1970 - The Boston Bruins won their first Stanley Cup since the beginning of World War II by defeating St. Louis. The Bruins would repeat the feat and take home Lord Stanley’s Cup again in 1972.

1974 - Just Don’t Want to Be Lonely earned a gold record for the group, The Main Ingredient. The trio began as the Poets in 1964. Cuba Gooding is heard singing lead. (Gooding’s son, Cuba Jr., starred in the 1991 film Boyz N The Hood.) The Main Ingredient’s biggest hit, Everybody Plays the Fool, made it to number three on the pop charts (1972).

1982 - Elliott Gould made his dramatic television debut after 30 movies in 17 years. He starred in The Rules of Marriage which aired on CBS-TV. Elizabeth Montgomery, formerly of Bewitched, co-starred with Gould in the film about marriage and divorce.

1985 - Gordon John**** announced that he was retiring from auto racing. John****, a 30-year veteran and twice an Indianapolis 500 winner, said that racing was “not fun anymore.” In his career, John**** won 254 championship races.

1986 - Navy Lt. Commander Donnie Cochran became the first black pilot to fly with the celebrated Blue Angels precision aerial demonstration team.

Birthdays
May 10th.

1899 - Fred Astaire (Austerlitz)
dancer, actor: Funny Face, Silk Stockings, Finian’s Rainbow, Daddy Long Legs, Easter Parade, Let’s Dance, That’s Entertainment, The Towering Inferno; died June 22, 1987

1899 - Dimitri Tiomkin
conductor, composer: film scores: The Alamo, Dial ‘M’ for Murder, Friendly Persuasion, High Noon, It’s a Wonderful Life, Lost Horizon, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; died Nov 11, 1979

1902 - David O. (Oliver) Selznick
producer: King Kong, A Star Is Born, The Prisoner of Zenda, Gone with the Wind, Duel in the Sun, The Third Man, A Farewell to Arms; died June 22, 1965

1909 - Mother Maybelle Carter (Addington)
musician: played melody on bass strings of guitar, rhythm on treble, singer: group: The Carter Family: Keep on the Sunny Side, Foggy Mountain Top; member Grand Ole Opry: A Jilted Love, Don’t Wait; died Oct 23, 1978

1910 - Jimmy Demaret
golf champion: Masters [1940, 1947, 1950]; died Dec 28, 1983

1914 - Charles McGraw
actor: A Boy and His Dog, Cimarron, The Bridges at Toko-Ri, The Defiant Ones, The Horizontal Lieutenant, Spartacus; died July 30, 1980

1917 - Margo (Maria Marguerita Guadalupe Teresa Estela Bolado Castilla y O’Donnell)
actress: Viva Zapata!, Lost Horizon, I’ll Cry Tomorrow, Winterset; died July 17, 1985

1922 - Nancy Walker (Ann Myrtle Swoyer)
actress: McMillan and Wife; Bounty paper towel spots; Murder by Death, Broadway Rhythm, Forty Carats; died Mar 25, 1992

1927 - Mike Souchak
golf champion: PGA Tour record holder: lowest score in 9 holes [27] and 72 holes [257]: 1955 Texas Open

1930 - Pat Summerall
football: New York Giants kicker; TV sportscaster: football, golf

1935 - Larry Williams (Lawrence E. Williams)
singer: Short Fat Fannie, Bony Maronie, Dizzy Miss Lizzie; died Jan 2, 1980

1936 - Gary Owens
Radio Hall of Famer; TV announcer, actor: Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-in: “From beautiful Downtown Burbank...”, The Gong Show

1937 - Arthur L. Kopit
playwright: Hands of a Stranger, The Phantom of the Opera, Roswell: The U.F.O. Cover-up

1938 - Henry Fambrough
singer: group: Spinners: I’ll Be Around, Could It Be I’m Falling in Love, The Rubberband Man

1938 - Manuel Santana
tennis: International Tennis Hall of Famer

1941 - Ken (Allen Kent) Berry
baseball: Chicago White Sox [all-star: 1967], California Angels, Milwaukee Brewers, Cleveland Indians

1941 - Danny Rapp
singer: group: Danny & The Juniors: At the Hop, Rock and Roll is Here to Stay; passed Apr 5, 1983

1944 - Jim Abrahams
writer, director: Hot Shots! series, Big Business, Top Secret!, Police Squad, Help Wanted, Airplane!; writer: The Naked Gun; director: Ruthless People, Big Business

1944 - Judith Jamison
dancer: American Ballet Theatre [debut: 1964], Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre; starred in Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies; choreographer: created works for many companies, Rift, Hymn, Riverside, Sweet Release; autobiography: Dancing Spirit

1944 - Marie-France Pisier
actress: Prize of the Peril, Miss Right, Chanel Solitaire, We Will Not Enter the Forest, Cousin Cousine, French Postcards, The Other Side of Midnight

1945 - Randy Rasmussen
football: Univ of Nebraska; NFL: New York Jets guard: Super Bowl III

1946 - Graham Gouldman
musician: guitar, singer, songwriter: For Your Love, Evil Hearted You; group: 10cc

1946 - Donovan (Leitch)
singer: Mellow Yellow, Sunshine Superman, Atlantis; composer: film: If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium, appeared in film: The Pied Piper of Hamlin, Brother Sun, Sister Moon

1946 - Dave Mason
songwriter, musician, singer: Alone Together, Hole in My Shoe, Just for You, Feelin’ Alright, We Just Disagree, So High

1946 - Jimmy Ponder
jazz guitarist: Smokin’, Mama Roots, Infant Eyes

1947 - Jay (John) Ferguson
singer: group: Spirit: I Got a Line on You, Nature’s Way; group: Jo Jo Gunne

1948 - Meg Foster
actress: Undercover, Lady in Waiting, To Catch a Killer, They Live, The Emerald Forest, Carny, James Dean, Adam at 6 a.m., Cagney & Lacey, Sunshine, The Trials of Rosie O’Neill

1957 - Sid Vicious (John Simon Ritchie)
musician: bass guitarist: Sex Pistols; died Feb 2, 1979

1960 - Bono (Paul Hewson)
singer: group: U2: Sunday Bloody Sunday, Pride [In the Name of Love], With You or Without You

1966 - Jason Brooks
actor: Days of Our Lives, Baywatch.

Chart Toppers
May 10th.

1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Shoo Fly Pie - The Stan Kenton Orchestra (vocal: June Christy)
One-zy, Two-zy - Phil Harris
New Spanish Two Step - Bob Wills

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Young at Heart - Frank Sinatra
Little Things Mean a Lot - Kitty Kallen
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Soldier Boy - The Shirelles
Mashed Potato Time - Dee Dee Sharp
Stranger on the Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk
Charlie’s Shoes - Billy Walker

1970 American Woman/No Sugar Tonight - The Guess Who
Vehicle - The Ides of March
Love or Let Me Be Lonely - The Friends of Distinction
The Pool Shark - Dave Dudley

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
If I Can’t Have You - Yvonne Elliman
The Closer I Get to You - Roberta Flack with Donny Hathaway
It’s All Wrong, But It’s All Right - Dolly Parton

1986 West End Girls - Pet Shop Boys
Greatest Love of All - Whitney Houston
Why Can’t This Be Love - Van Halen
Grandpa (Tell Me ’bout the Good Old Days) - The Judds


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-10-2007, 11:00 PM
131st day of 2007 - 234 remaining.

Friday, May 11, 2007
THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS DAY. :)

There never was show business like we know it until this day in 1888, when Israel Baline was born in Tyumen, Russia. Maybe you don’t recognize this name; but we’re sure you’ll recognize and be able to sing many of the tunes he composed when he grew up.

Little Israel came to the United States with his family at the age of four. His father died several years later, so Israel took to the streets of New York, singing on street corners and in saloons, and as a singing waiter, all to earn money to help support his family. It was the beginning of a wonderful career in song, stage and movies. A printer’s error on the music sheet for his composition, Marie from Sunny Italy, accidentally changed his name. The change became permanent.

Mr. American Music, better known to us as Irving Berlin, wrote more songs than we care to count including Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Always, Doin’ What Comes Naturally, Puttin’ on the Ritz, Blue Skies, Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning and Play a Simple Melody. This man, who could neither read nor write music, also composed a song titled, Smile and Show Your Dimple. You probably never heard of that one; but seventeen years later, when produced, it became a hit as Easter Parade.

Kate Smith was the voice he chose to sing God Bless America, which he wrote in 1917. It became her signature and a major contender to replace The Star-Spangled Banner as the U.S. national anthem.

Berlin wrote the scores for many Broadway shows (Annie Get Your Gun) and films (Top Hat). Winning an Oscar for his composition, White Christmas, Irving Berlin had the unique experience of opening the envelope that contained his name. He was the presenter at this segment of the Academy Awards for 1942 and upon opening the envelope, said, “This goes to a nice guy; I’ve known him all my life. The winner is ... me.”

The composer of There’s No Business Like Show Business truly knew the meaning of those words.

Events
May 11th.

1816 - The American Bible Society was formed in New York City.

1858 - Minnesota entered the United States of America this day as the Union’s 32nd state. Although its state bird is the common loon, there’s nothing common about Minnesota, whose Dakota-Sioux Indian name means sky-tinted water. The North Star State’s capital is St. Paul, which has a twin city, Minneapolis. The state flower is the lovely lady’s slipper.

1900 - In an effort to regain the heavyweight boxing title, James J. Corbett, known as Gentleman Jim, was knocked out cold by James J. Jeffries -- in the 23rd round. Maybe if he’d stopped at, say, 12 rounds...

1910 - Glacier National Park in Montana was created by an act of Congress. These days, it takes an act of Congress to do just about anything, including getting Congress to act! Thank you.

1927 - The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded; although the first Oscars were not presented for several years after its founding.

1928 - WGY-TV in Schenectady, NY began the first schedule of regular TV programs. A very short schedule, in fact. WGY offered programming to the upstate New York audience three times a week using the mechanical scanning method. And mechanical scanning was not to be the wave of the future. It was electrical scanning, developed by Philo Farnsworth, that would make television available to the masses.

1946 - Jack Barry, a familiar face on TV game shows, hosted Juvenile Jury on WOR radio in New York City. The show was such a hit after five weeks on the air that it debuted on the Mutual Broadcasting System coast to coast. Maybe Barry became a bit too familiar in 1959. It was Twenty One, the enormously popular show that Barry hosted, that led to the Quiz Show Scandal that rocked television and the U.S. Congress.

1946 - B.F. Goodrich announced the development of the tubeless tire. If you guessed that Mr. Goodrich was from Akron, OH, you win the T-shirt.

1956 - Former heavyweight boxing champion Rocky Marciano went into public relations for the Raynham Dog Racing Track in Massachusetts.

1957 - Monte Irvin retired from baseball at the age of 39, due to a back injury.

1965 - Liza Minnelli opened in Flora the Red Menace. The musical ran for only 87 performances at the Alvin Theatre.

1970 - The Chairmen of the Board received a gold record for the hit, Give Me Just a Little More Time. The Detroit group recorded three other songs in 1970, with moderate success.

1972 - The San Francisco Giants announced that they were trading Willie Mays to the New York Mets.

1981 - Heavyweight boxing challenger Gerry Cooney left former champ Ken Norton on the ropes and unconscious after 54 seconds of the first round at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

1984 - The Detroit Tigers defeated the California Angels 8-2 and set a major-league record for victories at the beginning of a baseball season. The Tigers, under Sparky Anderson, won 26 of their first 30 games.

1985 - Duane ‘Pancho’ Carter grabbed the pole position for the Indianapolis 500. Carter entered the history books with a speed of 212.583 MPH for four qualifying laps around the 2.5 mile track at Indy.

1985 - Scott Brayton turned in the fastest lap ever at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Brayton was traveling at 214.199 MPH in the third lap of qualifying. He had already set records in the first two trips around the track. Brayton’s average speed of 212.354 broke the record previously set by Tom Sneva in the 1984 time trials.

Birthdays
May 11th.

1888 - Irving Berlin
composer; died Sep 22, 1989; see There’s No Business Like Show Business Day [above]

1894 - Martha Graham
modern dancer: Denishawn dance school and performing troupe, Graham company, established school of modern dance at Bennington College; choreographer: Cave of the Heart, Appalachian Spring; “The center of the stage is where I am.”; died Apr 1, 1991

1904 - Salvadore (Felipe Jacinto) Dalí (y Domenech)
surrealist artist: Accommodations of Desire, The Persistence of Memory, Visage of War; died Jan 23, 1989

1911 - Phil Silvers (Philip Silversmith)
Emmy Award-winning comedian: The Phil Silvers Show [Sgt. Bilko: 1955, 1956, 1957]; The Beverly Hillbillies, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum; died Nov 1, 1985

1911 - Doodles (Winstead) Weaver
actor: Road to Nashville, The Errand Boy, The Ladies’ Man, Way He Was; died Jan 17, 1983

1912 - Foster Brooks
comedian, actor: The Villain, Cracking Up, Oddballs, The New Bill Cosby Show, Mork & Mindy, The Dean Martin Show, The Bobby Vinton Show, The Book of Lists; died Dec 20, 2001

1920 - Denver Pyle
actor: The Dukes of Hazzard, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, Life & Times of Grizzly Adams, Bonnie & Clyde; died Dec 25, 1997

1927 - Mort Sahl
comedian: Broadway, night club acts, actor: Don’t Make Waves, Doctor You’ve Got to be Kidding

1930 - Stanley Elkin
author: Boswell, A Bad Man, The Dick Gibson Show, The Franchiser, The Living End, George Mills, Alex & the Gypsy; died in 1995; died May 31, 1995

1931 - Dick Garcia
guitarist: LPs: A Message from Garcia, Four Most Guitars [w/Jimmy Raney, Chuck Wayne, Joe Puma]; played w/George Shearing Quintet

1932 - Valentino (Garavani)
fashion designer: dedicated Collection Blanche to Jackie Kennedy [1967]; his ready-to-wear collections have been shown in Paris since 1969; founded Valentino Academy [1990]

1935 - Doug McClure
actor: The Gambler Returns, Omega Syndrome, The Unforgiven, The Virginian, Search, Roots, Out of this World, The Overland Trail, Checkmate, The Barbary Coast; died Feb 5, 1995

1939 - Milt (Miltiades Stergios Papastegios) Pappas
‘Gimpy’: baseball [pitcher]: Baltimore Orioles: Baltimore Orioles [all-star: 1962, 1965], Cincinnati Reds, Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs

1939 - Frank (Francis Ralph) Quilici
‘Guido’: baseball: Minnesota Twins [World Series: 1965]

1940 - Butch (Larry) Hartman
auto racer: USAC: four stock car crowns [1970s]

1941 - Eric Burdon
singer: groups: The Animals: When I was Young, Good Times, San Franciscan Nights, Sky Pilot, Ring of Fire, House of the Rising Sun; Eric Burdon and War: Spill the Wine; soundtrack for: Comeback

1943 - Les (John) Chadwick
musician: bass: group: Gerry & The Pacemakers: How Do You Do It?, I Like It, You’ll Never Walk Alone, I’m the One, Don’t Let the Sun Catch You Crying

1943 - Nancy Greene
skier: Olympic Medalist: Gold: giant slalom, Silver, slalom [1968]; Canadian Sports Hall of Famer

1946 - Robert Jarvik
physician: inventor of the Jarvik 7 artificial heart [implanted into Barney Clark in 1982: kept Clark alive 112 days]

1948 - Bobby Cole
golf: champ: Buick Open [1977]

1963 - Natasha Richardson
actress: Widow’s Peak, Nell, Hostages, Past Midnight, The Handmaid’s Tale, Patty Hearst, Gothic, On the Razzle, The Charge of the Light Brigade; daughter of actress Vanessa Redgrave and director Tony Richardson, sister of actress Joely Richardson, niece of actress Lynn Redgrave.

Chart Toppers
May 11th.

1947 Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
New Jolie Blonde (New Pretty Blonde) - Red Foley

1955 Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
Honey-Babe - Art Mooney
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 I Will Follow Him - Little Peggy March
Puff the Magic Dragon - Peter, Paul & Mary
If You Wanna Be Happy - Jimmy Soul
Lonesome 7-7203 - Hawkshaw Hawkins

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5
I Am...I Said - Neil Diamond
How Much More Can She Stand - Conway Twitty

1979 Reunited - Peaches & Herb
Music Box Dancer - Frank Mills
Stumblin’ In - Suzi Quatro & Chris Norman
Backside of Thirty - John Conlee

1987 (I Just) Died in Your Arms - Cutting Crew
Looking for a New Love - Jody Watley
With or Without You - U2
The Moon is Still Over Her Shoulder - Michael Johnson


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-11-2007, 11:00 PM
132nd day of 2007 - 233 remaining.

Saturday, May 12, 2007
LIMERICK DAY. :)

Edward Lear was born on this day in 1812 in Highgate, England. Lear was a poet and a talented illustrator.

A big champion of the limerick (which dates back to the early 18th century), Lear wrote Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense and other such amusing pieces. The Nonsense book especially helped the limerick to become very popular. The limerick is the only fixed-verse form indigenous to the English language.

So, what are you waiting for? Write a limerick today! Here’s one to get you started:

There once was a man named Nation,
Who worked for a radio station.
Although he was tall,
His hands were too small,
Wee paws for station identification.

Events
May 12th.

1831 - The first indicted bank robber in the U.S., Edward Smith, was sentenced to five years hard labor on the rock pile at Sing Sing Prison.

1847 - As you jog around the block today, think of Mormon pioneer William Clayton. It was on this day that he got tired of counting the revolutions of a rag tied to a spoke of a wagon wheel to figure out how many miles he had traveled. So, while he was crossing the plains in his covered wagon, he invented the odometer.

1917 - The first imported horse to win the Kentucky Derby was the English-bred colt, Omar Khayyam. He won $49,070 -- the top prize.

1950 - The American Bowling Congress abolished its white males-only membership restriction after 34 years.

1953 - The Boston Red Sox dropped Dom DiMaggio, Joe’s brother. As a result, Dom announced that he was retiring from baseball.

1955 - Sam Jones of the Chicago Cubs pitched a no-hitter against the Pittsburgh Pirates, winning 4-0. Jones became the first black pitcher to throw a major-league no-hitter.

1955 - Gisele MacKenzie played a singer on the NBC-TV program, Justice. She introduced her soon-to-be hit song, Hard to Get. The song went to number four on the Billboard pop music chart by September.

1955 - Passengers crowded in to ride the last run of the Third Avenue elevated, The El, in New York City. The way-above-ground train trip down memory lane went from Chinatown to the Bronx.

1957 - A.J. Foyt earned his first auto racing victory in Kansas City, Missouri. He went on to become a four-time winner of the Indianapolis 500 -- in 1961, 1964, 1967 and 1977.

1970 - Ernie Banks of the Chicago Cubs smacked home run number 500. He would get 12 more before his great career as first baseman (and shortstop) with the Cubbies came to a close in 1971.

1971 - The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger married Bianca Perez Morena de Macias. Mick couldn’t remember her whole name very well, so she became known as Bianca the world over.

1976 - Sixteen-year-old, racing-jockey Steve Cauthen rode in his first race. He finished far back in the pack at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY. However, Cauthen got his first winner just five days later.

1977 - The Eagles earned a gold record for the hit, Hotel California. The award was the second of three gold record singles for the group. The other million sellers were New Kid in Town and Heartache Tonight. Two number one songs by The Eagles -- Best of My Love and One of These Nights -- didn’t quite make the million-seller mark.

1978 - From the And You Thought We Had This Straightened Out By Now file: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that it would alternate men’s and women’s names in the naming of hurricanes. It was seen as an attempt at fair play. Hurricanes had been named for women for years, until NOAA succumbed to pressure from women’s groups who were demanding that Atlantic storms be given unisex names. “It’s not fair that women should get all the attention for causing damage and destruction,” one women’s activist claimed. David, Allen, Hugo, Mitch and Andrew agreed.

1985 - Lionel Richie received an honorary Doctor of Music degree from Tuskegee Institute in Alabama (his alma mater). Richie had put 14 hits on the pop charts in the 1980s, including one platinum smash, Endless Love (with Diana Ross) and four gold records (Truly, All Night Long, Hello and Say You, Say Me). All but one song (Se La) of the 14 charted made it to the top ten.

Birthdays
May 12th.

1812 - Edward Lear
illustrator, poet, champion of the limerick; died June 29, 1888; see Limerick Day [above]

1820 - Florence Nightingale
health activist, nurse: promoted the nursing profession, contributed to modern nursing procedures, founded Nightingale Training School for Nurses; author: Notes on Nursing; died Aug 13, 1910

1828 - Dante Rossetti
poet: The Blessed Damozel, Sister Helen, The House of Life; artist: The Annunciation; brother of poet Christina Rossetti; died Apr 9, 1882

1900 - Captain Mildred McAfee (Horton)
1st Director of U.S. Navy WAVES [Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service); Wellesley College President; Distinguished Service Medalist [1945]; died Sep 2, 1994

1907 - Katharine Hepburn
Academy Award-winning Actress: Morning Glory [1932-33], Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner [1967], The Lion in Winter [1968], On Golden Pond [1981]; Adam’s Rib, Pat and Mike, The African Queen, The Rainmaker, Rooster Cogburn, Suddenly Last Summer, Mary of Scotland, Love Affair; died June 29, 2003

1914 - Howard K. (Kingsbury) Smith
journalist, TV anchorman: ABC News; died Feb 15, 2002

1921 - (Otis W.) Joe Maphis
country singer with wife, Rose Lee: entertainer: Hometown Jamboree, Town Hall Party, Hee Haw; songwriter: Dim Lights Thick Smoke and Loud, Loud Music; died June 27, 1986

1922 - Bob Goldham
hockey: NHL: Toronto Maple Leafs, Chicago Blackhawks, Detroit Red Wings

1925 - Yogi (Lawrence Peter) Berra
Baseball Hall of Famer: catcher: NY Yankees [World Series: 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963/all-star: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962], NY Mets; manager: NY Yankees, NY Mets

1928 - Burt Bacharach
Oscar-winning composer [w/ Hal David]: Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head [1969]; Tony award for score for Promises, Promises; What the World Needs Now, Walk on By, Close to You, I Say a Little Prayer, Do You Know the Way to San Jose; Oscar-winning team w/wife, Carol Bayer Sager: Arthur’s Theme [1981]; That’s What Friends are For

1929 - Samuel Nujoma
President of Namibia [March 21, 1990-present]

1935 - Felipe (Felipe Rojas) Alou
baseball: SF Giants [World Series: 1962/all-star: 1962, 1966, 1968], Milwaukee Braves, Atlanta Braves, Oakland Athletics, NY Yankees, Montreal Expos, Milwaukee Brewers

1935 - John Bucyk
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, Boston Bruins [Lady Byng Trophy winner: 1971]

1936 - Tom Snyder
broadcast journalist: WNBC, KNBC; host: The Late Show with Tom Snyder, Tomorrow, Contact, The Tom Snyder Radio Show

1936 - Frank Stella
abstract artist, sculptor, painter: Empress of India, Guadalupe Island

1937 - George Carlin
comedian: The George Carlin Show, Award Theater, 1st host of Saturday Night Live, The Kraft Summer Music Hall, Wonderful W-I-N-O, Seven Dirty Words, actor: Prince of Tides, That Girl, Car Wash, Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure

1937 - Susan Hampshire
Emmy Award-winning actress: The Forsythe Saga [1969-70], The First Churchills [Masterpiece Theatre, 1970-71], Vanity Fair [Masterpiece Theatre, 1972-73]; The Story of David, Cry Terror, David Copperfield

1938 - Millie Perkins
actress: Wall Street, Ensign Pulver

1939 - Ronald L. Ziegler
journalist, Press Secretary for U.S. President Richard M. Nixon; died Feb 10, 2003

1942 - Ian Dury
singer: Rough Kids, Billy Bentley, Upminster Kid; songwriter: What a Waste, Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick, Sink My Boats, This is What We Find, Reasons to be Cheerful, Delusions of Grandeur, Dance of the Crackpots, The Body Song, Spasticus Autisticus, Profoundly in Love with Pandora; group: Ian Dury & The Blockheads: Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, Sweet Gene Vincent, Billericay Dickie, Paistow Patricia; actor: No. 1, Pirates, King of the Ghetto, Talk of the Devil, Rocinante, Hearts of Fire; died Mar 27, 2000

1942 - Ted (Theodore Rodger) Kubiak
baseball: KC Athletics, Oakland Athletics [World Series: 1972, 1973], Milwaukee Brewers, SL Cardinals, Texas Rangers, SD Padres

1943 - David Walker
musician: guitar: group: Gary Lewis & The Playboys: This Diamond Ring, Everybody Loves a Clown, She's Just My Style

1945 - Ian McLagan
musician: keyboards: solo LPs: Troublemaker, Bump in the Night; group: The Faces: Stay with Me, Debris, Cindy Incidentally, Pool Hall Richard, You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything

1948 - Lindsay Crouse
actress: The Juror, The Arrival, Desperate Hours, Places in the Heart, The Verdict, Slap Shot, House of Games, Eleanor & Franklin, All the President’s Men, Traps

1948 - Steve Winwood
singer: groups: Blind Faith; Traffic; Spencer Davis Group: Gimme Some Lovin’; solo: While You See a Chance; Don’t You Know What the Night Can Do, Higher Love, The Finer Things, Roll with It

1950 - Bruce Boxleitner
actor: Scarecrow and Mrs. King, The Babe

1950 - Pat (Patrick Leonard) Darcy
baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1975]

1950 - Billy Squier
singer: Everybody Wants You; wrote and sang on soundtrack: Fast Times at Ridgemont High

1958 - Kim Greist
actress: Homeward Bound series, Throw Momma from the Train, Brazil, Chicago Hope

1961 - Billy Duffy
musician: guitar: group: The Cult: Spiritwalker, Resurrection Joe, She Sells Security

1962 - Emilio Estevez
actor: Breakfast Club, Repo Man, Young Guns, Stakeout, The Mighty Ducks, Men at Work, Freejack; Martin Sheen’s son, Charlie’s brother, Paula Abdul’s ex

1966 - Stephen Baldwin
actor: Fled, The Usual Suspects, Under the Hula Moon, Threesome, The Great American Sex Scandal, Born on the Fourth of July, Home Boy, The Young Riders, The Prodigious Hickey, The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas; brother of actors Alec, William and Daniel Baldwin

1969 - Kim Fields
actress: The Facts of Life, Living Single, Baby, I’m Back.

Chart Toppers
May 12th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
Manana - Peggy Lee
The Dickey Bird Song - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn
Hughes)
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
Standing on the Corner - The Four Lads
The Wayward Wind - Gogi Grant
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Hello Dolly! - Louis Armstrong
Do You Want to Know a Secret - The Beatles
My Guy - Mary Wells
My Heart Skips a Beat - Buck Owens

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Betcha By Golly, Wow - The Stylistics
Grandma Harp - Merle Haggard

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
Lost in Love - Air Supply
Beneath Still Waters - Emmylou Harris

1988 Wishing Well - Terence Trent D’Arby
Anything for You - Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine
Pink Cadillac - Natalie Cole
Cry, Cry, Cry - Highway 101


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-12-2007, 11:00 PM
133rd day of 2007 - 232 remaining.

Sunday, May 13, 2007
LITTLE STEVIE WONDER DAY. ;)

Stevland Morris was born prematurely on this day in 1950. Too much oxygen in the incubator caused the baby to become permanently blind. However, this did not prove to be any kind of handicap to Stevland’s musical talents as a singer, songwriter and multiinstrumentalist.

At the tender age of ten, Little Stevie Wonder, as he was called by Berry Gordy at Motown, was discovered singing and playing the harmonica. The child prodigy got a little bigger and in his teen years recorded Fingertips (his first hit) and My Cherie Amour; co-wrote I was Made to Love Her, For Once in My Life and Tears of a Clown. If You Really Love Me was a #1 hit and Stevie was just 20 years old.

Stevie Wonder won an Oscar in 1984 (I Just Called to Say I Love You); induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989; and sixteen Grammy Awards. He has stood up for civil rights, campaigns against cancer, AIDS, drunk driving and the plight of Ethiopians.

As an adult, and no longer little, Stevie Wonder has been no less than wonderful.

Happy Birthday, Stevie!

Events
May 13th.


1821 - Samuel Rust of New York City patented the first practical printing press built in the U.S.

1854 - The first big American billiards match was held at Malcolm Hall in Syracuse, NY. Joseph White and George Smith participated in the event for a $200 prize. White pocketed the award as winner of the match.

1873 - Ludwig M. Wolf of Avon, CT patented the sewing machine lampholder. Up to that time, those who could afford it had hired pygmies from their local Lampholders-R-Us company to hold their sewing machine lamps. Those who could not afford that service had to sew with one hand while holding the lamp with the other. Certainly not convenient.

1918 - The first airmail postage stamps were issued in six, 16 and 24-cent denominations. Of course, airplanes weren’t that big a deal yet...

1938 - Louis Armstrong and his orchestra recorded the New Orleans jazz standard, When the Saints Go Marching In, on Decca Records.

1949 - The first gas turbine to pump natural gas was installed in Wilmar, AR. Please don’t forget. There will be a pop quiz later...

1954 - The Pajama Game made its debut on Broadway in New York City at the St. James Theatre. Harold Prince produced The Pajama Game, his first Broadway endeavor. The show ran for 1,063 performances. John Raitt and Janis Paige starred in the leading roles. Carol Haney came to national fame for her rendition of the song, Steam Heat. The movie version also starred Raitt -- along with Doris Day.

1967 - Mickey Mantle joined six other baseball legends as he hit home run number 500 -- in Yankee Stadium. He connected off of the ‘Junk Man’, Stu Miller.

1971 - Aretha Franklin, the ‘Queen of Soul’, received a gold record for her version of Bridge over Troubled Water, originally a Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel tune.

1973 - Tennis star Bobby Riggs defeated Margaret Court in a televised tennis match that was seen worldwide. The outrageous tennis hustler, however, didn’t fare so well against women’s tennis champion, Billy Jean King, in a much-hyped match at the Houston Astrodome. He lost, but helped bring women’s tennis to the forefront as a competitive sport with a growing legion of fans.

1982 - The Chicago Cubs became the first major-league baseball team to win 8,000 games. The Cubs beat the Houston Astros 5-0. Win number 8,000 came after playing 15,337 games in over 107 years. In the words of the Cubs’ legendary announcer, Harry Caray, “Holy Cow!” Now, if the Cubbies could just get into the World Series...

1984 - The Fantasticks, playing at the Sullivan Theatre in Greenwich Village in New York City, became the longest-running musical in theatre history with performance number 10,000 on this night. The Fantasticks opened on May 3, 1960.

1985 - Tony Perez became the oldest major-league baseball player to hit a grand slam home run. Perez hit the grand slam for the Cincinnati Reds -- helping the Reds to a 7-3 win over the Houston Astros. Perez was just a month shy of his 43rd birthday when he connected for the big dinger...

1985 - ‘The Boss’, Bruce Springsteen, married actress/model Julianne Phillips in ceremonies in Lake Oswego, OR. The couple went their separate ways in 1989. Springsteen’s hit, I’m on Fire, was in the top ten when the couple tied the wedding knot. Springsteen remarried in June of 1991, this time to a member of his E Street Band, Patti Scialfa. Despite his popularity, Springsteen has never had a number one song. His closest to the top of the pop music charts was a four-week stay at number two with Dancing in the Dark (June/July, 1984). Springsteen has had 11 hits in the top ten.

Birthdays
May 13th.

1842 - Arthur (Seymour) Sullivan
operetta composer [w/Sir William Gilbert]: H.M.S. Pinafore, The Mikado, Pirates of Penzance; died Nov 22, 1900

1911 - Robert Middleton (Samuel Messer)
actor: Harrad Experiment, The Law and Jake Wade, Court Jester, Desperate Hours, Career; died June 14, 1977

1911 - Maxine Sullivan (Marietta Williams)
singer: Loch Lomand, ****les and Mussels, If I Had a Ribbon Bow; films & stage: Goin’ Places, St. Louis Blues, Swingin’ the Dream, Midsummer Night’s Dream [w/Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman]; died Apr 7, 1987

1914 - Johnny ‘Johnnie’ Wright
country singer: duo: Johnnie and Jack: Poison Love, Crying Heart Blues; solo: Hello Vietnam; married to singer Kitty Wells since 1937

1914 - Joe Louis (Barrow)
‘The Brown Bomber’: boxer: world heavyweight champion [1937-1949]; died Apr 12, 1981

1923 - Bea (Beatrice) Arthur (Bernice Frankel)
actress: The Golden Girls, Maude, Mame

1927 - Herbert Ross
director: True Colors, My Blue Heaven, Steel Magnolias, Dancers, Footloose, Pennies from Heaven, California Suite, The Turning Point, The Goodbye Girl, The Sunshine Boys, Funny Lady, The Owl and the Pussycat; actor, director: Play It Again, Sam, Goodbye, Mr. Chips; died Oct 9, 2001

1933 - Johnny (John Junior) Roseboro
baseball: catcher: Brooklyn Dodgers, LA Dodgers [all-star: 1958, 1961, 1962/World Series: 1959, 1963, 1965, 1966], Minnesota Twins [all-star: 1969], Washington Senators; died Aug 16, 2002

1937 - Zohra Lampert
actress: Alan & Naomi, Splendor in the Grass

1939 - Harvey Keitel
actor: Smoke, Pulp Fiction, Rising Sun, The Piano, Sister Act, Thelma and Louise, Bugsy, The Two Jakes, The Last Temptation of Christ, Death Watch, Blue Collar, Taxi Driver, Mother, Jugs and Speed, Shining Star, Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, Mean Streets, Holy Smoke, U-571

1941 - Senta Berger
actress: The Victors, See How They Run, The Quiller Memorandum, If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium

1941 - Ritchie Valens (Richard Steven Valenzuela)
singer: Donna, La Bamba; film biography: La Bamba; killed in plane crash Feb 3, 1959

1943 - Mary Wells
singer: My Guy, Two Lovers, You Beat Me to the Punch, The One Who Really Loves You; died July 26, 1992

1946 - Mike Chernoff
hockey: NHL: Minnesota North Stars

1946 - Danny Klein
musician: bass: group: The J. Geils Band: Give It to Me, Must Have Got Lost, One Last Kiss, Freeze-Frame, Centerfold, Angel in Blue, Land of a 1000 Dances

1946 - Tim Pigott-Smith
actor: The Jewel in the Crown, Remains of the Day

1947 - (Pete) Overend Watts
musician: bass: group: Mott the Hoople: All the Young Dudes, Ballad of Mott, All the Way to Memphis, Saturday Gigs

1949 - Franklyn Ajaye
actor: The Wrong Guys, Fraternity Vacation, The Jazz Singer, Convoy, Car Wash, Keep on Truckin’

1950 - Stevie Wonder
singer: see Little Stevie Wonder Day [above]

1950 - Bobby Valentine
baseball: baseball: manager: Texas Rangers, NY Mets

1951 - Paul Thompson
musician: drums: group: Roxy Music: Virginia Plain, Pyjamarama, Do the Strand, Editions of You, In Every Dream a Heartache, Street Life, All I Want is You, Out of the Blue

1958 - Frances Barber
actress: A Zed & Two Noughts, We Think the World of You, Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, Home Sweet Home

1961 - Dennis Rodman
‘The Worm’: basketball: Chicago Bulls; actor: Double Team, S.O.F. Special Ops Force, Simon Sez

1964 - Lorraine McIntosh
singer: group: Deacon Blue: Dignity, Real Gone Kid, Raintown, Twist And Shout, Your Town, Love And Regret.

Chart Toppers
May 13th.

1949 Cruising Down the River - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The
Skyliners)
Forever and Ever - Perry Como
Careless Hands - Mel Torme
Lovesick Blues - Hank Williams

1957 School Day - Chuck Berry
A White Sport Coat (And a Pink Carnation) - Marty Robbins
So Rare - Jimmy Dorsey
All Shook Up - Elvis Presley

1965 Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter - Herman’s Hermits
Count Me In - Gary Lewis & The Playboys
Ticket to Ride - The Beatles
Girl on the Billboard - Del Reeves

1973 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree - Dawn featuring Tony
Orlando
You are the Sunshine of My Life - Stevie Wonder
Little Willy - The Sweet
Come Live with Me - Roy Clark

1981 Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Bette Davis Eyes - Kim Carnes
Am I Losing You - Ronnie Milsap

1989 I’ll Be There for You - Bon Jovi
Real Love - Jody Watley
Forever Your Girl - Paula Abdul
Is It Still Over? - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-13-2007, 11:00 PM
134th day of 2007 - 231 remaining.

Monday, May 14, 2007
JAMESTOWN DAY. :)

Three very small ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery, sailed across the ocean blue from Plymouth, England to a place the ship�s crew and passengers called Jamestown on this day in 1607.

If you have ever been to today�s Jamestown and had the chance to climb aboard the restored ships, you would wonder how anyone could have survived that historic trip in such tiny, cramped quarters. We can only assume that some of us had ancestors who were very, very short.

This hearty group of Virginia Company settlers was chartered by England�s King James I, therefore, the name, Jamestown, Virginia. The group was led by Captain John Smith of Pocahontas fame and Christopher Newport.

Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement in what is now the United States. It became the capital of Virginia and remained so through 1699.

Events
May 14th.

1862 - Adolphe Nicole of Switzerland patented the chronograph -- a timepiece that allows for split-second timing of sporting events.

1874 - McGill University (of Canada) and Harvard University met on Jarvis Field, Cambridge, MA for the the first game of intercollegiate football in America.

1878 - The trademarked name Vaseline (for a brand of petroleum jelly) was registered by Robert A. Chesebrough. You have probably heard of his Chesebrough-Pond�s company.

1897 - A statue of George Washington was unveiled in Philadelphia, PA. To commemorate the occasion, John Philip Sousa�s march, The Stars and Stripes Forever, was performed. It was the first public performance for Sousa�s march and the President of the U.S., William McKinley, was in the audience.

1904 - The Olympic Games opened in St. Louis, MO. It marked the first time that the games were held in the United States.

1913 - John D. Rockefeller made the largest gift of money (to that time) by establishing the Rockefeller Foundation for $100,000,000. The foundation promotes �the well-being of mankind throughout the world.�

1937 - Duke Ellington and his band recorded the classic, Caravan, for Brunswick Records.

1945 - The Sparrow and the Hawk, a serial for kids, was first broadcast over CBS radio.

1945 - Tennessee Jed made his debut on ABC radio. Johnny Thomas played the part of Tennessee Jed Sloan.

1957 - The musical, New Girl in Town, opened at the 46th Street Theatre in New York City. Thelma Ritter and Gwen Verdon starred in the Broadway adaptation of Eugene O�Neill�s Anna Christie. New Girl in Town had a run of 431 performances.

1960 - Bally Ache, the winner of the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore, MD, was sold for $1,250,000. Wonder what he would have brought with a name change...

1969 - Jacqueline Susann�s second novel, The Love Machine, was published by Simon and Schuster. It went on to become a huge seller, and further established Susann as a writer of intense, erotic novels, several of which were turned into successful movies for TV.

1971 - The Honey Cone received a gold record for the single, Want Ads. The female soul trio was formed in Los Angeles in 1969 and scored two million-sellers, Want Ads and Stick Up. The trio had a total of four songs on the charts that were moderate hits. Only Want Ads, however, made it to the number one position. Hey, that�s the latest, I�m Casey Kasem...

1985 - The third most widely-used form of contraception in the U.S. celebrated its 25th birthday. The Pill became the leading form of contraception and continues to be the focus of controversy. Even country stars Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty sang a duet that turned into a big, hit song titled, The Pill.

1985 - The first McDonald�s restaurant -- in Des Plaines, IL -- became the first museum of the fast-food business. McMannequins, McPosters and loads of McPhotos display years of hamburger McProgress!

Birthdays
May 14th.

1727 - Thomas Gainsborough
artist: The Blue Boy, The Watering Place; died Aug 2, 1788

1900 - Billie Dove (Lilian Bohny)
actress: All the Brothers were Valiant, The Black Pirate; died Dec 31, 1997

1916 - Skip (Lloyd) Martin
bandleader, composer, arranger: Hammer Blow [from Mike Hammer], Singin� in the Rain, Guys and Dolls, April Love, Funny Face, Silk Stockings, Les Girls; died in Feb 1976

1917 - Norman Luboff
choral leader: The Norman Luboff Choir; died Sep 22, 1987

1921 - Richard Deacon
actor: The Dick Van Dyke Show, B.J. and the Bear, Leave It to Beaver, Carousel, Francis in the Haunted House, The Patsy, Bad Manners, Blackbeard�s Ghost; died Aug 8, 1984

1925 - Al Porcino
jazz musician: trumpet: played with Louis Prima, Tommy Dorsey, Georgie Auld, Gene Krupa, Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Charlie Parker, Count Basie, Frank Sinatra, Don Costa, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Jerry Lewis, Judy Garland, Peggy Lee, Buddy Rich, Chuck Mangione, Mel Torme

1925 - Les (John Lester) Moss
baseball: catcher: SL Browns, Boston Red Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox

1925 - Patrice Munsel
soprano: Metropolitan Opera diva [at age 17]; actress: The Great Waltz, Melba; radio performer: The Great Sopranos - Voices of Firestone Classic Performances; radio host: The Patrice Munsel Show

1929 - Gump (Lorne John) Worsley
Hockey Hall of Famer: goaltender: New York [Calder Trophy as NHL�s top rookie: 1953], Montreal Canadians [Stanley Cup: 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969/Vezina Trophy winner: 1964, 1966], Minnesota North Stars: consented to wear a mask during his last season in NHL; physical resemblance to a popular comic strip character earned him the nickname

1936 - Bobby Darin (Cassotto)
Grammy Award-winning singer: Mack the Knife [1959]; Splish Splash, Dream Lover, You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby, Things, If I Were a Carpenter; inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [1990]; actor: Captain Newman, M.D., If a Man Answers, Come September; died Dec 20, 1973

1936 - Dick (Richard Dalton) Howser
baseball: KC Athletics [all-star: 1961], Cleveland Indians, NY Yankees; manager: NY Yankees, KC Royals:: 404-365 record [.525], 2 division titles, World Championship [1985], uniform [#10] was 1st number retired by Royals retired by Royals; died June 17, 1987

1942 - Tony Perez (Atanasio P�rez Regal)
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [all-star: 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1976/World Series: 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976], Montreal Expos, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies [World Series: 1983]; manager: Cincinnati Reds

1943 - Jack Bruce
musician: bass: group: Cream: Sunshine of Your Love, White Room, Crossroads; group: Graham Bond Organization; solo: Themes for an Imaginary Western

1943 - Derek Leckenby
musician: guitar: group: Herman�s Hermits: Mrs. Brown You�ve Got a Lovely Daughter, I�m Henry VIII I Am

1944 - George Lucas (George Walton Lucas Jr.)
film producer, director: Star Wars series, Indiana Jones series, American Graffiti

1944 - Troy Shondell
singer: This Time

1946 - Gene Cornish
musician: guitar: group: The Young Rascals/Rascals: Groovin�, How Can I Be Sure, A Beautiful Morning, People Got to Be Free

1947 - Dick (Richard William) Tidrow
baseball: pitcher: Cleveland Indians, NY Yankees [World Series: 1976, 1977, 1978], Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, NY Mets

1948 - Dave (David Eugene) LaRoche
baseball: pitcher: California Angels [all-star: 1977], Minnesota Twins, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1976], NY Yankees [World Series: 1981]

1948 - Tom Gilmore
hockey: WHA: LA Sharks, Edmonton Oilers

1951 - Pierre Plante
hockey: NHL: Philadelphia Flyers, SL Blues, Chicago Blackhawks, NY Rangers, Quebec Nordiques

1952 - David Byrne
singer: group: Talking Heads: Love Goes to Building on Fire; composer for film: True Stories

1952 - Robert Zemeckis
Academy Award-winning director: Forrest Gump [1994]; Death Becomes Her, Back to the Future trilogy, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Romancing the Stone, Used Cars, I Wanna Hold Your Hand; script writer [w/Bob Gale]: 1941; executive producer: Tales from the Crypt

1953 - Tom Cochrane
musician: guitar: group: Red Rider: White Hot, Lunatic Fringe, Young Thing, The Untouchable One, Good Times; solo: Life is a Highway, Sinking Like a Sunset, I Wish You Well

1962 - Ian Astbury
singer: group: The Cult: Spiritwalker, Resurrection Joe, She Sells Sanctuary

1966 - Fabrice Morvan
performer, lip-syncer: group: Milli Vanilli: Girl I�m Gonna Miss You, Baby Don't Forget My Number, Blame It on the Rain

1969 - Danny Wood
singer: group: New Kids On the Block: Step by Step, You Got It (The Right Stuff), I�ll Be Loving You (Forever), Cover Girl, Didn�t I (Blow Your Mind), Please Don�t Go Girl, Tonight, This One�s for the Children, Valentine Girl, Let�s Try It Again, Hangin� Tough, If You Go Away, Baby, I Believe in You, Call It What You Want.

Chart Toppers
May 14th.

1950 My Foolish Heart - The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra (vocal: Eileen Wilson)
It Isn�t Fair - The Sammy Kaye Orchestra (vocal: Don Cornell)
The Third Man Theme - Alton Karas
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 All I Have to Do is Dream - The Everly Brothers
Wear My Ring Around Your Neck - Elvis Presley
Return to Me - Dean Martin
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 Monday Monday - The Mamas & The Papas
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 - Bob Dylan
Kicks - Paul Revere & The Raiders
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 The Loco-Motion - Grand Funk
The Streak - Ray Stevens
Dancing Machine - The Jackson 5
Is It Wrong (For Loving You) - Sonny James

1982 Chariots of Fire - Titles - Vangelis
Ebony and Ivory - Paul McCartney with Stevie Wonder
Don�t Talk to Strangers - Rick Springfield
Always on My Mind - Willie Nelson

1990 Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinead O�Connor
Vogue - Madonna
All I Wanna Do is Make Love to You - Heart
Help Me Hold On - Travis Tritt


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they�d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-14-2007, 11:00 PM
135th day of 2007 - 230 remaining.

Tuesday, May 15, 2007
WIZ DAY. :D

Today is the anniversary of the birth of Lyman Frank Baum, who was born in 1856. Lyman grew up to become a newspaperman and the author of one of the most famous children’s stories in recent history. Lyman Baum wrote The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Baum wrote a series of Oz books, but this was the most famous.

He also adapted the story into a musical play. It then became the basis for the 1939 MGM musical, The Wizard of Oz, starring Judy Garland, Margaret Hamilton, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Frank Morgan, and Billy Burke among others. The film, a classic, was nominated for six Academy Awards but won only two (Best Song: Over the Rainbow and Best Score).

Lyman Frank Baum’s adaptation was adapted once again in 1978 as a Broadway show and film, The Wiz, featuring an all-black cast.

Events
May 15th.

1862 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture was established by President Abraham Lincoln on this day.

1918 - Regular airmail service between New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. began under the direction of the Post Office Department, a forerunner of the United States Postal Service.

1926 - The New York Rangers became the newest franchise to be awarded by the National Hockey League. Two years later, the Rangers won their first Stanley Cup.

1930 - Ellen Church became the first stewardess for an airline. Church served passengers flying between San Francisco, California and Cheyenne, Wyoming on United Airlines. She also served chicken, fruit salad and rolls. The term ‘stewardess’ has since been banished. The men and women who serve on airlines worldwide are known as flight attendants. Remember, the exits are clearly marked and life support cushions are located beneath the web site. We’ll begin beverage service in a few moments. Please stay in your seat with your belt securely fastened and your tray table in the upright, locked position...

1933 - Irna Phillips, an NBC Blue network program-features writer, starred in the role of Mother Moran in the radio program, Today’s Children, which was heard for the first time this day.

1938 - Guy Lombardo and his orchestra recorded Ride, Tenderfoot, Ride, the group’s last side for Victor Records. Lombardo took disc number 25861 and moved the Royal Canadians over to Decca Records to make “the sweetest sound this side of heaven.”

1940 - Nylon hose went on sale at stores throughout the United States.

1941 - Joe DiMaggio began his historic major-league hitting streak (56 games). The New York Yankees got Joltin’ Joe off to a rather bad start, however, as they lost to the Chicago White Sox 13-1 at Yankee Stadium.

1953 - World heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano collected his 44th pro boxing victory on this night, knocking out former champ, Jersey Joe Walcott, at Chicago Stadium in 2 minutes, 25 seconds of the first round.

1962 - After five years on Wagon Train, Robert Horton let his performing contract expire and left the popular TV series. Robert Fuller replaced Horton as the trail scout who rode with wagon master Chris Hale, played by actor John McIntire.

1964 - The Smothers Brothers, Dick and Tom, gave their first concert in Carnegie Hall in New York City.

1970 - Close to You, the Carpenter’s second album and the one that launched them to meteoric fame, was released by A&M Records. The title song, (They Long to Be) Close to You, became a pop music standard and the first of six million-sellers in a row for Karen and Richard. In all, The Carpenters would have 10 gold records for singles and a dozen top ten hits to their credit. The duo won Best New Artist honors at the Grammy Awards in 1970.

1972 - Glen Campbell earned a gold record for his Greatest Hits album on this day.

1981 - Len Barker, the 25-year-old pitching sensation of the Cleveland Indians, became the tenth major-league hurler to toss a perfect game. Barker led the Indians past the Toronto Blue Jays, 3-0. Barker was absolutely perfect in this game: no runs, no hits, no walks, no visits to the mound by the manager and no stray hot-dog wrappers on the field.

1985 - Prince Michael of Moldavia and Amanda Carrington tied the knot in wedded bliss on the nighttime soap opera, Dynasty. The series was canceled shortly after the wedding and Joan Collins says she hasn’t gotten a letter or anything from the couple.

Birthdays
May 15th.




1856 - Lyman Frank Baum
newspaperman, author: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; died May 5, 1919; see Wiz Day [above]

1890 - Katherine Anne Porter
Pulitzer Prize-winning writer: Collected Short Stories [1965]; Ship of Fools; died Sep 18,1980

1902 - Richard Joseph Daley
‘The Boss’: politician: former mayor of Chicago; died Dec 20, 1976

1905 - Joseph (Cheshire) Cotten
actor: Citizen Kane, The Third Man, Duel in the Sun, Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte, Tora Tora Tora, The Philadelphia Story, Once More with Feeling; died Feb 6, 1994

1909 - James (Neville) Mason
actor: A Star is Born, Georgy Girl, The Verdict, The Boys from Brazil, Charade, The Desert Fox, Island in the Sun, Jesus of Nazareth, North by Northwest, Lolita; died July 27, 1984

1910 - Constance Cummings (Halverstadt)
Tony Award-winning actress: Wings; Blithe Spirit, Busman’s Honeymoon; died Nov 23, 2005

1911 - Max (Rudolf) Frisch
author: Homo Faber, I’m Not Stiller, Juerg Reinhardt; playwright: The Firebugs, Andorra; died Apr 4, 1991

1914 - Walter ‘Turk’ Broda
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL Vezina Trophy [1941, 1948, 1951]: Toronto Maple Leafs, goaltender for five Stanley Cup wins; died Oct 17, 1972

1918 - Eddy (Richard Edward) Arnold
‘The Tennessee Plowboy’: Country Music Hall of Famer: Make the World Go Away, Kentucky Waltz, The Last Word in Lonesome is Me, I Want to Go with You, I Wouldn’t Know Where to Begin, Bouquet of Roses; TV host

1923 - Richard Avedon
photographer: famous for his 1960s and ’70s ‘up-against-the-wall’ pictures of celebrities and politicians

1923 - Ellis Larkins
pianist: favorite accompanist of: Mildred Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, Joe Williams; died Sep 29, 2002

1930 - Jasper Johns
sculptor, painter: Flag, Face with Watch, After Holbein, Grey Numbers

1931 - Ken Venturi
golf champion: U.S. Open [1964]

1936 - Anna Maria Alberghetti
singer, Tony Award-winning actress: Carnival [1962]; Cinderfella

1936 - Paul Zindel
writer: The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds; died Mar 27, 2003

1937 - Trini López
singer: If I Had a Hammer, Lemon Tree, I’m Comin’ Home Cindy; actor: The Dirty Dozen

1938 - Lenny Welch
singer: Since I Fell for You, Ebb Tide, Breaking Up is Hard to Do

1939 - Dudley Wysong
golf: two-time winer on PGA Tour; vice president: PGA of America; died Mar 29, 1998

1940 - Lainie Kazan
singer, actress: Beaches, My Favorite Year

1940 - Don Nelson
basketball: coach: Golden State Warriors

1943 - David Cronenberg
director: Crash, M Butterfly, Dead Ringers, The Fly, Dead Zone, Fast Company, They Came from Within

1945 - Jerry Quarry
boxing: heavyweight champ: record: 53-9-4, 33 KO’s

1947 - Graham Goble
musician: guitar: group: Little River Band: It’s a Long Way There, Help is on Its Way, Reminiscing, Lady, Lonesome Loser, Cool Change, The Night Owls, Take It Easy on Me

1948 - Brian Eno (Brian Peter George St. John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno)
musician: synthesizer: Roxy Music [cofounder]; record producer: Seven Deadly Finns; songwriter [w/David Bowie]: Once in a Lifetime

1951 - Wally Chambers
football: Chicago Bears [Pro Bowl: 1974]

1953 - George (Howard) Brett
Baseball Hall of Famer:: Kansas City Royals [all-star: 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988/World Series: 1980, 1985/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1980], 1980 batting average: .390

1953 - Pat Hickey
hockey: NHL: NY Rangers, Colorado Rockies, Toronto Maple Leafs, Quebec Nordiques, SL Blues

1953 - Mike Oldfield
composer, musician: Tubular Bells; film score: Killing Fields

1955 - Lee Horsley
actor: Unlawful Passage, French Silk, Danielle Steele’s Palomino, Sword & the Sorcerer, Nero Wolfe, Hawkeye, Paradise, North and South, Book II, Bodies of Evidence.

Chart Toppers
May 15th.

1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
On Top of Old Smokey - The Weavers (vocal: Terry Gilkyson)
Cold, Cold Heart - Hank Williams

1959 The Happy Organ - Dave ‘Baby’ Cortez
Sorry (I Ran All the Way Home) - The Impalas
Kookie, Kookie (Lend Me Your Comb) - Edward Byrnes & Connie
Stevens
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 The Happening - The Supremes
Sweet Soul Music - Arthur Conley
Groovin’ - The Young Rascals
Sam’s Place - Buck Owens

1975 He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) - Tony Orlando & Dawn
Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender
Jackie Blue - Ozark Mountain Daredevils
She’s Actin’ Single (I’m Drinkin’ Doubles) - Gary Stewart

1983 Beat It - Michael Jackson
Let’s Dance - David Bowie
Overkill - Men at Work
Whatever Happened to Old Fashioned Love - B.J. Thomas

1991 Joyride - Roxette
I Like the Way (The Kissing Game) - Hi-Five
Here We Go - C + C Music Factory Presents Freedom Williams and Zelma
Davis
If I Know Me - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-15-2007, 11:00 PM
136th day of 2007 - 229 remaining.

Wednesday, May 16, 2007
FIRST NICKEL DAY . :)

The U.S. Treasury Department added another coin to American currency by authorizing the minting of the nickel, a five-cent coin, on this day in 1866. On its face was a shield, while on the
reverse was the number From 1883 until 1912, the head of Liberty was on the obverse while the Roman numeral 5 was on the reverse side. The current nickel is the Jefferson nickel, minted since 1938. The Jefferson nickel has a profile of none other than Thomas Jefferson on the face and a picture of his home, Monticello, on the flip side.

Today’s nickel is made of only 25 percent nickel and 75 percent copper. Its official name is the five-cent piece. And that’s the latest from the 440 numismatic department.

Events
May 16th.

1910 - The U.S. Bureau of Mines was authorized by the U.S. Congress.

1914 - The AHPA was formed in Kansas City, Kansas. Now, don’t throw a fit when we tell you that AHPA is the American Horseshoe Pitchers Association.

1929 - The first Academy Awards were presented on this night, hosted by Douglas Fairbanks and William C. de Mille. This first awards ceremony of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles. It attracted an audience of 200 people. (The statuette we know so well as Oscar was not included in this first presentation for films made in 1927-1928. Oscar didn’t make an appearance until 1931.) Janet Gaynor was named Best Actress for her performance in Seventh Heaven, which also won the Best Director/Dramatic Picture for Frank Borzage, and the Best Writing/Adaptation for Benjamin Glazer. Lewis Milestone was named Best Director/Comedy Picture for Two Arabian Knights. Emil Jannings received two Best Actor awards, one for the 1927 flick, The Way of All Flesh, the other for The Last Command (1928) and Wings was selected as Best Film Production. A second Best Film award was presented to Sunrise for Unique and Artistic Production. It also won for Best Cinematography (Charles Rosher and Karl Struss). Other countries honor their film industry each year, too. In Germany, the Oscar is called the Bambi for outstanding motion pictures. In Finland, the award is called the Snosiki. Two thumbs up for the movies!

1929 - Paul Whiteman and his orchestra backed Bing Crosby for the tune, Sposin’, which ‘Der Bingle’ recorded for Columbia Records.

1939 - The Philadelphia Athletics and the Cleveland Indians met at Shibe Park in Philadelphia for the first baseball game to be played under the lights in the American League. The Indians beat Philly 8-3 in 10 innings.

1946 - The Irving Berlin musical, Annie Get Your Gun, at New York’s Imperial Theatre. Once of the most successful shows presented on a Broadway stage, the show ran for 1,147 performances.

1953 - Bill Haley and His Comets made it to the Billboard music charts for the first time with Crazy Man Crazy. The tune went to number six and became the first rock ’n’ roll record to make the pop music chart.

1960 - A research study reported that TV commercials “in living color” were over three times more effective than black and white commercials.

1965 - The Roar of the Greasepaint, The Smell of the Crowd, a Broadway musical starring Anthony Newley, made its premiere at the Shubert Theatre in New York City. Cyril Ritchard appeared in the production which entertained audiences for 231 performances.

1971 - An ounce of first-class mail rocketed to eight cents for delivery -- two cents more than the previous stamp.

1981 - Bette Davis Eyes, by Kim Carnes, climbed to the top spot of the pop music chart and stayed there for five straight weeks, took a week off (replaced by Stars on 45 Medley by Stars on 45) and came back to number one for four more weeks! It was, obviously, a gold record winner and was played over and over and over for 20 weeks before becoming an instant oldie but goodie. Bette Davis Eyes, incidentally, was written in part by Jackie DeShannon, who had two top ten hits in the 1960s: What the World Needs Now is Love in 1965 and the million-seller, Put a Little Love in Your Heart, in 1969.

1985 - Michael ‘Air’ Jordan was named Rookie of the Year in the National Basketball Association. Jordan of the Chicago Bulls was the number three draft choice. At the time, he was third in the league scoring with a 28.2 average and fourth in steals with 2.39 per game.

1987 - It was a grand day in New York Harbor. Bobro 400, a huge barge, set sail within eyesight of the Statue of Liberty with 3,200 tons of garbage that nobody wanted. The floating trash heap soon became America’s most well-traveled garbage can as it began an eight-week, 6,000 mile odyssey in search of a willing dumping site. Bobro 400 returned to New York Harbor after the lengthy journey -- and brought all that garbage back with it!

1990 - The entertainer who could do it all, Sammy Davis Jr., died this day, in Beverly Hills, California, USA. From vaudeville at age three (with his father and uncle) to the star of Broadway’s "Mr. Wonderful", from Las Vegas nightclubs to hit records, the actor, singer, dancer, impersonator, and musician performed his way into the hearts of young and old everywhere. The world mourned the passing of Sammy Davis, Jr. at age 64 of throat cancer.


Birthdays
May 16th.

1801 - William Seward
U.S. Secretary of State: negotiated purchase of Alaska from Russia for $7,200,000 [Seward’s Folly]; died Oct 10, 1872

1804 - Elizabeth Palmer Peabody
educator: established 1st kindergarten in U.S. [1860]; author, publisher: The Dial literary magazine, Kindergarten Messenger; sister-in-law of Nathaniel Hawthorne; died Jan 3, 1894

1905 - Henry (Jaynes) Fonda
Academy Award-winning actor: On Golden Pond [1981]; Grapes of Wrath, Advice and Consent, Mister Roberts, Young Mr. Lincoln; father of Jane & Peter Fonda; died Aug 12, 1982

1912 - Studs (Louis) Terkel
writer: Hard Times, Working

1913 - Woody (Woodrow Charles) Herman
bandleader: Woodchopper’s Ball, The Sheik of Araby, Chloe, Caldonia; died Oct 29, 1987

1919 - (Wladziu Valentino) Liberace
concert pianist & showman: The Liberace Show; Las Vegas entertainer; died Feb 4, 1987

1922 - Eddie Bert
jazz musician: trombone

1926 - Rube (Albert Bluford) Walker
baseball: catcher: Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers [World Series: 1956], LA Dodgers; died Dec 12, 1992

1928 - Billy (Alfred Manuel) Martin
baseball: played and managed (5 times) the New York Yankees; also managed Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, Texas Rangers and Oakland A’s; died Dec 25, 1989

1930 - Betty Carter (Lillie Mae Jones)
jazz singer: toured with Lionel Hampton & Miles Davis; died Sep 26, 1998

1937 - Yvonne Craig
actress, dancer: Batman [TV], Barbara Gordon/Batgirl [TV], Digging Up Business, It Happened at the World’s Fair, The Young Land, Mars Needs Women

1943 - Donny Anderson
football: Green Bay Packers: running back, punter: Super Bowls I & II

1947 - Barbara Lee (Jones)
singer: group: The Chiffons: He’s So Fine, One Fine Day, Sweet Talkin’ Guy; died May 15, 1992

1947 - Bill Smitrovich
actor: Crime Story, Life Goes On, The Trigger Effect, Bodily Harm, Crazy People, Renegades, A Killing Affair, Splash, Manhunter, The Practice

1947 - Darrel Sweet
musician: drums, singer: group: Nazareth: LPs: Love Hurts, Snaz; died Apr 30, 1999

1948 - Jim Langer
Pro Football Hall of Famer: Miami Dolphins guard & center: Super Bowls VI, VII, VIII

1949 - Rick (Rickey Eugene) Reuschel
baseball: pitcher: Chicago Cubs [all-star: 1977], NY Yankees [World Series: 1981], Pittsburgh Pirates [all-star: 1987], SF Giants [all-star: 1989/World Series: 1989]

1953 - Pierce Brosnan
actor: Mrs. Doubtfire, Remington Steele, The Manions of America, Noble House, The Heist, Detonator, The Fourth Protocol, Don’t Talk to Strangers, The Thomas Crown Affair [1999], The Tailor of Panama; Bond ... James Bond: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World is Not Enough

1953 - Rick (Richard Alan) Rhoden
baseball: pitcher: LA Dodgers [all-star: 1976/World Series: 1977], Pittsburgh Pirates [all-star: 1986], NY Yankees, Houston Astros

1955 - Olga Korbut
Olympic Gold [3] Medalist: gymnast [1972]

1955 - (Mary) Debra Winger
actress: Forget Paris, Shadowlands, A Dangerous Woman, Leap of Faith, Legal Eagles, Terms of Endearment, An Officer and a Gentleman, Urban Cowboy, French Postcards, Slumber Party ’57, Wonder Woman

1958 - Glenn Gregory
singer: group: Heaven 17: We Don’t Need This Fascist Groove Thang, Temptation, Crushed by the Wheels of Industry, Soul Deep, The Foolish Thing to Do; on soundtrack of film: Insignificance

1959 - Mare Winningham
Emmy Award-winning [supporting] actress: Amber Waves [1979-1980], George Wallace [1997-1998]; The Boys Next Door, Wyatt Earp, Fatal Exposure, Turner and Hooch, St. Elmo’s Fire, The Thorn Birds

1966 - Janet Jackson
singer: Again, Control, Miss You Much, That’s the Way Love Goes, What Have You Done for Me Lately; LPs: Janet Jackson, Dream Street, Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation 1814, janet, Design of a Decade, The Velvet Rope [has sold some 40-million albums worldwide]; actress: Good Times, Fame, Diff’rent Strokes; Michael’s sister

1968 - Ralph Tresvant
singer: group: New Edition: Candy Girl, Cool It Now, Mr. Telephone Man

1969 - Tracey Gold
actress: Shirley, Goodnight Beantown, Growing Pains; TV host: That’s Incredible

1970 - Gabriela Sabatini
tennis champion: U.S. Open [1990]

Chart Toppers
May 16th.

1944 Long Ago and Far Away - Helen Forrest & Dick Haymes
I’ll Get By - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Dick Haymes)
San Fernando Valley - Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Blue Tango - The Leroy Anderson Orchestra
Kiss of Fire - Georgia Gibbs
Blacksmith Blues - Ella Mae Morse
The Wild Side of Life - Hank Thompson

1960 Stuck on You - Elvis Presley
Cathy’s Clown - The Everly Brothers
Night - Jackie Wilson
Please Help Me, I’m Falling - Hank Lockin

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Tighten Up - Archie Bell & The Drells
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Hugo Montenegro
Have a Little Faith - David Houston

1976 Boogie Fever - Sylvers
Silly Love Songs - Wings
Fooled Around and Fell in Love - Elvin Bishop
What Goes on When the Sun Goes Down - Ronnie Milsap

1984 Hello - Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now - The Thompson Twins
Let’s Hear It for the Boy - Deniece Williams
To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before - Julio Iglesias & Willie Nelson


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-16-2007, 11:00 PM
137th day of 2007 - 228 remaining.

Thursday, May 17, 2007
STOCK EXCHANGE DAY. :)

On this day in 1792, twenty-four brokers sat down to fix rates for commissions on stocks and bonds. From that agreement came what has been known since as the New York Stock Exchange or Wall Street.

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is located in the financial district, an area in lower Manhattan, on a street named after a defensive wall built around 1650. Wall Street became interchangeable with the Stock Exchange. The original brokers’ meeting place was quite different from today’s noisy, crowded, high-energy floor. In bad weather, they met at a coffee house and when the day was sunny, the brokers sat under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street to conduct their business.

There are now over 51 million individual investors and 10,000 institutional investors who are represented on the floor of the NYSE by 480 member-trader firms. The NYSE is respected throughout the world and attracts investors from many countries.

Events
May 17th.

1875 - Oliver Lewis rode Aristides winning a purse of $2,850 in the first running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY. Aristides won the one and a half mile Run for the Roses in a time of 2 minutes, 37-3/4 seconds.

1877 - Edwin T. Holmes of Boston, MA. installed the first telephone switchboard burglar alarm. We imagined that it was to keep burglars from starting their own phone companies...

1933 - Country singer Jimmie Rodgers began to record a series of 24 songs for RCA Victor Records on this day. Rodgers was in failing health at the beginning of the session, but persevered to complete the job at hand. The singing star died nine days later (he was 35). Jimmie Rodgers was born in 1897 and was known as the Blue Yodeler and the Singing Brakeman. Rodgers was the first member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, elected in 1961 (along with Fred Rose and Hank Williams). His recording career began in 1927. His yodel became a trademark of his music. Jimmie Rodgers recorded over 100 songs and sold millions of 78 RPM records. His songs were about the Depression and many were about trains. Brakeman’s Blues, Blue Yodel, Tuck Away My Lonesome Blues and his famous ‘T’ for Texas are all classics. He died of tuberculosis.

1938 - The NBC Blue network presented Information Please for the first time. The radio quiz show was moderated by Clifton Fadiman.

1939 - The Glen Island Casino in New Rochelle, NY was the scene of a memorable dual-network radio broadcast of Glenn Miller and his orchestra. Both NBC and Mutual carried the event, which was attended by 1,800 people in the casino ballroom.

1956 - The first synthetic mica (synthamica) was offered for sale -- in Caldwell Township, NJ. Mica is a crystal-like substance used in electronic applications. It aids in resisting heat and electricity. You’ll find a wide variety of mica capacitors inside your radio, TV, computer, microwave, stereo, telephone and hundreds of other electronic gizmos.

1971 - The musical, Godspell, opened this night at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City. Godspell featured the song Day by Day (a top-15 hit in 1972). The rock musical that featured Robin Lamont played for 2,651 performances and was the third longest-running off-Broadway production at the time.

1975 - NBC-TV paid a whopping $5,000,000 for the rights to show Gone with the Wind just one time. It was the top price paid for a single opportunity to show a film on television.

1975 - Elton John’s Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy album was released and certified a platinum record on the very same day. It was the first album to be certified a million seller (in this case, a two-million seller) on the first day of release.

1976 - Race jockey Steve Cauthen began an enviable win streak. Cauthen, age 16, rode his first winner at River Downs, KY. He went on to win 94 races, becoming horse racing’s most-watched jockey.

1984 - Mario Soto of the Cincinnati Reds threw four strikeouts in one inning. Soto was only pitcher number 15 since 1900 to do so. How? The hit catcher dropped the ball on the third strikeout of a game against the Chicago Cubs. The runner took off to first base and was safe. The rules state that the catcher must hold on to the ball for a third strike call to take effect. This was the first four-strikeout inning since 1978. Soto joined the company of Mike Paxton, Phil Niekro, Bill Bonham and Mike Cuellar -- all pitchers in the 1970s -- who had the same thing happen to them.

1985 - Bobby Ewing died on the season finale of Dallas on CBS-TV. “Grief gushed faster than oil,” said the critics on this five-hanky episode. Bobby, played by actor Patrick Duffy, died in a violent car explosion, but came back to life the following season (he was seen taking a shower, of all things, just as Victoria Principal, his TV wife, was about to step into the shower stall).

1987 - Eric ‘Sleepy’ Floyd of the Golden State Warriors set a playoff record for points in a single quarter. He poured in 29 points in the fourth period in a game against Pat Riley’s Los Angeles Lakers.

1998 - New York Yankees pitcher David Wells pitched a perfect game against the Minnesota Twins. The American League game had a final score of 4-0. And David Wells was a hero, having pitched only the 15th perfect game in the 118 years of major-league baseball.

Birthdays
May 17th.

1903 - James Bell
‘Cool Papa’: Baseball Hall of Famer: Negro League [1922-1950]: St. Louis Stars, Pittsburgh Crawfords, Homestead Grays, Kansas City Stars; fastest man ever to play baseball: could round the bases in 13 seconds: “...so fast he could get out of bed, turn out the lights across the room, and be back under the covers before the lights went out...”; died Mar 7, 1991

1906 - Carl McIntire
clergyman, fire and brimstone fundamentalist minister; died Mar 19, 2002

1911 - Maureen (Paul) O’Sullivan
actress: Tarzan films: Jane; Hannah and Her Sisters, Peggy Sue Got Married, The River Pirates; died June 23, 1998

1914 - Stewart Alsop
syndicated columnist [w/brother Joseph]: Matter of Fact; journalist: New York Herald Tribune, Newsweek, Washington Editor of Saturday Evening Post; writer: The Center: The Anatomy of Power in Washington, Stay of Execution : A Sort of Memoir; died May 26, 1974

1915 - Carl Liscombe
hockey: Detroit Red Wings [most points record: (7) vs. Chicago: 11/5/42]

1921 - Bob Merrill
songwriter: If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake, Doggie in the Window, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Funny Girl [w/Jules Styne]; died Feb 17, 1998

1924 - Dick Hixson
trombonist, studio musician

1932 - Jackie (John) McLean
jazz musician: alto sax; composer, playwright; educator: University of Hartford, CT

1933 - Ozzie (Osvaldo Jose Sr. Pichardo) Virgil
baseball: NY Giants, Detroit Tigers, KC Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, Pittsburgh Pirates, SF Giants

1934 - Earl Morrall
football: backup quarterback: San Francisco 49ers; Pittsburgh Steelers; Detroit Lions; NY Giants; Baltimore Colts: NFL Player of the Year [1968], Super Bowls III, V; Miami Dolphins: AFC Player of the Year [1971], Super Bowls VII, VIII

1936 - Dennis Hopper
actor: Easy Rider, Apocalypse Now, Rebel Without a Cause, Giant, Hoosiers, Flashback, Blue Velvet, Super Mario Brothers, True Romance, Speed, Waterworld, Space Truckers; director: Easy Rider, Colors, Chasers

1938 - Pervis Jackson
singer: group: The Spinners: I’ll Be Around, Could It Be I’m Falling In Love

1942 - Taj Mahal (Henry St. Claire Fredericks)
entertainer, songwriter: for film, Sounder; singer: urban folk-blues

1945 - Tony Roche
tennis champion: French Open [1966]

1948 - Carlos May
baseball: Chicago White Sox [all-star: 1969, 1972], NY Yankees [World Series: 1976], California Angels

1948 - Pat Toomay
football: Dallas Cowboys defensive end: Super Bowl V, VI

1949 - Bill Bruford
drummer: LPs: Feels Good to Me, One of a Kind, The Bruford Tapes, Gradually Going Tornado, Masterstrokes; [w/Patrick Moraz: Music for Piano and Drums, Flags; groups: Earthworks, Gong, Genesis, Yes: Owner of a Lonely Heart; UK: Danger Money, Night after Night

1955 - Bill Paxton
actor: Twister, True Lies, Aliens, Apollo 13, Future Shock, The Terminator

1956 - Sugar Ray Leonard
boxer: Olympic gold medalist: Junior Welterweight [1976]; World Welterweight [1979] and World Junior Middleweight Champion [1981], WBC Heavyweight and Super Middleweight [1988]

1956 - Bob Saget
actor: Full House; TV host: America’s Funniest Home Videos

1965 - Trent Reznor
Grammy Award-winning singer, musician: Wish [1992]; LP: Pretty Hate Machine; band: Nine Inch Nails

1970 - Jordan (Nathaniel Marcel) Knight
singer: group: New Kids on the Block [1984-1994]
Also, on this day in history. We have one of our very own WorldStart members celebrating a birthday. Happy birthday to our very own, Shanaya. Enjoy your special day, Shanaya. I hope it's a great one. ;)

Chart Toppers
May 17th.

1945 Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
Dream - The Pied Pipers
At Mail Call Today - Gene Autry

1953 I Believe - Frankie Laine
April in Portugal - The Les Baxter Orchestra
Song from Moulin Rouge - The Percy Faith Orchestra
Mexican Joe - Jim Reeves

1961 Runaway - Del Shannon
Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
A Hundred Pounds of Clay - Gene McDaniels
Hello Walls - Faron Young

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
Hair - The Cowsills
Get Back - The Beatles
My Life (Throw It Away if I Want To) - Bill Anderson

1977 When I Need You - Leo Sayer
Sir Duke - Stevie Wonder
Couldn’t Get It Right - Climax Blues Band
Some Broken Hearts Never Mend - Don Williams

1985 Don’t You Forget About Me - Simple Minds
One Night in Bangkok - Murray Head
Everything She Wants - Wham!
Somebody Should Leave - Reba McEntire


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-17-2007, 11:00 PM
138th day of 2007 - 227 remaining.

Friday, May 18, 2007
BLOW YOUR TOP DAY. :D :D

When we get angry, it is said that we “blow our tops.” This saying obviously came from the angry gods that make volcanoes blow their tops.

On this day in 1980, the 9,677-foot Mt. St. Helens, quiet for 93 years, became extremely angry and blew its top. The volcanic blast was five hundred times more powerful than the atomic bomb that leveled Hiroshima.

Steam and ash erupted more than eleven miles into the atmosphere and darkened skies in a 160-mile radius. Forest fires erupted around the volcano and burned out of control. The eruption, and those that followed, left some sixty dead and caused damage amounting to nearly three billion dollars.

Geologists said that the blast, which was felt over one hundred miles away, was probably triggered by two earthquakes. Scientists had been watching the long-dormant volcano since it first emitted some steam and ash on March 26. Eruptions occurred again on May 25 and June 12. Now that’s a long time to stay angry!

Events
May 18th.

1798 - The first Secretary of the U.S. Navy was appointed. He was Benjamin Stoddert.

1860 - Abraham Lincoln of Springfield, IL was nominated for the U.S. Presidency by Republican party leaders at a meeting in Chicago.

1912 - Since baseball great Ty Cobb had been suspended from playing the game, Hugh Jennings, manager of the Detroit Tigers, gave way to Cobb’s teammates who said they wouldn’t play unless Cobb was allowed to suit up and play, too. So, with the Tigers off the field for the day, Jennings hired the baseball team from nearby St. Joseph’s College to play in place of the Tigers! It was not, to say the least, a good day for the Tigers. St. Joseph’s pitcher, Aloysius Travers, was pounded by the Philadelphia Athletics 24-2. Travers gave up all 24 runs -- a single-game record.

1931 - Race jockey Eddie Arcaro rode his first race -- at Bainbridge, OH. He finished sixth. Later, Arcaro would become a racing legend, finishing first in over 4,100 races, including four Kentucky Derby wins. Arcaro won the Derby in 1941, 1945, 1948 and again in 1952. He rode Hill Gail, Hoop, Jr., Whirl-A-Way and Citation. Arcaro won the Triple Crown with Whirl-A-Way and Citation.

1942 - David Harding, Counterspy Counterspy was heard on the NBC Blue network for the first time. The program enjoyed a long run on radio, lasting for 15 years.

1953 - The first woman to fly faster than the speed of sound, Jacqueline Cochran, piloted an F-86 Sabrejet over California at an average speed of 652.337 miles-per-hour.

1954 - Former heavyweight boxing titleholder Max Schmeling came back to the U.S. after 15 years. He returned to referee a boxing match in Milwaukee, WI. He stayed for the beer and bratwurst, no doubt...

1957 - Jockey Eddie Arcaro rode Bold Ruler to the winner’s circle in the Preakness Stakes in Maryland.

1968 - Tiny Tim’s warbly Tiptoe through the Tulips was released. An eventual top twenty hit, Tiptoe was a remake of a number one hit for Nick Lucas in 1929. Grab your banjo and sing along. “Ohhhhh, Tiptoe through the Tuuuuulips....”

1970 - Opening this night in New York City was The Me Nobody Knows at the Orpheum Theatre. The musical had a run of 586 performances.

1974 - The Streak started a 3-week run at number one on the Billboard pop music chart. The novelty tune, by Ray Stevens, was about people running nekkid where they shouldn’t be nekkid, like, in public. It was the second number one hit for the comedian who made numerous appearances on Andy Williams’ TV show in the late 1960s, as well as his own show in the summer of 1970. His first number one hit, just prior to The Streak, was Everything is Beautiful. Both songs won gold records, as did his comedic Gitarzan, a top ten hit in 1969. “Booga-da, booga, da!”

1992 - The season finale of Murphy Brown aired on CBS with Murphy Brown, played by Candice Bergen, giving birth to an illegitimate son (Avery Brown). The following day, U.S. V.P. Dan Quayle publicly lambasted the comedy, saying that the program ‘glorified’ single-parenthood. Quayle also complained that the TV situation made a mockery of families with fathers.

Birthdays
May 18th.

1897 - Frank Capra
Academy Award-winning director: It Happened One Night [1934], Mr. Deeds Goes to Town [1936], You Can’t Take It with You [1938]; It’s a Wonderful Life, Lost Horizon, Pocketful of Miracles; died Sep 3, 1991

1902 - Meredith Willson (Reiniger)
composer: The Music Man, The Unsinkable Molly Brown; died June 15, 1984

1911 - Big Joe (Joseph Vernon) Turner
rhythm & blues singer: Corrine Corrina, Cherry Red, Still in the Dark, Chains of Love, Sweet Sixteen; died Nov 24, 1985

1912 - Perry (Pierino) Como
Grammy Award-winning singer: Catch a Falling Star [1958, his first Grammy], Round and Round, Ko Ko Mo [I Love You So], Hot Diggity, It’s Impossible, Temptation, Dream along with Me [I’m on My Way to a Star], And I Love You So, Till the End of Time, Because, Prisoner of Love, Wanted, Don’t Let the Stars Get in Your Eyes, Papa Loves Mambo; 15 gold records; Emmy Award-winning TV show: The Perry Como Show [1954, 1955, 1956, 1958-9]; TV host: The Chesterfield Supper Club, The Kraft Music Hall; Christopher Award-winner [1956]; Variety Club’s Personality of the Year [1956]; Kennedy Center Honors [1987]; films: Something for the Boys, Doll Face, If I’m Lucky, Words and Music; former barber; died May 12, 2001

1914 - Pierre Balmain
fashion designer; died June 29, 1982

1919 - Dame Margot Fonteyn
ballet dancer: Sadler Wells Company; danced with Rudolph Nureyev; died Feb 21, 1991

1920 - Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyla)
264th pope of the Roman Catholic Church: the first Polish pope; died April 2, 2005

1922 - Kai Winding
jazz musician: trombone: More [theme from Mondo Cane]; died May 6, 1983

1924 - Jack Whitaker
Broadcasters Hall of Famer: CBS Sports, ABC Sports, WCAU-TV, Philadelphia

1928 - Pernell Roberts
actor: Bonanza, Trapper John, M.D., Ride Lonesome

1931 - Robert Morse
Tony Award-winning actor: Tru [1990], How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, Secret Storm, Wild Palms, Where Were You When the Lights Went Out

1934 - Dwayne Hickman
actor: The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Cat Ballou

1937 - Brooks (Calbert) Robinson
Baseball Hall of Famer: third baseman: Baltimore Orioles [all-star: 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1964/World Series: 1966, 1969, 1970, 1971]

1946 - Reggie (Reginald Martinez) Jackson
‘Mr. October’: Baseball Hall of Famer: Kansas City Athletics, Oakland Athletics [all-star: 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975/World Series: 1973, 1974/American League MVP: 1973], Baltimore Orioles, NY Yankees [World Series: 1977, 1978, 1981/all-star: 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981], California Angels [all-star: 1982, 1983, 1984]; World Series record: 10 home runs including 4 in a row, 24 RBI’s and a .357 batting average in 27 games; 563 career home runs [only Aaron, Ruth, Mays, Frank Robinson and Killebrew have hit more]

1948 - Joe Bonsall
singer: The Oak Ridge Boys: Talk about the Good Times, Where the Soul Never Dies, Cryin’ Again, American Made, Love Song, I Guess It Never Hurts to Cry Sometimes, Everyday, Make My Life with You, Little Things, Touch a Hand Make a Friend

1949 - Dave Atkins
football: Univ. of Texas-El Paso, San Francisco 49ers, Honolulu Hawaiians [WFL], San Diego Chargers; coach: Univ. of Texas-El Paso, San Diego State, Philadelphia Eagles, New England Patriots, Arizona Cardinals, New Orleans Saints, Minnesota Vikings

1949 - Rick Wakeman
songwriter, musician: keyboards: groups: The Strawbs; Yes: Roundabout; solo LPs: Journey to the Center of the Earth, The Myths and Legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table; composer: films scores: The Phantom of the Opera [1990], Playing for Keeps, Creepshow 2, Bullet to Beijing, Midnight in St. Petersburg

1950 - Rodney Milburn Jr.
Olympic Gold Medalist: 110-meter hurdles [1972]: set a world record of 13.1 seconds [1973]; died in Nov 1997 after falling into a tank of scalding bleach at his workplace

1951 - James Stephens
actor: The Paper Chase, Father Dowling Mysteries, Pancho Barnes, Mysterious Two, First Monday in October.

Chart Toppers
May 18th.

1946 All Through the Day - Perry Como
The Gypsy - The Ink Spots
Shoo Fly Pie - The Stan Kenton Orchestra (vocal: June Christy)
New Spanish Two Step - Bob Wills

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Little Things Mean a Lot - Kitty Kallen
If You Love Me (Really Love Me) - Kay Starr
I Really Don’t Want to Know - Eddy Arnold

1962 Soldier Boy - The Shirelles
Stranger on the Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk
She Cried - Jay & The Americans
She Thinks I Still Care - George Jones

1970 American Woman/No Sugar Tonight - The Guess Who
Vehicle - The Ides of March
Cecilia - Simon & Garfunkel
My Love - Sonny James

1978 If I Can’t Have You - Yvonne Elliman
The Closer I Get to You - Roberta Flack with Donny Hathaway
With a Little Luck - Wings
It’s All Wrong, But It’s All Right - Dolly Parton

1986 Greatest Love of All - Whitney Houston
Why Can’t This Be Love - Van Halen
What Have You Done for Me Lateley - Janet Jackson
Ain’t Misbehavin’ - Hank Williams, Jr.


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-18-2007, 11:00 PM
139th day of 2007 - 226 remaining.

Saturday, May 19, 2007
RIB-IT DAY. :D :D

The Pride of San Joaquin Valley was declared the winner of the first frog-jumping jubilee held in Calaveras County, CA on this day in 1928. The froggy jumped three feet, four inches, higher than 49 other frogs entered in the contest. The true beginnings of the frog jubilee date back to gold rush days, an event instigated by none other than Mark Twain.

The frogs are still hoppin’ each May at the Calaveras County Fair & Jumping Frog Jubilee. Frogs come from all over the world to compete in this, the road to top frog. Incidentally, frogs jump a lot more than three feet today, and for a fair amount of money, prizes and media exposure. The current record is held by Rosie the Ribiter from Santa Clara, CA. Rosie made the record-setting 21 feet, 5 3/4 inch jump in May of 1986.

Four legs, two eyes, in the water, ker-plunk! Rib-it! :D

Events
May 19th.


1847 - The first English-style railroad coach was placed in service on the Fall River Line in Massachusetts.

1857 - William F. Channing and Moses G. Farmer patented the electric fire alarm system in Boston, MA: the first city to adopt the system.

1911 - The first person to commit a crime and be convicted through the use of fingerprints turned out to be Caesar Cella. He had been ‘thumbed’ in New York City.

1912 - The Associated Advertising Clubs of America held its first convention -- in Dallas, TX. The organization is a truth and fair practices group.

1921 - The first opera presented in its entirety over the radio was broadcast by 9ZAF in Denver, CO. The opera, "Martha", aired from the Denver Auditorium.

1926 - Thomas Edison spoke at a dinner for the National Electric Light Association in Atlantic City, NJ. When asked to speak into the microphone, he said, “I don’t know what to say. This is the first time I ever spoke into one of these things ... Good night.”

1941 - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra backed the popular singing duo of Bob Eberly and Helen O’Connell as Decca record number 3859 turned out to be Time Was -- a classic.

1952 - Yoshio Shirai defeated flyweight champion Dado Marino in Tokyo to become Japan’s first world-boxing champ.

1958 - Bobby Darin’s single, Splish Splash, was released as the first eight-track master recording pressed to a plastic 45 RPM disc.

1965 - Roger Miller received a gold record for the hit, King of the Road. The song was Miller’s biggest hit record. It got to number four (3/20/65) on the pop charts and stayed on for 12 weeks. It was a number one country music hit (3/27/65) as well. Miller, a country singer, humorist, guitarist and composer from Fort Worth, TX and raised in Oklahoma, went to Nashville, TN in the mid-1950s to begin a songwriting career. He wrote songs and played drums for Faron Young in 1962, then won what was an unprecedented six Grammy Awards in 1965, had his own TV show in 1966; wrote Little Green Apples, a huge hit for O.C. Smith and had five tunes in the top ten in 1968. To top it off, he composed the music for the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, Big River in 1985. (Miller died Oct 25, 1992 of throat cancer.)

1966 - Country music came to New York’s Carnegie Hall this night. Eddy Arnold debuted with an array of popular country artists in the Big Apple.

1968 - Piano stylist and vocalist Bobby Short gained national attention as he presented a concert with Mabel Mercer at New York’s Town Hall. He had been the featured artist at the intimate Hotel Carlisle for years.

1973 - Secretariat won the second jewel of horse racing’s Triple Crown by capturing the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore, MD. The famed horse later went on to win the Belmont Stakes in New York to earn the Triple Crown with jockey Ron Turcotte as the rider.

1973 - Stevie Wonder moved to the number one position on the Billboard pop music chart with You are the Sunshine of My Life. It was the third number one song for Wonder, following earlier successes with Fingertips - Pt 2 (8/10/63) and Superstition (1/27/73). He would have seven more number one hits between 1973 and 1987: You Haven’t Done Nothin’, I Wish, Sir Duke, Ebony & Ivory (with Paul McCartney), I Just Called to Say I Love You, Part-Time Lover and That’s What Friends are For.

1984 - The Edmonton Oilers defeated the New York Islanders by a 5-2 score to win the Stanley Cup. The win by the Oilers ended the Islanders’ domination of the National Hockey League the previous four seasons.

Birthdays
May 19th.


1800 - Sarah Peale
portrait artist; died Feb 4, 1885

1890 - Ho Chi Mihn (Nguyen That Thanh)
North Vietnamese leader: trail and city named after him; died Sep 2, 1969

1901 - Dorothy Buffum Chandler
Los Angeles cultural patron; widow of LA Times publisher Norman Chandler; mother of publisher Otis Chandler; Dorothy Chandler Pavillion named for her; died July 6, 1997

1906 - Bruce Bennett (Herman Brix)
actor: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Dark Passage, Angels in the Outfield

1919 - Georgie Auld (John Altwerger)
musician: saxophones: bandleader; actor: The Rat Race, dubbed soundtrack for Robert DeNero in New York, New York; died Jan 8, 1990

1925 - Malcolm X (Malcolm Little)
black nationalist and civil rights activist; assassinated Feb 21, 1965

1928 - Gil (Gilbert James) McDougald
baseball: NY Yankees [AL Rookie of the Year: 1951/World Series: 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960/all-star: 1952, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959

1928 - Dolph Schayes
Basketball Hall of Famer: Syracuse Nationals, Philadelphia Warriors; coach: Philadelphia ’76ers, Buffalo Braves, NBA Coach of the Year [1966]; NBA’s Silver Anniversary Team [1971]

1929 - Curt (Curtis Thomas) Simmons
baseball: pitcher: Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1952, 1953, 1957], SL Cardinals [World Series: 1964], Chicago Cubs, California Angels

1930 - Lorraine Hansberry
playwright: A Raisin in the Sun, To be Young, Gifted and Black; died Jan 12, 1965

1931 - Stephen Young (Levy)
actor: Judd for the Defense, Patton, Scorned, Who’s Harry Crumb?, Deadline, Lifeguard, When Husbands Cheat, Strange Justice

1934 - James Lehrer
PBS: journalist: anchor: The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer; co-anchor: The MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour; novelist: Blue Hearts

1935 - David Hartman
Emmy Award-winning TV host: Good Morning America; actor: Hello Dolly, Lucas Tanner, The Bold Ones

1939 - James Fox
actor: Patriot Games, The Russia House, A Passage to India

1939 - Nancy Kwan
actress: The World of Suzie Wong, Flower Drum Song, Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story

1939 - Francis R. (Dick) Scobee
Commander of the ill-fated U.S. space shuttle, Challenger; killed in Challenger explosion Jan 28, 1986

1941 - Nora Ephron
author: Heartburn, Sleepless in Seattle

1945 - Peter Townshend
musician: group: The Who [Rock and Roll Hall of Famers (1990)]: My Generation, Happy Jack, I Can See for Miles, Magic Bus, Won’t Get Fooled Again; composed rock-opera: Tommy, See Me, Feel Me, Pinball Wizard; solo: Rough Boys, Let My Love Open the Door, Uniforms, Exquisitely Bored, The Sea Refuses No River

1949 - Dusty Hill
musician: bass, singer: group: ZZ Top: Jesus Just Left Chicago, LA Grange, Tush, Gimme All Your Lovin’, Legs, Sharp Dressed Man, Sleeping Bag

1949 - Archie Manning
football [quarterback]: Univ of Mississippi; NFL: New Orleans Saints [NFC Player of the Year [1978]; Houston Oilers; Minnesota Vikings

1951 - Joey Ramone (Jeffrey Hyman)
singer: group: The Ramones: Beat on the Brat, Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue, Do You Remember Rock ’n’ Roll Radio, Baby I Love You, We Want the Airwaves, The KKK Took My Baby, Howling at the Moon; died Apr 15, 2001

1952 - Grace Jones (Mendoza)
singer: Slave to the Rhythm; actress: A View to a Kill, Conan the Destroyer, Deadly Vengeance

1952 - Mike Nott
football: BC Lions [CFL]

1954 - Rick (Richard Aldo) Cerone
baseball: Cleveland Indians, Toronto Blue Jays, NY Yankees [World Series: 1981], Atlanta Braves, Milwaukee Brewers, Boston Red Sox, NY Mets, Montreal Expos

1954 - Phil Rudd
musician: drums: group: AC/DC: LPs: Let There Be Rock, Powerage, Highway to Hell, Dirty Deeds Done Cheap, For Those About to Rock

1956 - Steven (Meigs) Ford
actor: When Harry Met Sally, Body Count, Eraser, Contact, Armageddon; son of former U.S. President Gerald R. and Betty Ford

1956 - Martyn Ware
musician: synthesizer: groups: The Human League: LP: Reproduction; Heaven 17: We Don’t Need This Fascist Groove Thang, Temptation, Crushed by the Wheels of Industry.

Chart Toppers
May 19th.

1947 Mam’selle - Art Lund
Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
My Adobe Hacienda - Eddy Howard
New Jolie Blonde (New Pretty Blonde) - Red Foley

1955 Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
A Blossom Fell - Nat King Cole
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 If You Wanna Be Happy - Jimmy Soul
Surfin’ USA - The Beach Boys
Foolish Little Girl - The Shirelles
Lonesome 7-7203 - Hawkshaw Hawkins

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5
Brown Sugar - The Rolling Stones
I Won’t Mention It Again - Ray Price

1979 Reunited - Peaches & Herb
Hot Stuff - Donna Summer
In the Navy - Village People
If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body Would You Hold It Against Me -
Bellamy Brothers

1987 With or Without You - U2
The Lady in Red - Chris DeBurgh
Heat of the Night - Bryan Adams
To Know Him is to Love Him - Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou
Harris


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-19-2007, 11:00 PM
140th day of 2007 - 225 remaining.

Sunday, May 20, 2007
SLICE OF LIFE DAY. :)

The most famous magazine illustrator of the twentieth century drew it like it was. This was the day, in 1916, when Norman Rockwell’s first cover on The Saturday Evening Post appeared. The illustration was of a young boy having to care for his baby sibling while his little buddies left him and went off to play ball. The forlorn child pushing a baby carriage tugged at the heart strings of all who saw it.

Norman Rockwell drew over 300 covers for The Saturday Evening Post plus covers for Collier’s, American Boy, The Literary Digest, LIFE and others. He also painted the Boy Scouts of America calendar pictorials for 45 years. Four of his famous paintings are The Four Freedoms, used as patriotic posters during WWII.

All of his illustrations, including those used in advertising campaigns pictured nostalgic scenes of small-town America (many of Rockwell’s models were his New England neighbors) ... true slices of life captured from a time gone by.

Those were the days...

Events
May 20th.

1830 - The first timetables of the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad were published in the Baltimore American newspaper. All aboard!

1830 - H.D. Hyde of Reading, Pennsylvania patented the fountain pen. And a messy contraption it was.

1875 - The International Bureau of Weights and Measures was established.

1899 - Jacob German of New York City became the first driver to be arrested for speeding. Mr. German was whipping his taxicab all over Lexington Avenue and being a pain in the neck by going over the posted 12 mile-per-hour speed limit!

1927 - ‘Lucky’ Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field in New York aboard the small airplane Spirit of St. Louis, en route to Paris, France. Thirty-three and one-half hours later, Charles A. Lindbergh arrived at his destination -- and flew into history.

1933 - Charlie Chan was heard for the final time on the NBC Blue radio network after only six months on the air. Not to worry. Several revivals of the Chinese detective were on the air years later ... and in the movies and seen on TV.

1939 - The first telecast over telephone wires was sent from Madison Square Garden to the NBC-TV studios at 30 Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan. A bicycle race was the event broadcast to a breathless audience.

1939 - The Yankee Clipper took off from Port Washington, NY, bound for Europe. The plane, the flagship of Pan American Airways, established the first regular air-passenger service across the Atlantic Ocean.

1941 - Harry James and his orchestra recorded the classic You Made Me Love You for Columbia Records.

1973 - Ken Moore beat 4,030 competitors to win the 63rd Bay-to-Breakers footrace in San Francisco, CA. Moore stepped his way to the finish line in 37 minutes, 15 seconds over a course measured at 7.8 miles.

1978 - Mavis Hutchinson, 53, made it to New York City to become the first woman to run across America. The 3,000-mile trek took her 69 days. She ran an average of 45 miles each day. Now that’s what we call a daily workout.

1982 - TV’s Barney Miller was seen for the last time in its original network run on ABC-TV. Hal Linden as Barney, Abe Vigoda as Fish and a talented cast continue to bring the fictional 12th Precinct to TV screens through syndication.

1985 - The Dow Jones industrial average broke the 1300 mark for the first time. The Dow gained 19.54 points to close at 1304.88.

1985 - Larry Holmes retained the heavyweight boxing title of the International Boxing Federation at Reno, NV by defeating Carl Wilson in 15 rounds. The fight marked the first, heavyweight title fight in Reno since Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries duked it out in 1910.

1987 - The Milwaukee Brewers ended a 12-game losing streak by beating the Chicago White Sox by a 5-1 score. The Brew Crew had opened the season winning 13 games in a row.

Birthdays
May 20th.


1768 - Dolley Madison (Payne)
U.S. First Lady, wife of 4th U.S. President James Madison; died July 12, 1849

1799 - Honore de Balzac
novelist: The Human Comedy, Droll Stories, The Chouans; died Aug 18,1850

1806 - John Stuart Mill
leader of the utilitarian movement: editor: Westminster Review; philosopher: System of Logic, Principles of Political Economy, Utilitarianism, On Liberty, The Subjection of Women; died May 8, 1873

1908 - (Jimmy) James (Maitland) Stewart
Academy Award-winning actor: Philadelphia Story [1940]; The Glenn Miller Story, It’s a Wonderful Life, Harvey, Rear Window, Anatomy of a Murder, Bell, Book and Candle, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Vertigo, The Man from Laramie; died July 2, 1997

1916 - Patricia Ellis (Leftwich)
actress: Three on a Match, Back Door to Heaven, The Case of the Lucky Legs, Postal Inspector; died Mar 26, 1970

1919 - ‘Lonesome’ George Gobel
Emmy Award winning personality [1954], comedian: “Well I’ll be a dirty bird.”: The George Gobel Show, The Eddie Fisher Show, Hollywood Squares; actor: Better Late than Never, The Fantastic World of D.C. Collins, Harper Valley P.T.A.; died Feb 24, 1991

1920 - Vic Ames (Urick)
singer: group: The Ames Brothers: You, You, You are the One, Rag Mop, Sentimental Me, Undecided, You, You, You, The Man with the Banjo, The Naughty Lady of Shady Lane, Tammy, Melodie d’Amour; killed in car crash Jan 23, 1978

1923 - Edith Fellows
actress: The Grace Kelly Story, In the Mood

1926 - Bob Sweikert
auto racer: Indianapolis 500 winner [1955]; killed in race at Salem IN June 17, 1956

1927 - Bud (Henry) Grant
Pro Football Hall of Famer: Philadelphia Eagles; player & coach: Winnipeg Blue Bombers; Minnesota Vikings coach; basketball: Minneapolis Lakers: forward

1927 - David Hedison (Ara David Heditsian)
actor: Licence to Kill, Live and Let Die

1930 - James McEachin
actor: The Dead Don’t Die, Double Exposure

1931 - Ken (Kenton Lloyd) Boyer
baseball: St. Louis Cardinals [all-star: 1956, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964/World Series: 1964/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1964]; NY Mets, Chicago White Sox, LA Dodgers; died Sep 7, 1982

1933 - Constance Towers
actress: Naked Kiss, On Wings of Eagles

1936 - Anthony Zerbe
Emmy Award-winning actor: Harry-O [1975-76]; The Young Riders, North and South, Book II, Centennial; Licence to Kill, Onassis, Opposing Force, Dead Zone, Rooster Cogburn, The Parallax View, Papillon, Omega Man, They Call Me Mr. Tibbs, Cool Hand Luke, Harry-O

1937 - Dave Hill
golf: SPGA tour: champ: 1987 Fairfield Barnett Senior Classic [1987], MONY Senior Tournament of Champions [1987], MONY Syracuse Senior Classic [1987], Paine Webber Invitational [1987]; “The golf swing is like sex. You can’t be thinking about the mechanics of the act while you are performing.”

1937 - Teddy Randazzo
songwriter/producer: Goin’ Out of My Head, Hurt So Bad, I’m on the Outside [Looking In]; singer: Way of a Clown; actor: Rock, Rock, Rock, Mister Rock and Roll, Hey, Let’s Twist; died Nov 21, 2003

1940 - Stan Mikita
hockey: NHL: Chicago Blackhawks: Hart Memorial Trophy Winner [1967, 1968]

1944 - Joe (John Robert) ****er
singer, songwriter: With a Little Help from My Friends, She Came in through the Bathroom Window, The Letter, Up Where We Belong [w/Jennifer Warnes], You are So Beautiful, When the Night Comes, Cry Me a River

1946 - Cher (Cherilyn Sarkisian LaPierre)
singer: group: Sonny & Cher: I Got You Babe, The Beat Goes On, All I Really Want to Do; solo: Bang Bang, Gypsys, Tramps and Thieves, The Way of Love, Dark Lady; Academy Award-winning actress: Moonstruck [1987]; The Witches of Eastwick, Silkwood, Mask

1946 - Bobby (Ray) Murcer
baseball: NY Yankees [all-star: 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974/World Series: 1981], SF Giants [all-star: 1975], Chicago Cubs

1951 - Cullen Bryant
football: Los Angeles Rams: running back: Super Bowl XIV

1952 - Warren Cann
musician: drums: group: Ultravox: Vienna, All Stood Still, The Thin Wall, The Voice, Reap the Wild Wind, Hymn, Visions in Blue

1958 - Ronald Prescott Reagan
dancer; talk show host; son of former U.S. President Ronald Reagan

1959 - Bronson Pinchot
actor: Courage Under Fire, Beverly Hills Cop series, The Flamingo Kid, Risky Business, Perfect Strangers, Sara, Stephen King’s The Langoliers

1960 - Susan Cowsill
singer: At the End of the Day, groups: Continental Drifters, Psycho Sisters, The Cowsills: We Can Fly, Ask the Children, Heather Says, Yellow Pills, Vol I

1960 - Tony Goldwyn
actor: The Boys Next Door, Truman, Pocahontas: The Legend, Nixon, The Pelican Brief, Ghost, Gaby: A True Story

1961 - Nick Heyward
musician: guitar, singer, songwriter: Favourite Shirts [Boy Meets Girl], Love Plus One, Fantastic Day, The Day It Rained Forever, Whistle Down the Wind, Take That Situation; group: Haircut 100

1963 - Brian ‘Nasher’ Nash
musician: guitar: group: Frankie Goes to Hollywood: Relax!, Two Tribes, The Power of Love, Welcome to the Pleasure Dome.

Chart Toppers
May 20th.

1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
Baby Face - The Art Mooney Orchestra
The Dickey Bird Song - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn
Hughes)
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Wayward Wind - Gogi Grant
I’m in Love Again - Fats Domino
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 My Guy - Mary Wells
Love Me Do - The Beatles
Ronnie - The 4 Seasons
My Heart Skips a Beat - Buck Owens

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
Oh Girl - Chi-Lites
I’ll Take You There - The Staple Singers
Grandma Harp - Merle Haggard

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
Lost in Love - Air Supply
Gone Too Far - Eddie Rabbitt

1988 Anything for You - Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine
Shattered Dreams - Johnny Hates Jazz
One More Try - George Michael
I’m Gonna Get You - Eddy Raven


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.
[B]
All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-20-2007, 11:00 PM
141st day of 2007 - 224 remaining.

Monday, May 21, 2007
MAYBELLENE DAY. ;)

No, this day has nothing to do with face make-up -- but it does have to do with the make-up of the pop music charts of mid-1950s. With the dawn of rock and roll upon us, Chuck Berry started his climb to stardom.

Berry, born in San Jose, California but raised in St. Louis, Missouri, was introduced to record executive Leonard Chess (of Chess Records in Chicago) by bluesman Muddy Waters. Berry, who had learned to play the guitar in St. Louis, and had led a trio there, played his demo tape for Chess. One of the songs on the tape was a country song performed in rhythm and blues style. It was titled, Ida Red.

On this day in 1955, Berry went into a recording session for Chess, performing a restyled version of Ida Red. What came out of that hot session was Ida Red’s new name and Chuck Berry’s first hit, Maybellene. Maybellene topped the R & B charts at #1, and the pop charts at #5.

And Beethoven rolled over...

Events
May 21st.


1819 - The first bicycles in the United States were called swift walkers and were seen for the first time on the streets of New York City on this day.

1881 - The United States National Lawn Tennis Association was formed in New York City.

1891 - From the You Won’t Believe Your Eyes department: Peter Jackson and Jim Corbett fought to a draw in San Francisco, CA. Nothing wrong with that except the boxing match went an unprecedented 61 rounds! No wonder it was a draw. The boxers couldn’t raise their arms anymore! What did they do, holler at each other? And was there a dinner break? How about other necessities of nature? Was the crowd enthusiastic the entire time? How many times did the fighters just stand around and stare at each other for an entire round? Inquiring sports minds want to know!

1906 - Louis H. Perlman of New York City received his patent for the demountable tire-carrying rim -- similar to the ones we use on our cars, only wider.

1922 - The cartoon, On the Road to Moscow, by Rollin Kirby, won a Pulitzer Prize. It was the first cartoon awarded the Pulitzer.

1927 - Charles A. Lindbergh arrived to a hero’s welcome in Paris, in his spindly monoplane, The Spirit of St. Louis (the famous plane is now displayed in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC). Lindbergh’s flight marked the first time that a person had flown across the Atlantic Ocean. The event got more press coverage than any other single even in history to that time. In American newspapers alone, it was estimated that some 27,000 columns of words were used to describe Lindbergh’s epic journey. A depiction of that famous flight was portrayed by one of America’s great motion picture actors, Jimmy Stewart, in the film, The Spirit of St. Louis. Upon his return to American soil, Lucky Lindy was given another hero’s welcome.

1929 - The first automatic electric stock quotation board was put into operation by Sutro and Company of New York City.

1934 - The first city in the United States to fingerprint each of its citizens was:
a) New York
b) Miami
c) Oskaloosa
d) Bakersfield
If you said Oskaloosa and, better yet, added that the city is located in the corn fields of Iowa; you should get a free fingerprinting for knowing the correct answer.

1940 - Will Bradley and his orchestra recorded one of the best of the Big Band era. Ray McKinley played drums and did the vocal for the boogie-woogie tune, Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar. The song, on Columbia Records, was so long it took up both sides of the 78 rpm platter.

1945 - Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart were married. Legend has it that the couple fell in love in 1943 during making of the film, To Have and Have Not. Theirs would become one of Hollywood’s most enduring marriages.

1947 - Joe DiMaggio and five of his New York Yankees teammates were slapped with $100 fines. Why? They had not fulfilled contract requirements to do promotional duties for the team.

1959 - Gypsy, a musical based on the life of stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, opened on Broadway. Ethel Merman played Gypsy’s mother, Rose, who pushed her two daughters into burlesque. With music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Gypsy closed on March 25, 1961 after 702 performances.

1973 - The sensual Pillow Talk, by Sylvia (Sylvia Vanderpool), earned a gold record. The artist first recorded with Hot Lips Page for Columbia Records back in 1950 and was known as Little Sylvia. She was half of the singing duo Mickey & Sylvia, who recorded Love is Strange in 1957. Pillow Talk was her only major solo hit and made it to number three on the pop music charts.

1985 - Marvin Gaye’s last album was released. Dream of a Lifetime featured songs that critics considered too offensive, such as the controversial, pop version of The Lord’s Prayer. Three of the songs from the album were completed after Gaye’s death. Marvin Gaye was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987.

1991 - The prime minister of India from 1984 until 1989, Rajiv Gandhi was in the midst of a campaign rally for reelection when a bomb exploded in his hand. Like his mother, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi was assassinated. The bomb was hidden in a bouquet of flowers handed to Rajiv by a so-called admirer.

Birthdays
May 21 st.

1471 - Albrecht Durer
artist: Martyrdom of the Ten Thousand, Adoration of the Magi, Young Hare; engraver: Knight, Death and the Devil, The Smaller Passion; died Apr 6, 1528

1688 - Alexander Pope
poet: the Pastorals, An Essay on Criticism, The Rape of the Lock, The Art of Sinking in Poetry, The Dunciad, An Essay on Man; died May 30, 1744

1844 - Henri Rousseau
artist: The Sleeping Gypsy; died Sep 2, 1910

1898 - Armand Hammer
industrialist: Occidental Petroleum Co.; physician: donated millions to aid cancer research; died Dec 10, 1990

1901 - Horace Heidt
bandleader: Horace Heidt and His Musical Knights; radio show host: Pot O’ Gold; talent show host: Youth Opportunity; died Dec 1, 1986

1904 - Robert Montgomery (Henry Montgomery Jr.)
actor: Private Lives, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Here Comes Mr. Jordan; director: Eye Witness, Lady in the Lake, The Gallant Hours; host: Robert Montgomery Presents; father of actress, Elizabeth Montgomery; died Sep 27, 1981

1904 - Fats (Thomas Wright) Waller
blues musician: piano, organ, song writer: Ain’t Misbehavin’, Honeysuckle Rose; led sextet: It’s a Sin to Tell a Lie, Smarty, All My Life, Two Sleepy People; actor: King of Burlesque, Hooray for Love, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Stormy Weather; died Dec 15, 1943

1909 - Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel
kindergarten art teacher: her work was inspiration for the famous Hummel figurines; died Nov 6, 1946

1916 - Harold Robbins (Francis Kane)
writer: The Carpetbaggers, The Piranhas, Stiletto, The Dream Merchants, The Betsy; died Oct 14, 1997

1917 - Raymond (William Stacy) Burr
actor: Perry Mason, Ironside, Rear Window, A Place in the Sun, The Defense Never Rests, Godzilla; died Sep 12, 1993

1918 - Dennis Day (Eugene Denis McNulty)
singer: Mam’selle, Danny Boy, Clancy Lowered the Boom; actor: The Jack Benny Show, The RCA Victor Show, The Dennis Day Show, The Powers Girl, I’ll Get By, Golden Girl; died June 22, 1988

1920 - Anthony (Maitland) Steel
actor: Wooden Horse, Malta Story, Perfect Crime; married to actress Anita Ekberg; died Mar 21, 2001

1921 - Andrei Sakharov
physicist: produced first Soviet atomic bomb, also hydrogen bomb; human rights activist: formulated concepts of perestroika and glasnost; died Dec 14, 1989

1923 - Ara Parseghian
College Football Hall of Famer: head coach: Notre Dame, Northwestern, Miami; TV sports commentator; chairman of Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation

1924 - Peggy (Mary Margaret) Cass
comedienne: To Tell the Truth; actress: The Hathaways, Women in Prison, Aunty Mame, Paddy, Gidget Goes Hawaiian, Cheaters; radio serial: The Doctors; died Mar 8, 1999

1924 - Ed (Edward Raymond) Fitz Gerald
baseball: catcher: Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Nationals, Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians

1926 - Robert Creeley
author: Have a Heart; poet: Windows

1930 - Tommy Bryant
jazz/studio musician: bassist: played w/Dizzy Gillespie, Jo Jones, Sonny Rollins, Benny Golson;

1939 - Heinz Holliger
musician: oboe virtuoso, composer, conductor: Siebensgesang for oboe voices and orchestra

1941 - David Groh
actor: General Hospital, Rhoda, Hot Shot, Broken Vows, Illegal in Blue

1941 - Ronald Isley
singer: group: The Isley Brothers: Shout, Twist and Shout, This Old Heart of Mine [Is Weak for You], It’s Your Thing, That Lady, Fight the Power

1944 - Marcie Blane
singer: Bobby’s Girl

1944 - Janet Dailey
novelist: The Glory Game, Silver Wings, Santiago Blue, The Pride of Hanna Wade, Calder Saga, Notorious, The Rogue, Rivals, Tangled Vines, The Keeper

1945 - Richard Hatch
actor: Battlestar Galactica, Ghetto Blaster, Party Line, Delta Force, Commando 2; radio host: Love on the Edge

1948 - Carol Potter
actress; Beverly Hills 90210, Today’s F.B.I.

1948 - Leo Sayer (Gerard Hugh Sayer)
singer: Long Tall Glasses, You Make Me Feel like Dancing, When I Need You, More Than I Can Say

1952 - Mr. T (Lawrence Tureaud)
actor: The A-Team, Rocky III, The Magic of the Golden Bear: Goldy 3, Spy Hard, Inspector Gadget

1955 - Stan Lynch
musician: drums: group: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers: American Girl, Don’t Do Me like That, Don’t Come Around Here No More, Jammin’ Me

1957 - Judge Reinhold (Edward Ernest Reinhold Jr.)
actor: The Wharf Rat, The Right to Remain Silent, Beverly Hills Cop series, Baby on Board, Ruthless People, Gremlins, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Stripes

1960 - Kent (Alan) Hrbek
baseball: Minnesota Twins [all-star: 1982/World Series: 1987, 1991]

1972 - The Notorious B.I.G. (Christopher Wallace)
rapper: LPs: Ready to Die, Life After Death, Born Again; shot and killed in Los Angeles Mar 9, 1997 [his killer has not been identified]

Chart Toppers
May 21st.

1949 Riders in the Sky - Vaughn Monroe
Again - Gordon Jenkins
Forever and Ever - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The Skylarks)
Lovesick Blues - Hank Williams

1957 All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
School Day - Chuck Berry
Love Letters in the Sand - Pat Boone
A White Sport Coat (And a Pink Carnation) - Marty Robbins

1965 Ticket to Ride - The Beatles
Help Me, Rhonda - The Beach Boys
Back in My Arms Again - The Supremes
Girl on the Billboard - Del Reeves

1973 You are the Sunshine of My Life - Stevie Wonder
Little Willy - The Sweet
Frankenstein - The Edgar Winter Group
What’s Your Mama’s Name - Tanya Tucker

1981 Bette Davis Eyes - Kim Carnes
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Being with You - Smokey Robinson
I Loved ’Em Every One - T.G. Sheppard

1989 Forever Your Girl - Paula Abdul
Real Love - Jody Watley
Soldier of Love - Donny Osmond
If I Had You - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

[B]All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-21-2007, 11:00 PM
142nd day of 2007 - 223 remaining.

Tuesday, May 22, 2007
DOYLE DAY. :)

He was a doctor without any patients. That’s how Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, born on this day in 1859 at Edinburgh Scotland, began to write. You see, while he was waiting for patients, of which there were hardly any, he was so bored that he started writing short stories. The stories earned him some, but not much money; then Dr. Doyle wrote his first novel centering around the character who became the world’s best-known detective, Sherlock Holmes.

It was 1887 and the novel was titled, A Study in Scarlet. Arthur Conan Doyle (he wasn’t a Sir, yet) was on his way to success. In fact, he eventually became one of the highest-paid short-story writers of the times.

Doyle’s tales of Sherlock Holmes solving crimes with his amazing ability to use reason and observation have delighted millions of readers for over one hundred years. Holmes appeared in 56 short stories and three more novels, The Sign of Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Valley of Fear.

Critic Christopher Morley once said, “Perhaps no fiction character ever created has become so charmingly real to his readers (as Sherlock Holmes).”

Put that in your meerschaum and smoke it!

Events
May 22nd.


1761 - The first life insurance policy issued in the United States was issued on this day. Can you think which company it was? Nope. Don’t even try. You’ll never guess. It was the Corporation for the Relief of Poor and Distressed Presbyterian Ministers and of the Poor and Distressed Widows and Children of Presbyterian Ministers. WOW-Zers! Can you image what size their letterhead must have been? It was the CftRoPaDPMaoftPaDWaCoPM ... for short. We wonder how long the policy must have been...

1819 - The steamship Savannah was the first to cross the Atlantic. It sailed from Savannah, Georgia to Liverpool, England. This day is now celebrated in the United States as National Maritime Day.

1841 - Henry Kennedy of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was lounging around the house when the mailman rang his doorbell (or cranked it, since electricity wasn’t even available, yet ... or, heck, maybe he just knocked on the door. There were doors back then, you know...) In any case, a patent had arrived for Mr. Kennedy for the first reclining chair. So, sit back (er, recline), relax, and enjoy the rest of today’s show...

1849 - Abraham Lincoln received patent number 6469 for his floating dry dock.

1868 - The masked Reno Gang pulled off the great train robbery at Marshfield, IN. They hauled in $98,000 in loot.

1900 - A. DeVilbiss, Jr. of Toledo, OH patented his pendulum-type computing scale. Many are still around. Check out your nearest produce stand at the market.

1900 - Edwin S. Votey of Detroit, MI patented his pianola: a pneumatic piano player. The device could be attached to any piano. Batteries not included.

1931 - From the Mmmm, Good! file: The Floridian Products Corporation of Arcadia offered its product for sale. Was it orange juice, rattlesnake meat, sectioned grapefruit or alligator purses? If you said rattlesnake meat, you were looking a line ahead and were cheating, but that is the correct answer!

1950 - Scotland’s James Wilson defeated Bing Crosby in the opening round of the British Amateur golf championship played at St. Andrew’s Scotland.

1955 - Jack Benny signed off his last live network radio broadcast after a run of 23 years. Mr. Benny was devoting his time fully to TV. His program brought many of his old cronies to TV as well: announcer Don Wilson; bandleader Phil Harris; Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson; singer Dennis Day; and Benny’s wife, Mary Livingstone.

1961 - Ernie K-Doe, aka Ernest Kador Jr., joined the growing list of one hit wonders (recording artists who had only one hit song). Mother-In-Law was Ernie’s one hit, and a number one tune on U.S. pop music charts.

1965 - The Beatles got their eighth consecutive number one hit as Ticket to Ride rode to the top of the singles list. The song topped the charts for one week.

1966 - Bruce Springsteen recorded his very first song, along with his band, The Castilles. It was titled, That’s What You Get. The song was never released. Bruce was just practicing. He was just sixteen...

1967 - What was to become the Public Broadcasting System’s longest-running children’s program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, debuted on this day.

1967 - The final To Tell the Truth program was seen on CBS-TV. It had been on the air for over 10 years. The show began syndication sometime later, in a slightly different format.

1970 - The Guess Who from the Winnipeg, Canada area earned a gold record for both the album and single, American Woman. It would be one of three million-seller awards for the group. Their other hits included, These Eyes, Laughing and No Sugar Tonight. The group, which dates back to 1963, disbanded in 1975, with several reunions since then. From the Additional Information You Probably Didn’t Need To Know department: Randy Bachman played lead guitar before leaving the group in August, 1970 to form Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Burton Cummings was lead singer starting in 1966.

1972 - The first U.S. president to visit Moscow did so on this day. President Richard Nixon met with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev.

1985 - GTE Corporation (General Telephone and Electronics) was named by Fortune magazine as the largest utility in the U.S. In the same issue of Fortune, Sears was named as the nation’s largest retailer for the 21st year in a row.

1986 - Sylvester Stallone agreed to a 10-picture, six-year deal with United Artists. He signed for a reported $15 million for each film . The deal made him the richest actor in Hollywood.

1992 - Johnny Carson hosted The Tonight Show for the last time. It was the end of three decades of late nights spent with Carson and his sidekick, Ed McMahon and bandleader, Doc Severinsen. Comedian Jay Leno replaced Carson.

Birthdays
May 22 nd.

1813 - Wilhelm Richard Wagner
composer: Tristan, Isolde, Lohengrin; died Feb 13, 1883

1844 - Mary Cassatt
artist: The Bath; died June 14, 1926

1859 - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
physician; writer; died July 7, 1930; see Doyle Day [above]

1907 - Sir Laurence (Kerr) Olivier
Academy Award-winning actor: Hamlet [1948]; War Requiem, The Boys from Brazil, Brideshead Revisited, Carrie, The Jazz Singer, Peter the Great, Richard III, Spartacus, The Merchant of Venice, Marathon Man, Khartoum; Emmy Award-winning actor: The Moon and Sixpence [1960], A Long Day’s Journey into Night [1973], Love Among the Ruins [1975], Brideshead Revisited, King Lear [1984]; died July 11, 1989

1914 - Vance Packard
writer: The Hidden Persuaders; died Dec 12, 1996

1914 - Sun Ra (Herman Blount)
jazz musician: piano, organ, synthesizer; died May 30, 1993

1922 - Judith Crist (Klein)
TV critic: TV Guide, Saturday Review, Today Show

1924 - Charles Aznavour (Shahnour Varenagh Aznavurjian)
actor: Edith & Marcel, The Tin Drum, Twist, Ten Little Indians, Candy, Shoot the Piano Player; singer, songwriter

1926 - Elaine Leighton
drummer: played w/Billie Holiday

1927 - Michael Constantine (Constantine Joanides)
Emmy Award-winning actor: Room 222 [1969-70]; Sirota’s Court, Hey Landlord, The Hustler

1928 - Jackie (Jacqueline) Cain
singer: duo: Jackie & Roy [Kral]: Flamingo, Over the Rainbow, Euphoria, I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles

1931 - Kenny Ball
musician: trumpet: bandleader: Midnight In Moscow

1934 - Al Brown
entertainer: group: Al Brown & The Tunetoppers: LP: The Madison Dance Party

1934 - Peter Nero (Nierow)
pianist: Theme from the Summer of ’42

1938 - Richard Benjamin
actor: Goodbye Columbus, Diary of a Mad Housewife, He and She, Portnoy’s Complaint, Love at First Bite, The Sunshine Boys, Westworld; director: The Money Pit, Little Nikita, Made in America, Milk Money

1938 - Frank Converse
actor: Brother Future, Tales of the Unexpected, Home at Last, Cruise into Terror, N.Y.P.D., Movin’ On, The Family Tree, Coronet Blue, Dolphin Cove

1938 - Susan Strasberg
actress: The Marriage, Toma, Picnic, Rollercoaster, Delta Force; died Jan 21, 1999

1939 - Larry Siegfried
basketball: Boston Celtics

1939 - Paul Winfield
actor: Tyson, Breathing Lessons, Carbon Copy, Cliffhanger, Dennis the Menace, Presumed Innocent, Sounder, The Terminator, Star Trek 2; died Mar 7, 2004

1940 - Michael Sarrazin
actor: Lena’s Holiday, They Shoot Horses Don’t They, The Reincarnation of Peter Proud, The Flim Flam Man, For Pete’s Sake, Mascara, The Seduction

1940 - Mick Tingelhoff
football: Minnesota Vikings center: All-Pro team [1964, 65, 66, 67, 68, 68]

1942 - Barbara Parkins
actress: Peyton Place, Captains and the Kings, Valley of the Dolls, Calendar Girl Murders, The Deadly Trap

1943 - Tommy (Thomas Edward) John
baseball: pitcher: Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox [all-star: 1968], LA Dodgers [World Series: 1977, 1978/all-star: 1978], NY Yankees [all-star: 1979, 1980/World Series: 1981], California Angels, Oakland Athletics

1950 - Bernie Taupin
lyricist: Your Song, Friends, Rocket Man, Honkey Cat, Crocodile Rock, Daniel, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me; Elton John’s lyricist

1955 - Iva Davies
musician: guitar, singer: group: Icehouse

1959 - Morrissey (Stephen Morrissey)
singer: group: The Smiths: Hand in Glove, This Charming Man, What Difference Does It Make, Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now, William It Was Really Nothing, Reel Around the Fountain, Suffer Little Children, Bigmouth Strikes Again, That Joke isn’t Funny Anymore, Shakespeare’s Sister, Boy with the Thorn in His Side, The Queen is Dead, Frankly Mr. Shankly, Cemetry Gates

1970 - Naomi Campbell
model; writer: Swan; actress: Miami Rhapsody.

Chart Toppers
May 22 nd.

1950 My Foolish Heart - The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra (vocal: Eileen Wilson)
Bewitched - The Bill Snyder Orchestra
If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Birmingham Bounce - Red Foley

1958 All I Have to Do is Dream - The Everly Brothers
Return to Me - Dean Martin
Johnny B. Goode - Chuck Berry
Just Married - Marty Robbins

1966 Monday Monday - The Mamas & The Papas
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 - Bob Dylan
When a Man Loves a Woman - Percy Sledge
Distant Drums - Jim Reeves

1974 The Streak - Ray Stevens
Dancing Machine - The Jackson 5
The Entertainer - Marvin Hamlisch
Country Bumpkin - Cal Smith

1982 Ebony and Ivory - Paul McCartney with Stevie Wonder
Don’t Talk to Strangers - Rick Springfield
I’ve Never Been to Me - Charlene
Just to Satisfy You - Waylon & Willie

1990 Vogue - Madonna
All I Wanna Do is Make Love to You - Heart
Hold On - Wilson Phillips
Walkin’ Away - Clint Black


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-22-2007, 11:00 PM
143rd day of 2007 - 222 remaining.

Wednesday, May 23, 2007
MS. ATTORNEY DAY. :)

Believe it or not, women weren’t always allowed to become attorneys in the United States. The gavel was pounded for the first time when Belle Aurelia Babb was born on this day in 1846.

It took some 23 years, but Belle, who later changed her name to Arabella Mansfield, became the first woman admitted to the legal profession in the U.S. A teacher at Ohio Wesleyan college, Mansfield took the bar exam and passed. The legal beagles who tested her gave Arabella a passing grade saying, “...she gave the very best rebuke possible to the imputation that ladies cannot qualify for the practice of law.”

Ms. Mansfield took her law degree and put it away somewhere. You see, she never did practice law. Instead she became one of the first female college professors and administrators in the U.S. as the dean of the schools of art and music at DePauw University. She also helped found the Iowa Woman Suffrage Society.

Just knowing that she could become an attorney was enough for Ms. Mansfield. Women attorneys throughout the U.S. - all rise.

Events
May 23rd.


1788 - South Carolina, the colony originally named in honor of Charles I of England, became one of the United States on this day. The eighth state also has the dubious honor of being the first state to secede at the start of the Civil War in 1861. Its capital city is Columbia. The state bird is, appropriately, the Carolina wren. When a state has so many palmetto palms and beautiful jasmine flowers, what do you do? You choose the yellow jessamine (jasmine) as the state flower and call South Carolina the Palmetto State. Equal opportunity for the plants.

1827 - The first nursery school in the United States was established in New York City. The school was developed “to relieve parents of the laboring classes from the care of their children ... offering the children protection from weather, from idleness and contamination of evil example.” Yes, it actually meant that mommies and daddies who worked could drop the kiddies off for a truly fun, educational experience with little to fear. Plus, the youngsters got milk and cookies too!

1879 - Iowa State College, located in Ames, IA, established the first veterinary school in the U.S.

1922 - Abie’s Irish Rose opened at the the Fulton Theatre in New York City. The play continued for 2,327 performances and numerous revivals as well. It is estimated that some 50,000,000 people have seen the play performed somewhere in the world.

1922 - The first debate to be heard on radio was broadcast on WJH in Washington, DC. The two debaters argued about the topic of Daylight Saving Time with the audience acting as the judge.

1938 - LIFE magazine’s cover pictured the actor Errol Flynn as a glamour boy.

1938 - Singer Ray Eberle signed on as vocalist with the Glenn Miller Orchestra for $35 a week. Eberle’s first session with Miller included, Don’t Wake Up My Heart, for Brunswick Records.

1940 - Frank Sinatra, The Pied Pipers (with Jo Stafford) and the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra recorded the sentimental classic, I’ll Never Smile Again, for Victor Records. The tune remains one of Sinatra’s best-remembered performances.

1941 - Buddy Baer was disqualified at the beginning of the seventh round as Joe Louis defended his heavyweight boxing title for the 17th time. Baer’s manager refused to leave the ring when the round was ready to begin. Poor Buddy Baer...

1944 - Chicago University called it quits to sports when it announced plans to withdraw from the Big 10 Conference of the NCAA and all other athletic competition.

1949 - Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin lifted the Berlin Blockade. It had taken 10 months and 18 days of a continuous airlift of goods by the United States to foil Stalin’s attempt at isolating Berlin from the outside world. The U.S. kept more than 2.5 million Berliners in the Western sector of the German city from starvation and freezing ... supplying food, medicine, machinery, clothing and other necessities -- up to 13,000 tons per day. The airlift transormed West Berlin into a symbol of resistance to communism. During the blockade, the U.S. and its allies delivered 2,325,809 tons of supplies, including 23 tons of oranges. Two thirds of the tonage was coal to provide heat during the brutally-cold 1948-49 winter. The round-the-clock airlift, registered 277,804 flights, and a loss of 78 airmen, killed in crashes and other accidents.

1960 - Don and Phil, the Everly Brothers, enjoyed the day as their recording of Cathy’s Clown made it to number one on the hit music charts. The song stayed at number one for 5 weeks -- a big hit for the duo.

1962 - The National Basketball Association agreed to plans to transfer the Philadelphia Warriors to San Francisco, CA. The team became the San Francisco Warriors (now the Golden State Warriors).

1962 - Joe Pepitone of the New York Yankees set a major-league baseball record by hitting two home runs in one inning. The rare feat lifted the Yankees past the Kansas City Athletics by a score of 13-7.

1975 - Singer B.J. Thomas received a gold record for the single with the extremely long title, (Hey, Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song.

Birthdays
May 23 rd.

1734 - Franz Anton Mesmer
physician: used hypnotism and magnetism in treatments; Mesmerism named after him; died March 15, 1815

1810 - Margaret Fuller
journalist: The Dial, The New York Tribune; author: Women in the Nineteenth Century; feminist; killed [w/husband and two-year-old son] in shipwreck [off Long Island NY] July 19, 1850

1846 - Arabella Mansfield (Belle Aurelia Babb)
first woman admitted to legal profession in U.S.; died Aug 2, 1911; see Ms. Attorney Day [above]

1883 - Douglas Fairbanks (Douglas Elton Ulman)
actor: The Americano, He Comes Up Smiling, The Mollycoddle, The Mark of Zorro, The Three Musketeers, Robin Hood, The Thief of Bagdad, The Black Pirate, The Gaucho; formed United Artists with D.W. Griffith & Charlie Chaplin; died Dec 12, 1939

1890 - Herbert Marshall
actor: The Little Foxes, The Painted Veil, The Razor’s Edge, The Underworld Story, The Virgin Queen; radio serial: A Man Called X; died Jan 22, 1966

1910 - Scatman (Benjamin Sherman) Crothers
entertainer, actor: Petrocelli, Alfred Hitch**** Presents, Charlie’s Angels, Hill Street Blues, The Sins of Rachel Cade, Hello, Dolly!, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Silver Streak, Bronco Billy, Twilight Zone: The Movie; died Nov 22, 1986

1910 - Artie Shaw (Arthur Arschawsky)
musician: clarinet: bandleader: Begin The Beguine, Indian Love Call, Frenesi, Summit Ridge Drive, My Little Nest of Heavenly Blue, Back Bay Shuffle, Traffic Jam, Nightmare, The Blues, They Say, Thanks for Ev’rything, Stardust, Dancing in the Dark, Concerto for Clarinet, I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles, Any Old Time; died Dec 30, 2004

1912 - John Payne
actor: Miracle on 34th Street, The Razor’s Edge, Springtime in the Rockies, Tin Pan Alley, To the Shores of Tripoli; died Dec 6, 1989

1919 - Betty Garrett
actress: All in the Family, LaVerne & Shirley, My Sister Eileen, On the Town, Take Me Out to the Ball Game

1920 - Helen O’Connell
singer: Green Eyes, Amapola, Tangerine; married to bandleader, Frank DeVol; died Sep 9, 1993

1928 - Jeannie Carson (Jean Shufflebottom)
comedienne: Red Buttons Show; actress: Hey, Jeannie! [1956 TV Series: as Jeannie MacLennan], Rockets Galore!, Little Women [1958 TV], Search for Tomorrow [1951 TV soap: as Marcy Vincente]

1928 - Rosemary Clooney
singer: Hey There, Come On-A My House, This Ole House, Bye Bye Blackbird; actress: White Christmas, Deep in My Heart, Red Garters, Mangos, The Rosemary Clooney Show; aunt of actor George Clooney; sister of Nick Clooney, TV news anchor; died June 29, 2002

1928 - Nigel Davenport
actor: A Man for All Seasons, Chariots of Fire, Nighthawks, Picture of Dorian Gray

1929 - Julian Euell
jazz/studio musician: bass

1931 - Barbara Barrie (Berman)
actress: Barney Miller, Backstairs at the Whitehouse, Private Benjamin, Two of a Kind

1933 - Joan Collins
actress: Dynasty, The Stud; appeared in Playboy at age 50; sister of writer, Jackie Collins

1934 - Dr. Robert Moog
electronics inventor: Moog synthesizer; died Aug 21, 2005

1943 - Lee (Andrew) May
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [all-star: 1969, 1971/World Series: 1970], Houston Astros [all-star:1972], Baltimore Orioles [World Series: 1979], KC Royals

1943 - John Newcombe
tennis champion: Australian Open [1973, 1975], Wimbledon [1967, 1970, 1971], U.S. Open [1967, 1973]

1944 - Bob Leduc
hockey: WHA: Ottawa Nationals, Toronto Toros

1945 - Lauren Chapin
actress: Father Knows Best

1946 - David Graham
Australia’s golf champion: U.S. Open [1981], PGA [1979]

1948 - Reggie (Reginald Leslie) Cleveland
baseball: pitcher: St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox [World Series: 1975], Texas Rangers, Milwaukee Brewers

1951 - Anatoly Karpov
world chess champion: International Grandmaster

1952 - Butch (Clarence Edward) Metzger
baseball: pitcher: SF Giants [NL Rookie of the Year (w/Pat Zachry): 1976], SD Padres, SL Cardinals, NY Mets

1954 - Marvelous Marvin Hagler
International Boxing Hall of Famer: middleweight champion [1980-1987]; bouts: 67, won 62, lost 3, drew 2, KOs: 52; changed his legal name to Marvelous Marvin Hagler

1958 - Drew Carey
comedian, actor, producer, writer: The Drew Carey Show, Whose Line Is It Anyway?

Chart Toppers
May 23rd.


1951 Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
On Top of Old Smokey - The Weavers (vocal: Terry Gilkyson)
Too Young - Nat King Cole
Kentucky Waltz - Eddy Arnold

1959 The Happy Organ - Dave ‘Baby’ Cortez
A Teenager in Love - Dion & The Belmonts
Dream Lover - Bobby Darin
The Battle of New Orleans - Johnny Horton

1967 Groovin’ - The Young Rascals
Respect - Aretha Franklin
I Got Rhythm - The Happenings
Sam’s Place - Buck Owens

1975 Shining Star - Earth, Wind & Fire
Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender
Jackie Blue - Ozark Mountain Daredevils
I’m Not Lisa - Jessi Colter

1983 Let’s Dance - David Bowie
Flashdance...What a Feeling - Irene Cara
Little Red Corvette - Prince
Common Man - John Conlee

1991 I Like the Way (The Kissing Game) - Hi-Five
Touch Me (All Night Long) - Cathy Dennis
Here We Go - C + C Music Factory Presents Freedom Williams and Zelma
Davis
If I Know Me - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-23-2007, 11:00 PM
144th day of 2007 - 221 remaining.

Thursday, May 24, 2007
BOBBY ZIMMERMAN DAY. :)

You know the songs, Like a Rolling Stone; Lay Lady Lay; Positively 4th Street; Rainy Day Women #12 & 35; Hurricane [Part 1], (the latter dedicated to imprisoned boxer Rubin Hurricane Carter, a convicted murderer); and you’re familiar with the nasal tones of Bob Dylan, the voice that made his words famous. Bob Dylan was born Robert Zimmerman on this day in 1941. One of Zimmerman’s many stories as to why the name change says he borrowed it from poet Dylan Thomas. Bobby Zimmerman legally changed his name to Bob Dylan in 1962.

One story (some doubt its validity) is that Bobby Zimmerman was a piano player for a 1960s singer who had him fired for “not having a future in the music business.” That singer was Bobby Vee. Luckily, Dylan didn’t listen and moved from the Iron Range of Minnesota, near Duluth, to New York City where he played folk clubs in Greenwich Village. It was there, in 1961, that his talents were recognized and he was signed to CBS Records. His electric folk/rock sound soon became a trademark and put him miles ahead of his contemporaries. Yet folk purists booed him off the stage at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1965.

Dylan retired for a short time following a 1966 motorcycle accident; received an honorary doctorate degree from Princeton University in 1970; then performed for George Harrison’s Concert for Bangla Desh in 1971. Two years later, he made his acting debut in the film, Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid; then made the four-hour film, Renaldo and Clara with Joan Baez in 1978. That same year, Dylan announced that he had become a born-again Christian; his newly-found faith apparent in his recordings of that time: Precious Angel, When He Returns and Gotta Serve Somebody, which won him his first Grammy in 1980.

Bob Dylan was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 and earned the Lifetime Achievement Grammy in 1991. Ten years later he added a Golden Globe and an Academy Award to his collection for the song, Things Have Changed from the 2000 film, Wonder Boys. Little Bobby Zimmerman definitely made a name for himself in the history books of rock ’n’ roll. If you want to know what it’s like to ride the waves of success and defeat, ask Bob Dylan. He knows how it feels...

Events
May 24th.


1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse tapped out the message “What hath God wrought” in Morse Code. The development inaugurated America’s telegraph industry. The message was sent from Washington, DC to Baltimore, MD.

1859 - Madame Caroline Miolan-Carvalho sang Charles Gounod’s Ave Maria in its first public performance.

1883 - The Brooklyn Bridge, linking Manhattan and Brooklyn in New York City, officially opened. At the time, it was the world’s longest suspension bridge. It is held together with 5,296 bound-steel cables. The Brooklyn Bridge, designed by John A. Roebling, took 14 years to build. The span is 1,595 feet long, cost $16 million to construct and no, it’s not for sale!

1899 - W. T. McCullough of Boston, MA opened the first public garage. One could rent space for selling, storing and repairing vehicles.

1913 - The U.S. Department of Labor entered into its first strike mediation. The dispute of the Railroad Clerks of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad was settled nine days later.

1931 - The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) began service on the Columbian run between New York City and Washington, DC. The passenger train was the first train with air conditioning throughout.

1935 - The first major-league baseball game to be played under the lights saw the Cincinnati Reds defeat Philadelphia 2-1 at Crosley Field.

1938 - Art Kassel’s orchestra recorded a song for Bluebird Records that may not have been a smash hit, but had a title to die for: So You Left Me for the Leader of a Swing Band.

1950 - ‘Sweetwater’ (Nat) Clifton’s contract was purchased by the New York Knicks. Sweetwater played for the Harlem Globetrotters and was the first black player in the NBA.

1953 - A previously unknown actor, Rod Steiger, starred in Marty on the Goodyear Playhouse. Paddy Chayefsky wrote the original TV play and then adapted it for the Oscar-winning film.

1954 - The first traveling sidewalk in a railroad station was moving right along on this, its first day of operation, in Jersey City, NJ.

1969 - The Beatles hit number one with Get Back. The song stayed parked at the top of the hit heap for five weeks.

1974 - After nine years on TV, the last Dean Martin Show was seen on NBC. Dean’s lovely group, The Golddiggers, returned to bid farewell in the show that had been seen in a variety of formats on Thursday and, later, on Friday evenings.

1981 - Bobby Unser was first to the checkered flag for his third major victory since 1968. He won the ‘Greatest Spectacle in Racing,’ the Indianapolis 500. The victory, however, was short lived, as race stewards took the win away from Unser the next day and awarded it to Mario Andretti. It was the first time a driver had been stripped of the championship. Race officials, looking at videotape, said that Unser had violated the caution light rule and penalized him one lap. Oooops.

1983 - The Brooklyn Bridge celebrated its 100th birthday with a huge fireworks display. Ooh, ah... Oh, it’s still not for sale!

1984 - Ralph Sampson, one of the twin towers of the NBA’s Houston Rockets, became the first unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year since Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabar) of the Milwaukee Bucks in 1970.

1986 - Montreal skated past Calgary 4-3 to capture its 23rd National Hockey League Stanley Cup championship. No other major North American pro sports franchise had earned as many titles.

1986 - Whitney Houston’s Greatest Love of All was starting week number two of a three-week stay at number one ... one ... one...

2000 - Anthony Landini sold his pair of ruby slippers at Christie’s East, New York. Landini had purchased the slippers in 1988 for $165,000. The pair was one of several worn by Dorothy (Judy Garland) in the movie, The Wizzard of Oz. Landini had grabbed the slippers at an auction at Christie’s. He sold them at that same auction house 12 years later to movie memorabilia collector David Elkouby, who paid $600,000, plus a $66,000 commission. After the auction, Landini was quoted as saying, “There’s no place like Christie’s.” “There’s no place like Christie’s.”

Birthdays
May 24th.

1686 - Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit
physicist: developed system for cleaning mercury to keep it from sticking to glass; inventor: alcohol thermometer [1709], mercury thermometer [1714]; created measure of temperature which bears his name [1724]; died Sep 16, 1736

1816 - Emanuel Leutze
artist: Washington Crossing the Delaware, Washington Rallying the Troops at Monmouth, Columbus Before the Queen; died July 18, 1868

1883 - Elsa Maxwell
gossip columnist, actress: Our Betters, Elsa Maxwell’s Hotel for Women, The Lady and the Lug; died Nov 1, 1963

1887 - Mick (Edward) Mannock
WWI flying ace [Great Britain]: 73 hits; killed when his plane was shot down July 26, 1918

1895 - Samuel I. (Irving) Newhouse
billionaire in communications and publishing industry: newspapers, magazines, TV, cable TV, radio stations; died Aug 29, 1979

1914 - Lilli Palmer (Lillie Marie Peiser)
actress: Chamber of Horrors, Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Boys from Brazil; died Jan 27, 1986

1937 - Tim Brown
football: Baltimore Colts running back: Super Bowl III

1938 - Tommy Chong
comedian: half of comedy team: Cheech and Chong

1941 - Bob Dylan (Robert Allen Zimmerman)
singer, songwriter: see Bobby Zimmerman Day [above]

1942 - Derek Quinn
musician: guitar: group: Freddie and the Dreamers: If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody, I’m Telling You Now, You Were Made for Me, I Understand, Do the Freddie

1943 - Gary Burghoff
Emmy Award-winning actor: M*A*S*H; Casino, Small Kill

1944 - Patti LaBelle (Patricia Louise Holte)
singer: Down the Aisle, Lady Marmalade, On My Own, New Attitude

1945 - Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (Priscilla Ann Wagner)
actress: Dallas, Naked Gun series; mother of Lisa Marie Presley, was married to Elvis Presley; coexecutor of the Elvis Presley estate, Priscilla transformed Graceland into a $50-million business

1946 - Ellie (Eliseo Delgado) Rodriguez
baseball: catcher: NY Yankees, KC Royals [all-star: 1969], Milwaukee Brewers [all-star: 1972], California Angels, LA Dodgers

1948 - Judith Kahan
actress: Mary, The Hogan Family, Ferris Bueller, Doc, All’s Fair

1950 - Jo Ann Washam
golf: champ: Portland LPGA [1975]

1951 - Dwight McDonald
football: San Diego State Univ.

1953 - Alfred Molina
actor: Dead Man, Letter to Brezhnev, Ladyhawke, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Ladies Man, Chocolat, Murder on the Orient Express [TV: 2001]

1955 - Roseanne Cash
singer: LPs: Right Or Wrong, King’s Record Shop, Interiors, 10 Song Demo; writer: Bodies of Water; daughter of Johnny Cash

1969 - Rich Robinson
musician: guitar: group: The Black Crowes: LPs: Shake Your Money Maker, The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion, Amorica, Three Snakes and One Charm.

Chart Toppers
May 24th.

1944 Long Ago and Far Away - Helen Forrest & Dick Haymes
San Fernando Valley - Bing Crosby
I’ll Get By - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Dick Haymes)
Straighten Up and Fly Right - King Cole Trio

1952 Kiss of Fire - Georgia Gibbs
Blue Tango - The Leroy Anderson Orchestra
Be Anything - Eddy Howard
The Wild Side of Life - Hank Thompson

1960 Cathy’s Clown - The Everly Brothers
Good Timin’ - Jimmy Jones
Cradle of Love - Johnny Preston
Please Help Me, I’m Falling - Hank Lockin

1968 Tighten Up - Archie Bell & The Drells
Mrs. Robinson - Simon & Garfunkel
A Beautiful Morning - The Rascals
I Wanna Live - Glen Campbell

1976 Silly Love Songs - Wings
Love Hangover - Diana Ross
Fooled Around and Fell in Love - Elvin Bishop
After All the Good is Gone - Conway Twitty

1984 Hello - Lionel Richie
Let’s Hear It for the Boy - Deniece Williams
Time After Time - Cyndi Lauper
To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before - Julio Iglesias & Willie Nelson


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-24-2007, 11:00 PM
145th day of 2007 - 220 remaining.

Friday, May 25, 2007
BOJANGLES DAY. :)

Sammy Davis, Jr. and Shirley Temple’s tap-dancing coach, Luther ‘Bill’ Robinson, was born in 1878 on this day in Richmond, Virginia. By 1935, he was dancing up a storm with the curly-haired child-star in such movies as The Little Colonel and The Littlest Rebel. These two, along with Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm and Just Around the Corner in 1938, catapulted Mr. Robinson to fame ... international fame.

Robinson spent most of his childhood dancing in vaudeville. In 1928 he debuted on Broadway in Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1928 and danced in Ain’t Misbehavin’ in 1929. 1932 was a year of firsts for the tap-dancing Robinson. First, his tap dancing was recorded on Doin’ the New Low Down, with Don Redman, the first time anyone’s dancing was recorded. Then he starred in the first all-black talkie film, Harlems Heaven.

Bill Robinson, more recognized by his nickname, Mr. Bojangles, than by his birth name, and known to many as the Mayor of Harlem, was personified in music. First Duke Ellington recorded Bojangles, a musical portrait of the man, in 1940. Then The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band recorded Mr. Bojangles, a top-ten hit record in 1971.

Fame, however, didn’t bring him fortune. Robinson died penniless in 1949.

We can still hear his tapping and can see his fast-moving feet. Mr. Bojangles, dance ...

Events
May 25th.


1927 - The Ford Motor Company announced that its popular automobile model, the Model T, known as the Tin Lizzie, would not be rolling off assembly lines anymore. Instead, the discontinued car would be replaced by the more modern Model A. The first Model T was manufactured in 1908, designed, the Ford Motor Company stated, “as an inexpensive vehicle for the great multitude.” It was also the first item produced on an assembly line (Henry Ford’s new production system). By 1918, half of all motor cars in the entire world were Tin Lizzies.

1927 - The Movietone News was shown for the first time at the Sam Harris Theatre in New York City. Charles Lindbergh’s epic flight aboard the Spirit of St. Louis was featured. These newsreels were produced for showing in theatres until 1967 when competition from TV news forced them into extinction.

1935 - Babe Ruth, then of the Boston Braves, hit home runs 713 and 714 on this day at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh -- home of the Pirates. These would be the last round-trippers for the ‘Sultan of Swat’. The Bucs, however, still beat the Braves, 11-7. Guy Bush is credited with serving up the historic home runs to Ruth.

1935 - This was “the greatest day in the history of track,” according to The New York Times. Jesse Owens of Ohio State University broke two world sprint records, tied a third, and broke a long-jump world record in a meet at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

1939 - An audience of 18,000 people waited patiently at Madison Square Garden in New York City to hear the piano virtuoso Ignace Jan Paderewski begin a much-anticipated piano recital. However, the 78-year-old former premier of Poland was unable to perform for the enormous crowd. Paderewski suffered from ‘chilled fingers’, a severe arthritic condition that made it impossible for him to play the piano.

1965 - From the Look But Don’t Blink file: A very short, heavyweight title fight happened in Lewiston, ME. Cassius Clay knocked out challenger Sonny Liston in one minute and 56 seconds of the first round. Liston never saw the punch coming. Neither did an unbelieving crowd at ringside, nor those in theatres all over the world watching the fight on closed-circuit TV. The phantom punch was never explained, but Liston was knocked cold from whatever Clay threw at him.

1981 - From the Don’t Try This at Home, Kids file: Twenty-five year old Dan Goodwin was looking to have some fun. So, with nothing but three suction cups and a Spiderman cartoon costume, Goodwin began to scale the world’s tallest building -- the Sears Tower in Chicago, IL. Goodwin climbed for six hours, with Chicago’s boys in blue doing their best to safely stop him from the perilous climb. When Goodwin reached the 50th floor of the skyscraper, he stopped for a few minutes, talked with the police and, assuring them of his safety, made the rest of the climb in about an hour. The police had agreed not to bother him until he got to the top where he was arrested for trespassing. Goodwin was released after paying a fine.

1983 - Return of the Jedi, topped all previous opening day box office records with a gross of $6,219,629. It opened on 1,002 movie screens around the U.S.

1984 - The Detroit Tigers tied the 1916 New York Giants as they won their 17th road game in a row, beating the California Angels 5-1. That game broke the American League mark of 16 that was previously held by the Washington Senators -- dating back to 1912. The Seattle Mariners put a stop to that streak the following night, defeating Detroit 7-3.

1985 - CBS radio began network baseball coverage for the first time in 25 years as Brent Musburger called the play-by-play for the Los Angeles Dodgers-New York Mets game. The Mutual Broadcasting System was the last radio network to have offered regular coverage of baseball back in 1960.

1985 - The pop/rock group, Wham!, featuring George Michael, became the first group since the Bee Gees in 1979 to place three consecutive singles in the number one spot on the music charts. Everything She Wants started a 2-week run at number one on this day. The other Wham! number one-ers were Careless Whisper (2/16/85 - 3 weeks) and Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go (11/17/84 - 3 weeks).

1998 - St. Louis Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire made baseball history this day. The major-league player hit his 25th home run before June 1. Until this home run in the first inning of a game against the Colorado Rockies, McGwire was tied with Ken Griffey Jr., the only players in major-league history to hit 24 home runs before June 1 in a baseball season. McGwire finished out the month with a total of 27 home runs, the 26th on May 29th, and the 27th HR the next day, both against the San Diego Padres. These homers also gave McGwire the distinction of breaking the record for most home runs hit in one month (17) for the St. Louis ball club, a record he previously held with 15.

Birthdays
May 25 th.

1803 - Ralph Waldo Emerson
writer: Essays, Representative Men, Nature; poet: Days; editor: The Dial; died Apr 27, 1882

1878 - Bill ‘Bojangles’ (Luther) Robinson
vaudeville dancer; died Nov 25, 1949; see Bojangles Day [above]

1886 - Philip Murray
labor leader: founded Congress of Industrial Organizations [CIO]: “Unions are created to make living conditions just a little better than they were before they were created, and the union that does not manifest that kind of interest in human beings cannot endure.”; died in 1952

1889 - Igor Sikorsky
engineer: developed 1st successful helicopter; died Oct 26, 1972

1898 - Gene (James Joseph) Tunney
World Heavyweight Boxing Champion [1926]; died July 11, 1978

1915 - Ginny Simms
singer, actress: That’s Right You’re Wrong [1939], Seven Days’ Leave [1942], Broadway Rhythm [1944], Disc Jockey [1951]; died Apr 4, 1994

1918 - Claude Akins
actor: The Caine Mutiny, From Here to Eternity, Rio Bravo, Battle for the Planet of the Apes, Inherit the Wind, B.J. and the Bear, Austin City Limits; died Jan 27, 1994

1919 - Lindsay Nelson
sportscaster: CBS Sports, Cotton Bowl Football, NCAA College Football, New York Mets, San Francisco Giants; author: Hello Everybody, I’m Lindsay Nelson; died June 15, 1995

1921 - Hal David
Oscar-winning songwriter [w/Burt Bacharach (music)]: Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head [1969]; The Four Winds and the Seven Seas, American Beauty Rose, Broken-Hearted Melody; w/Burt Bacharach: The Story of My Life, Magic Moments; president of ASCAP

1923 - John Weitz
fashion designer: “Underwhelm them.”

1925 - Jeanne Crain
actress: Pinky, State Fair, People Will Talk; died Dec 14, 2003

1926 - Bill Sharman
Basketball Hall of Famer: Boston Celtics NBA Champion teams [1957, 1959, 1960, 1961]; coach: NBA Coach of the Year: LA Lakers, Lakers General Manager & President

1926 - Kitty Kallen (Genevieve Agostinello)
singer: Little Things Mean a Lot, Go on with the Wedding [w/George Shaw], If I Give My Heart to You, My Coloring Book

1926 - Miles (Dewey) Davis III
jazz trumpet/flugelhorn musician: combined be-bop, modal chord progressions and rock rhythms to create ‘cool jazz’; died: Sep 28, 1991

1927 - Robert Ludlum
novelist: The Gemini Contenders, The Rhinemann Exchange; died Mar 12, 2001

1929 - Beverly Sills (Belle Silverman)
opera soprano; chairperson of Lincoln Center; National Chair of March of Dimes’ Mothers’ March on Birth Defects

1932 - K.C. Jones
Basketball Hall of Famer: Boston Celtics; Olympic Gold Medalist [1956]; head coach: Boston Celtics, Capitol Bullets, San Diego Conquistadors, Brandeis University

1934 - Ron Nessen
newsman: NBC; White House Press Secretary: Ford administration; president Mutual News

1935 - Cookie Gilchrist
football: Buffalo Bills [shares record of 5 touchdowns in a game (Dec. 8, 1963) w/Jim Brown, Ernie Nevers and James Stewart]

1936 - Tom T. Hall
singer: P.S. I Love You; songwriter: Harper Valley P.T.A.; syndicated host: Pop Goes the Country, The Nashville Network

1938 - Raymond Carver
poet: A New Path to the Waterfall; died Aug 2, 1988

1939 - Dixie Carter
actress: Family Law, Designing Women, Diff’rent Strokes, Gambler V: Playing for Keeps, Ladies Man

1939 - Sir Ian McKellen
Tony Award-winning actor: Amadeus [1981]; Jack and Sarah, Richard III, The Shadow, Six Degrees of Separation, And the Band Played On, Windmills of the Gods, The Scarlet Pimpernel, Last Action Hero

1943 - John ‘Poli’ Palmer
musician: sax, flute, keyboard: group: Family: No Mule’s Fool, Weaver’s Answer, In My Own Time, Burlesque

1943 - Leslie Uggams
singer: Sing Along with Mitch, The Leslie Uggams Show; actress: Skyjacked, Roots, Backstairs at the White House, All My Children

1944 - Frank Oz (Richard Frank Oznowicz)
puppeteer: voice of Miss Piggy

1947 - Jessi Colter (Mirian Johnson)
country singer: I’m Not Lisa; widow of singer Waylon Jennings

1947 - Mitch Margo
singer: groups: Cross Country: In the Midnight Hour; The Tokens: Tonight I Fell in Love, The Lion Sleeps Tonight

1947 - Karen Valentine
actress: Room 222, Karen, The Love Boat, Children in the Crossfire

1948 - Klaus Meine
singer: group: Scorpions: LPs: Animal Magnetism, Love at First Sting, World Wide Live

1950 - John (Joseph) Montefusco
‘The Count of Montefusco’: baseball [pitcher]: SF Giants [all-star: 1976], Atlanta Braves, SD Padres, NY Yankees

1955 - Connie Sellecca
actress: Hotel, The Great American Hero, The Brotherhood of the Rose

1971 - Justin Henry
actor: Andersonville, Sixteen Candles, Kramer vs. Kramer.

Chart Toppers
May 25 th.

1945 Dream - The Pied Pipers
Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
Sentimental Journey - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
At Mail Call Today - Gene Autry

1953 Song from Moulin Rouge - The Percy Faith Orchestra
I Believe - Frankie Laine
April in Portugal - The Les Baxter Orchestra
Mexican Joe - Jim Reeves

1961 Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
Daddy’s Home - Shep & The Limelites
Travelin’ Man - Ricky Nelson
Hello Walls - Faron Young

1969 Get Back - The Beatles
Love (Can Make You Happy) - Mercy
Oh Happy Day - The Edwin Hawkins’ Singers
My Life (Throw It Away if I Want To) - Bill Anderson

1977 Sir Duke - Stevie Wonder
Couldn’t Get It Right - Climax Blues Band
I’m Your Boogie Man - KC & The Sunshine Band
Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love) - Waylon Jennings

1985 Everything She Wants - Wham!
Everybody Wants to Rule the World - Tears for Fears
Axel F - Harold Faltermeyer
Radio Heart - Charly McClain


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-25-2007, 11:00 PM
146th day of 2007 - 219 remaining.

Saturday, May 26, 2007
THE DUKE DAY. :)

Born Marion Morrison on this day in 1907 in Winterset, Iowa, John ‘Duke’ Wayne became the archetypical image of the American hero. His fifty-year film career began in the 1930s in low-budget Westerns.

The Duke’s first major role was in Stagecoach where he played the part of the Ringo Kid. It was while he was working on this film that John Wayne began his long-term association with director John Ford. The two worked so well together that Wayne was cast in Ford’s top pictures, Fort Apache, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, The Searchers, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, They Were Expendable, and The Quiet Man.

Wayne was most often cast in Westerns and war movies, winning an Academy Award for his performance in True Grit in 1969, and directing and starring in the 1960 epic western, The Alamo, and the 1968 war film, The Green Berets (prompted by his superpatriotism).

Critics panned him, audiences loved him. The big, slow-talking actor was not only a superpatriot, but a super hero. And he played that role in his personal life, too. Battling cancer, and surviving his first cancer operation, he said that he had “licked the Big C.” His final role (1976) was in another western, The Shootist. He played the part of a gunfighter who had cancer. The Duke died in 1979. This was one fight he couldn’t win.

John ‘Duke’ Wayne once gave some advice to would-be actors: “Talk low, talk slow and don’t say too much.” It was good advice for all.

Events
May 26th.

1913 - Actors’ Equity Association was organized in New York City.

1928 - Andrew Payne ran 3,422 miles in 84 days in a time of 573 hours, 4 minutes and 34 seconds to win the Bunion Derby that ended at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Upon reaching the finish line of the grueling run, Mr. Payne was heard to exclaim, “Yeeeeeowwwwww! My dawgs’ are on fire!”

1937 - Lionel Hampton and his band recorded the classic, Flying Home, for Decca Records.

1940 - Invitation to Learning was first heard on CBS radio. The educational radio program ran for 15 years on the network.

1954 - Liberace presented a three-hour, one-man concert at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Look at the official attendance: 13,000 women and 3,000 men! The performance nearly broke the box office mark of 18,000 set by pianist Ignace Jan Paderewski.

1956 - The first trailer bank opened for business in Locust Grove, Long Island, NY. The 46-foot-long trailer took in $100,000 in deposits its very first day.

1959 - Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher, Harvey Haddix, threw a no-hitter for 12 innings; but lost to the Milwaukee Braves 1-0 in the 13th inning. That’s when Braves slugger Joe Ad**** whacked a home run to win the game.

1961 - Dave Garroway told the NBC-TV brass that he was ready to retire. “I want to give up the Today show,” he said, “to stop talking awhile and start looking, thinking and listening to people.” Garroway voiced his trademark, “Peace,” with palm facing the camera, for the last time, after 10 years of early morning informing and entertaining.

1969 - Dick Cavett began a prime time summer TV series three nights a week on ABC. The critics said, “It’s two nights and three quarters of one too much for Cavett.” Within two years, ABC decided that Cavett would be the star of its late night offering five nights a week against Johnny Carson. Guess who kept his job?

1973 - Kathy Schmidt set an American women’s javelin record with a toss of 207 feet, 10 inches in Modesto, CA.

1977 - The man called The Human Fly, George Willig, did the impossible. He scaled the World Trade Center in New York City, by fixing himself up to the window washer mechanism and walking straight up until falling into police custody when he reached the top! It took Willig three and a half hours to make the climb, and $1.10 in fines - a penny per floor.

1985 - A.J. Foyt made it to his 30th Indianapolis 500 as he got his sluggish Indy-car to start. In addition to winning four Indianapolis 500s as a driver, A.J. Foyt won the 1972 Daytona 500 and the 24 Hours of LeMans, making him the only man to have won the crown jewels of Indy car, NASCAR Winston Cup and international sports car racing.

1986 - Sylvester Stallone set a sales record for a non-sequel film with the release of Cobra. Ticket sales for the opening day premiere were $12.4 million.

Birthdays
May 26th.

1799 - Alexander Pushkin
poet: Eugene Onegin, The Bronze Horseman, Ruslan and Lyudmila, Southern Verse Tales; playwright: Boris Godunov; novelist: Tales of Belkin, The Captain’s Daughter; died Jan 29, 1837 [mortally wounded in a duel Jan 27]

1886 - Al Jolson (Asa Yoelson)
singer: Sonny Boy; actor: The Jazz Singer, Rhapsody in Blue, Rose of Washington Square; died Oct 23, 1950

1893 - Norma Talmadge
actress: The Forbidden City, The Social Secretary, Dubarry; died Dec 24, 1957

1907 - John Wayne (Marion Morrison)
Academy Award-winning actor: True Grit [1969]; died June 11, 1979; see The Duke Day [above]

1908 - Robert Morley (Adolph Milton)
actor: Marie Antoinette, Around the World in 80 Days, The African Queen, War and Remembrance, Of Human Bondage, Istanbul; producer; died June 3, 1992

1910 - Laurance S. Rockefeller
conservationist: donated 92 acres on the top of Sage Mountain for British Virgin Islands’s first national park [1964]; died July 11, 2004

1911 - Ben Alexander (Nicholas Benton Alexander)
actor: All Quiet on the Western Front, Dragnet; died July 5, 1969

1913 - Peter Cushing
actor: Star Wars, Tales from the Crypt, The Evil of Frankenstein, The Horror of Dracula, The House That Dripped Blood; died Aug 11, 1994

1920 - Peggy Lee (Norma Delores Egstrom)
singer: Fever, It’s a Good Day, I Hear Music, The Folks Who Live on the Hill, I’m Just Wild About Harry, I’ve Got the World on a String, Mr. Wonderful; actress: Mister Music, The Jazz Singer, Pete Kelley’s Blues, Is That All There Is?; sang for: Lady and the Tramp; died Jan 21, 2002

1923 - James Arness (Aurness)
actor: Gunsmoke, How the West was Won, Hondo, The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory; Minneapolis, MN radio newscaster; brother of Peter Graves

1927 - Jacques Bergerac
actor: Twist of Fate, Les Girls, Gigi, A Global Affair, Missione speciale Lady Chaplin

1939 - Brent Musburger
sportscaster: ABC Sports, CBS Sports

1940 - Levon Helm
musician: drums, singer: groups: The Band, Hawks, Levon and the Hawks, Crackers, Canadian Squires

1941 - Cliff Drysdale
tennis: first president of the Association of Tennis Professionals [ATP: 1972-74]; ESPN commentator

1942 - Ray Ennis
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Swinging Blue Jeans: Hippy Hippy Shake

1942 - Chuck (Charles Oscar) Hartenstein
‘Twiggy’: baseball: pitcher: Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Red Sox, SL Cardinals, Toronto Blue Jays

1944 - Verden Allen
musician: keyboards: group: Mott the Hoople: All the Young Dudes, Ballad of Mott, All the Way to Memphis

1944 - Sam Posey
auto racer; radio/TV race commentator

1945 - Garry Peterson
musician: drums: The Guess Who: These Eyes, Laughing, No Time, American Woman, Share the Land, Clap for the Wolfman

1947 - Darrell (Wayne) Evans
baseball: Atlanta Braves [all-star: 1973], SF Giants [all-star: 1983], Detroit Tigers [World Series: 1984]

1948 - Stevie (Stephanie) Nicks
songwriter: Edge of Seventeen; singer: group: Fleetwood Mac: Dreams, Don’t Stop; solo: Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around [w/Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers], Leather & Lace [w/Don Henley], Stand Back, Talk to Me

1949 - Dan Pastorini
football: Houston Oilers; football handicapper

1949 - Philip Michael Thomas
actor: Miami Vice, Hair, False Witness, A Fight for Jenny, Homeboy

1949 - Hank Williams Jr.
singer: All My Rowdy Friends Have Gone and Settled Down, Whiskey Bent and Hell-Bound, Family Tradition, Raining in My Heart, I’ve Got a Right to Cry, I’d Rather Be Gone, I Fought the Law, Are You Ready? [ABC Monday Night Football intro]; movie soundtrack: Your Cheatin’ Heart

1951 - Sally Ride
astronaut: first American woman in space: Challenger shuttle [1983]

1959 - Wayne Hussey
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Mission: LPs Gods Own Medicine, The First Chapter, Salad Daze, Neverland, Ever After

1962 - Genie Francis
actress: General Hospital, North and South, Book I & II, Bare Essence

1962 - Bob(cat) Goldthwait
actor: Out There, Destiny Turns on the Radio, Scrooged, Police Academy series, One Crazy Summer, voice of Muggle in Capitol Critters, voice of Mr. Floppy in Unhappily Ever After

1964 - Lenny Kravitz
singer, songwriter: Are You Gonna Go My Way?

1966 - Helena Bonham Carter
actress: Mighty Aphrodite, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Howard’s End, Where Angels Fear to Tread, Hamlet, A Room with a View, Lady Jane.

Chart Toppers
May 26th.


1946 The Gypsy - The Ink Spots
All Through the Day - Perry Como
Laughing on the Outside - The Sammy Kaye Orchestra (vocal: Billy
Williams)
New Spanish Two Step - Bob Wills

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Little Things Mean a Lot - Kitty Kallen
Man Upstairs - Kay Starr
I Really Don’t Want to Know - Eddy Arnold

1962 Stranger on the Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk
I Can’t Stop Loving You - Ray Charles
Old Rivers - Walter Brennan
She Thinks I Still Care - George Jones

1970 American Woman/No Sugar Tonight - The Guess Who
Turn Back the Hands of Time - Tyrone Davis
Everything is Beautiful - Ray Stevens
My Love - Sonny James

1978 With a Little Luck - Wings
Too Much, Too Little, Too Late - Johnny Mathis/Deniece Williams
You’re the One that I Want - John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John
She Can Put Her Shoes Under My Bed (Anytime) - Johnny Duncan

1986 Greatest Love of All - Whitney Houston
Live to Tell - Madonna
On My Own - Patti LaBelle & Michael McDonald
Tomb of the Unknown Love -Kenny Rogers


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-26-2007, 11:00 PM
147th day of 2007 - 218 remaining.

Sunday, May 27, 2007
BLOOMER DAY. :D

Amelia Jenks Bloomer was born on this day in 1818. Amelia was a women’s rights advocate (you didn’t know the folks back in the mid 1800s even knew about women’s rights, did you?). She was also a social reformer; and yes, bloomer panties were named after her.

You see, she worked for more sensible dress for women ... and recommended what was called the Bloomer Costume in 1849. Actually Elizabeth Smith Miller introduced the costume but ‘bloomers’ sounded more interesting than ‘millers’.

Today, those ruffled little pants aren’t worn much by adult women but they often cover baby bottoms. Babies don’t seem to mind wearing those sensible bloomers.

Events
May 27th.


1823 - American Eclipse won two out of three heats to beat Henry at Union Course in New York. The race was called the most famous horse race of the 19th century.

1873 - Survivor won the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico race track in Baltimore, MD. It was the first ‘Run for the Black-Eyed Susans’. The race continues as the second jewel in horse racing’s Triple Crown. It comes two weeks after the Kentucky Derby and prior to the Belmont Stakes in New York.

1926 - The people of Hannibal, MO erected the first statue of literary characters. The bronze figures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer were hoisted above a red granite base.

1936 - The maiden voyage of the ship RMS Queen Mary began. The huge vessel set sail from Southampton, England headed for the New York Harbor in the U.S.

1937 - Ceremonies marking the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge were held in San Francisco, CA. The bridge has been called one of the greatest engineering marvels in the world.

1950 - Frank Sinatra made his TV debut as he appeared on NBC’s Star-Spangled Review with show biz legend, Bob Hope.

1955 - The census clock at the Department of Commerce Building in Washington, DC recorded a U.S. population of 165,000,000 at 8:51 a.m. Those clever people at the DOC figured out that this meant that a baby was being born every eight seconds in the USA.

1957 - Senator Theodore F. Green of Rhode Island became the oldest person to serve in the U.S. Congress. At the time, Sen. Green was 89 years, 7 months and 26 days young.

1957 - That’ll be the Day, by The Crickets and featuring Buddy Holly, was released by Brunswick Records. On September 14th, the tune became the most popular record in the U.S. It was the first hit for Holly and his group after two previous releases went nowhere on Decca Records in 1956.

1961 - Singer, Johnny Cash turned TV actor. He appeared on the NBC drama, The Deputy.

1968 - George Halas retired as head coach of the Chicago Bears. Halas spent 48 years as coach of the Bears and led them to six National Football League titles.

1985 - Spend-A-Buck won the Jersey Derby by a neck and earned a record $2.6 million. The thoroughbred won an extra $2 million dollars for sweeping the Jersey Derby, the Garden State Stakes, the Cherry Hill Mile and the Kentucky Derby. Career earnings for the horse were $3,009,509.

1985 - The Boston Celtics defeated the Los Angeles Lakers, 148-114, in the first game of the NBA championship series, setting a new record for total points by a team.

1986 - Mel Fisher found a jar on this day. The jar contained 2,300 emeralds and was recovered from the Spanish ship Atocha, which sank in the 17th century. The value of the emeralds was said to be “mutli, multimillions” of dollars. However, we did recently see some similarities in cubic zerconia-emeralds on the Home Shopping Network for $29.95 each. Plus, a free mop if you could call in before the clock wound down...

Birthdays
May 27th.

1794 - Cornelius Vanderbilt
capitalist: established ferry service between Manhattan & Staten Islands; turned a NY railroad into $$$; died Jan 4, 1877

1818 - Amelia Jenks Bloomer
women’s rights advocate; newspaper publisher: The Lily; social reformer; led cause for more sensible dress for women: bloomer panties named after her; died Dec 30, 1894; see Bloomer Day [above]

1837 - Wild Bill (James Butler) Hickok
U.S. Marshall, frontiersman, army scout, gambler, legendary marksman; shot [from behind] and killed Aug 2, 1876 while playing poker holding a pair of aces and a pair of eights [known since as the ‘dead man’s hand’]

1867 - Arnold Bennett
novelist: The Old Wives’ Tale, How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day; died Mar 27, 1931

1878 - Isadora Duncan
dancer: revolutionized the concept of dance: changing ballet into interpretive dance; killed in freak accident Sep 15, 1927 [strangled when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the car she was riding in]

1894 - Dashiell Hammett
author: The Maltese Falcon, The Thin Man, The Glass Key, Red Harvest, The Dain Curse; died Jan 10, 1961

1907 - Rachel Carson
author: Silent Spring, The Sea Around Us; died Apr 14, 1964

1911 - Hubert Horatio Humphrey
38th vice president of the U.S.; died Jan 13, 1978

1911 - Vincent (Leonard) Price
actor: Edward Scissorhands, House of Wax, The Raven, Laura, The Three Musketeers, Twice-told Tales; recording: Thriller [w/Michael Jackson]; author: cookbooks; artist; died Oct 25, 1993

1912 - ‘Slammin’ Sammy Snead (Samuel Jackson Snead)
golf: champ: Masters [1949, 1952, 1954; British Open [1946]; PGA [1942, 1949, 1951]; died May 23, 2002

1915 - Herman Wouk
writer: The Winds of War, Marjorie Morningstar

1917 - Yasuhiro Nakasone
Prime Minister of Japan [1982-1987]: “Politics can’t be changed by a dog howling in the distance. Politics means getting within a sword’s reach.”

1922 - Christopher (Frank Carandini) Lee
actor: Dracula, The Mummy, The Far Pavilions

1923 - Henry (Alfred) Kissinger
Nobel Peace Prize-winner [1973]; U.S. Secretary of State: Nixon Administration; political consultant: NBC News

1930 - John Barth
author: Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor, Letters

1932 - Zora Foley
boxer: KO’d by Cassius Clay at Madison Square Garden [March 22, 1967]

1935 - Ramsey Lewis
musician: group: Ramsey Lewis Trio: The In Crowd, Hang on Sloopy, Wade in the Water

1935 - Lee Ann Meriwether
Miss America [1955]; actress: Barnaby Jones, Batman

1936 - Lou Gossett Jr.
Academy Award-winning actor: An Officer and a Gentleman [1982]; Emmy Award winner: Roots-Part Two [1977]; Sadat, Enemy Mine, Iron Eagle series

1939 - Don Williams
country singer: I Believe in You; leader of Pozo- seco Singers; actor: Smokey and the Bandit II

1943 - Cilla Black (Priscilla Maria Veronica White)
singer: You’re My World

1943 - Bruce Weitz
actor: Hill Street Blues, Death of a Centerfold, The Liar’s Club, The O.J. Simpson Story, Molly and Gina

1948 - Gary (Lynn) Nolan
baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976/all-star: 1972], California Angels

1954 - Catherine Carr
Olympic Gold-medalist: U.S. swimmer: women’s 100-meter breaststroke, women’s 4-by-100 and 4-by-200 meter medley relays w/Melissa Belote, Deena Dearduff, Sandra Neilson [1972 Munich Olympics]

1957 - Siouxsie Sioux (Janet Susan Ballion)
singer: group: Siouxsie and the Banshees: Helter Skelter, Israel, Lord’s Prayer, Christine, Happy House

1961 - Cathy Silvers
actress: Happy Days; Phil Silvers’ daughter

1965 - Todd Bridges
actor: Diff’rent Strokes, Fish, Home Boys, Twice Dead.

Chart Toppers
May 27th.

1947 Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
My Adobe Hacienda - Eddy Howard
Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
What is Life Without Love - Eddy Arnold

1955 Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
Learnin’ the Blues - Frank Sinatra
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 If You Wanna Be Happy - Jimmy Soul
Surfin’ USA - The Beach Boys
Foolish Little Girl - The Shirelles
Lonesome 7-7203 - Hawkshaw Hawkins

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Brown Sugar - The Rolling Stones
Me and You and a Dog Named Boo - Lobo
I Won’t Mention It Again - Ray Price

1979 Reunited - Peaches & Herb
Hot Stuff - Donna Summer
Love You Inside Out - Bee Gees
If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body Would You Hold It Against Me -
Bellamy Brothers

1987 With or Without You - U2
The Lady in Red - Chris DeBurgh
You Keep Me Hangin’ On - Kim Wilde
Can’t Stop My Heart from Loving You - The O’Kanes


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-27-2007, 11:00 PM
148th day of 2007 - 217 remaining.

Monday, May 28, 2007
CHRYSLER DAY. :)

Walter P. Chrysler was a poor boy growing up in Kansas; but on this day in 1928 he worked out a deal that made automotive history and took him from rags to riches. He merged his Chrysler Corporation with Dodge Brothers, Inc.

The Dodge Motor Car Company had been purchased several years earlier from the widows of John and Horace Dodge, the two founders, by Clarence Dillon’s banking firm for $148 million.

The merger of Chrysler and Dodge, the largest automobile industry merger in history at the time, placed the newly consolidated firm third in production and sales, just behind General Motors and Ford Motor Company.

Twenty years later to the day, Chrysler Corporation granted its employees a 13 cents an hour wage increase, ending a 17-day strike. The increase was two-cents higher than the raise given to General Motors’ employees three days earlier. GM workers’ base pay was increased to $1.61 per hour and was tied to a cost-of-living formula. Chrysler workers received a flat $1.63 per hour with no ties. $1.61 or $1.63 per hour with or without cost-of-living ties was a lot of money in 1948.

Walter Chrysler had died eight years earlier. We’re pretty sure he would have been amazed at what it cost to make a car then ... and what Chryslers and other cars are selling for today. We are.

Events
May 28th.

1892 - Comedienne Marie Dressler made her New York City singing debut in the comic opera, The Robber of the Rhine.

1922 - Otto Krueger conducted the Detroit News Orchestra, the first known radio orchestra, which was heard on WWJ Radio in Detroit, MI. The Detroit News owned the radio station at the time.

1929 - Warner Brothers debuted the first all-color talking picture. The film debuted at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City. Ethel Waters, Joe E. Brown and Arthur Lake starred in On With the Show.

1931 - WOR radio in New York City premiered The Witch’s Tale. The program was broadcast on the Mutual Broadcasting System (of which WOR was the flagship station) where it aired until 1938.

1934 - The Dionne quintuplets were born near Callender, Ontario to Oliva and Elzire Dionne. They were the first quints (that’s five babies, for those who may have forgotten) to survive infancy. This increase in Canada’s population became known as Marie, Cecile, Yvonne, Emilie and Annette.

1941 - Frank Sinatra joined Tommy Dorsey’s orchestra in recording This Love of Mine for Victor Records.

1953 - The first 3-D (three-dimensional) cartoon premiered at the Paramount Theatre in Hollywood, California. The production, a Walt Disney creation/RKO picture, was titled, Melody.

1957 - National League club owners voted to allow the Brooklyn Dodgers to move to sunny Southern California and said that the New York Giants baseball team could move with the Horace Stoneham family to Northern California. The teams went on to establish themselves in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

1957 - The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) was established. This is the organization that brings us the Grammy Awards for all forms of musical entertainment each year.

1959 - Able and Baker were two monkeys who survived a trip into space from a launch at Cape Canaveral, FL.

1966 - Percy Sledge hit number one with his first -- and what turned out to be his biggest -- hit. When a Man Loves a Woman would stay at the top of the pop music charts for two weeks. It was the singer’s only hit to make the top ten and was a million seller.

1975 - The Doobie Brothers went gold with the album, Stampede. The group, formed in San Jose, CA, recorded 16 charted hits. Two made it to number one, becoming million-selling, gold record winners: Black Water [March, 1975] and What a Fool Believes [April, 1979].

1982 - The legendary train, Orient Express, made popular through Agatha Christie’s thrilling mystery novel, Murder on the Orient Express, was reborn. The 26-hour train trip resumed across the European continent after a long respite.

1985 - Gay Mullins, a retiree from Seattle, WA, founded Old Cola Drinkers of America. This was an effort to bring back the original Coca-Cola, instead of the New Coke that the Atlanta-based company had foisted on the American cola-drinking market. By July of 1985, with arms firmly twisted behind their backs, Coca-Cola Company executives relented and returned the old formula to colaholics and with a new name: Classic Coke.

1985 - Vanity Fair magazine, with a picture of President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy smooching on the cover, went on sale.

Birthdays
May 28th.

1779 - Thomas Moore
poet, lyricist: Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms, The Last Rose of Summer, Oft in the Stilly Night; died Feb 25, 1852

1888 - Jim Thorpe
Olympic gold medalist: decathlon, pentathlon, [Stockholm: 1912]; baseball: NY Giants, Boston Braves; football: All-American; president of what became the NFL; died Mar 28, 1953

1900 - Clarence ‘Taffy’ Abel
U.S. Hockey Hall of Famer: 1st American to carry the flag in opening Winter Olympics ceremonies; one of 1st U.S. born NHL players: NY Rangers; Chicago Black Hawks; died Aug 1, 1964

1908 - Ian Fleming
author: creator of Bond ... James Bond; died Aug 12, 1964

1925 - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
baritone opera singer

1926 - Marvin Panch
auto racer: Daytona 500 winner [1961]

1931 - Carroll Baker
actress: The Carpetbaggers, Giant, Baby Doll, Harlow, Kindergarten Cop

1936 - Betty Shabazz
civil rights leader; wife of Malcom X; died June 23, 1997

1938 - Jerry West
Basketball Hall of Famer: Olympic gold medalist [1960]; LA Lakers all-star guard: individual record for season free throws [840] and NBA playoff career free-throws [1,213]; Lakers coach & general manager

1944 - Rudolph Giuliani (Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III)
politician: Mayor of New York City

1944 - Gladys (Maria) Knight
singer: w/The Pips: Midnight Train to Georgia, If I Were Your Woman, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Neither One of Us, Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me, Every Beat of My Heart

1945 - John Fogerty
songwriter; singer: group: Creedence Clearwater: Proud Mary, Have You Ever Seen the Rain, Bad Moon Rising, Lookin’ Out My Back Door; group: The Blue Ridge Rangers: Jambalaya, Hearts of Stone, The Old Man Down the Road, Centerfield

1945 - Gary Stewart
country singer: She’s Acting Single [I’m Drinkin’ Doubles], Drinkin’ Thing, Out of Hand

1946 - Ted Snell
hockey: NHL: Pittsburgh Penguins, Kansas City Scouts, Detroit Red Wings

1947 - Sondra Locke
actress: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Bronco Billy, Every Which Way But Loose, The Gauntlet, The Outlaw Josey Wales, Willard, Sudden Impact; director: Ratboy, Impulse

1947 - Kevin O’Shea
hockey: NHL: Buffalo Sabres, St. Louis Blues

1948 - Bruce Taylor
College Football Hall of Famer: Boston Univ.

1949 - Shelley Hamlin
golf: Stanford University Hall of Famer; champion: Japan Classic [1975], Phar-Mor at Inverrary [1992], Shoprite LPGA Classic [record: -9, 204: 1993]; William and Mousie Powell Award [1992]; LPGA President [1980, 1981]

1950 - Errol Thompson
hockey: NHL: Toronto Maple Leafs, Detroit Red Wings, Pittsburgh Penguins

1952 - Terry Schmidt
football: Chicago Bears

1955 - Mark Howe
hockey: Olympic silver medalist [1972]; World Hockey Assoc. Rookie of the Year [1973]: Houston Aeros: played with brother Marty and Hockey Hall of Famer Dad, Gordie Howe; NHL: New England/Hartford Whalers, Philadelphia Flyers, Detroit Red Wings

1962 - Roland Gift
singer: group: Fine Young Cannibals: Johnny Come Home

1968 - Kylie Minogue
actress: Bio-Dome, Street Fighter, Moulin Rouge [2001]

Chart Toppers
May 28th.


1948 Nature Boy - Nat King Cole
Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
Baby Face - The Art Mooney Orchestra
Texarkana Baby - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Wayward Wind - Gogi Grant
The Happy Whistler - Don Robertson
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 My Guy - Mary Wells
Love Me Do - The Beatles
Chapel of Love - The Dixie Cups
My Heart Skips a Beat - Buck Owens

1972 Oh Girl - Chi-Lites
I’ll Take You There - The Staple Singers
Look What You Done for Me - Al Green
(Lost Her Love) On Our Last Date - Conway Twitty

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Funkytown - Lipps, Inc.
Don’t Fall in Love with a Dreamer - Kenny Rogers with Kim Carnes
Starting Over Again - Dolly Parton

1988 One More Try - George Michael
Shattered Dreams - Johnny Hates Jazz
Naughty Girls (Need Love Too) - Samantha Fox
Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses - Kathy Mattea


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-28-2007, 11:00 PM
149th day of 2007 - 216 remaining.

Tuesday, May 29, 2007
HOPE DAY. :)

England’s Leslie Townes Hope was born on this day in 1903, and he was probably smiling instead of crying when he entered the world. You see, Leslie, better known to us as Bob, kept the world smiling for seven decades.

In his autobiography, ‘Ski Nose’ gave us an insight into his sense of humor and comedic timing, “In Russia, I had no trouble with the language -- nobody talked.”

With a career that began with appearances in comedy short films in the 1930s, he made his first feature film appearance in The Big Broadcast of 1938 singing Thanks for the Memory, which became his theme song. Bob Hope hit it big, however, in 1940 with his first ‘road’ picture, The Road to Singapore. Co-starring with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour, he hit the road to Zanzibar, Morroco, Utopia, Rio, Bali (the first in color), and the last, Hong Kong in 1962.

The consummate entertainer, Bob Hope appeared in a multitude of films other than the roadies. Millions caught his act on nightclub stages, and on countless TV specials, including 17 years as host of The Academy Awards. Yet he was still best known for his USO tours and entertaining of troops overseas and on the front lines during World War II, the Korean War, the Viet Nam War and during Desert Storm in the early 1990s.

How could one human being have done so much, always seeming to have one more hour to give to entertain the world? Hope, who died July 27, 2003 at age 100, said it best in one of his quips, “If I could live my life over, I wouldn’t have time!”

Thank you for the memories, Mr. Hope, and for giving others hope.

Events
May 29th.


1790 - The smallest of the United States joined the first 12 states as number 13. Rhode Island, the Ocean State, probably got its name when discoverer Verrazano noted that, the area we know as Rhode Island, looked about the size of the tiny Greek Isle of Rhodes. Rhode Island’s capital city is Providence, and the tiny violet is appropriate as the state flower. Probably the most famous variety of chicken, the Rhode Island Red, is the state bird.

1827 - The first nautical school opened in Nantucket, MA. Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin’s Lancastrian School was the name. Learning to set sail was the game...

1844 - The first dark horse candidate was born at the Democratic Convention in Baltimore, Maryland. With the political rush of support for James K. Polk, after just seven ballots, Mr. Polk’s name appeared to break the deadlock. Polk won the nomination on the ninth ballot and, eventually, the U.S. Presidency.

1848 - The land of lakes and large expanses of green gave name to Wisconsin, the 30th state to enter the United States of America. (Wisconsin, is thought to be the Chippewa Indian word for "grassy place".) The wood violet is the state flower, the robin is the state bird and Madison is the capital city. All this is quite elementary. However, Wisconsin’s nickname is the Badger State, but it is not named after the little animal, as you might have thought. It seems that the many lead miners in the Wisconsin grass lands in the 1830s were called -- badgers.

1910 - An airplane raced a train -- and won! The race, from Albany, New York to New York City was worth a $10,000 prize for aviator Glenn Curtiss. It was sponsored by those promotion wizards at New York’s World newspaper.

1912 - Fifteen women were dismissed from their jobs at the Curtis Publishing Company in Philadelphia, PA -- for dancing the Turkey Trot while on the job!

1916 - The U.S. President’s flag was adopted by executive order.

1939 - When a Girl Marries was first heard on CBS. The serial continued for eighteen years on radio.

1942 - The biggest selling record of all time was recorded. A little out of season, perhaps, but White Christmas, the Irving Berlin classic, was recorded by Bing Crosby for Decca Records. The song was written for the film Holiday Inn. More than 30-million copies of Crosby’s most famous hit song have been sold and a total of nearly 70-million copies, including all versions of the standard, have been sold.

1943 - The Million Dollar Band was heard for the first time on NBC radio. Charlie Spivak was the first leader of the band that featured Barry Wood as vocalist. The unusual feature of the show was the awarding each week of five diamond rings!

1951 - Baseball pitcher Billy Joe Davidson of Marion, NC signed with the Cleveland Indians for a record bonus that was said to be $120,000.

1953 - Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, his Sherpa guide, became the first humans to reach the top of Mount Everest.

1961 - Ricky Nelson reached the top spot on the Billboard singles chart with Travelin’ Man. It was was Nelson’s second chart-topping hit. Poor Little Fool made it to the top in August of 1958.

1962 - Buck (John) O’Neil became the first black coach in major-league baseball. He accepted the job with the Chicago Cubs. O’Neil had previously been a scout with the Cubs organization.

1965 - Ralph Boston set a world record in the broad jump at 27-feet, 4-3/4 inches, at a meet held in Modesto, CA.

1970 - Mike Cuellar of Baltimore became one of just 11 major-league hurlers since 1900 to strike out four batters in one inning -- because the catcher dropped the third strike of the third out.

1972 - The Osmonds received a gold record for the album, Phase III.

1978 - The 13-cent postage stamp became the 15-cent postage stamp when new U.S. rates to mail letters went into effect.

1985 - The Philadelphia Phillies moved Golden Glove third baseman Mike Schmidt to first base. He was replaced at third base with rookie Rick Schu.

1985 - Death and hundreds of injuries resulted from a riot at a soccer match in Brussels, Belgium. The European Cup Final at Heysel stadium between Liverpool and Juventus of Turin was televised throughout Europe. Just before the match was to begin, soccer fans rioted killing 39 and injuring 400 or more. 26 British soccer fans identified from the video tapes were extradited to Belgium to stand trial. The riot prompted increased security at later British soccer games.

Birthdays
May 29th.

1630 - King Charles II
British monarch: King of England, Scotland, Ireland [1660-1685]; died Feb 6, 1685

1736 - Patrick Henry
American revolutionary patriot: “...give me liberty, or give me death!”; died June 6, 1799

1874 - Gilbert Keith Chesterton
author: created Father Brown crime-fiction series; The Man Who was Thursday, English Men of Letters; died June 14, 1936

1880 - Oswald Spengler
historical author: The Decline of the West; died May 8, 1936

1894 - Beatrice Lillie (Gladys Lillie)
actress: On Approval, Thoroughly Modern Millie; died Jan 20, 1989

1903 - Bob Hope (Leslie Townes Hope)
comedian, entertainer, actor; died July 27, 2003; see Hope Day [above]

1914 - (Walter) Stacy Keach Sr.
actor: The Parallax View, High Velocity, Fighting Back, Armed and Dangerous, The Rockford Files, Bonanza, Longstreet, Maverick; father of actors Stacy and James Keach; died Feb 13, 2003

1917 - John Fitzgerald Kennedy
35th U.S. President [1961-1963]; married to Jaqueline Bouvier [two sons, one daughter]; nickname: JFK, Jack; youngest, first Roman Catholic, first to win Purple Heart, first to serve in U.S. Navy, first to win Pulitzer Prize , fourth U.S. President to be assassinated, secondnd buried at Arlington National Cemetery; assassinated Nov 22, 1963

1921 - Clifton James
actor: Lone Star, The Bonfire of the Vanities, The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training, The Man with the Golden Gun, Live and Let Die, David and Lisa, Cool Hand Luke, Lewis & Clark, City of Angels

1922 - Joe Weatherly
NASCAR Hall of Famer: championship [1953]; Grand National Champion [1962, 63]; killed in crash at Riverside International Raceway Jan 19, 1964; The Joe Weatherly Museum at Darlington International Raceway is named for him

1923 - Eugene Wright
jazz musician: bass: led 16-piece band: Dukes of Swing; played w/Dave Brubeck, Gene Ammons, Count Basie, Arnett Cobb, Buddy DeFranco, Red Norvo

1932 - Richie Guerin
basketball: NY Knicks [in 8 years w/Knicks he scored 10,392 points and averaged 20.1 points; St. Louis Hawks; player/coach: St. Louis/Atlanta Hawks; lifetime stats: 14,676 points [17.3 ppg], 4,278 rebounds [5.1 rpg], 4,211 assists [5.0 apg] over 848 games [in 42 playoff contests he averaged 15.6 points, 3.5 rebounds, and 5.1 assists]; broadcaster: NY Knicks; Wall Street stockbroker

1932 - Paul Ehrlich
biologist, writer: The Population Bomb; helped form group: Zero Population Growth, advocating a limit of 2 children per family

1938 - Francis ‘Fay’ Vincent Jr.
baseball: commissioner

1939 - Al Unser Sr.
auto racer: Indy 500 winner [1970, 1971, 1978, 1987]) retired [1994]; younger brother of Bobby and father of Al Jr. [first father/son to race each other at Indy [1983]

1941 - Roy Crewsdon
musician: guitar: group: Freddie and The Dreamers: I’m Telling You Now, Do the Freddie

1942 - Kevin Conway
actor: Prince Brat and the Whipping Boy, The Quick and the Dead, Gettysburg, One Good Cop, Home Boy, Rage of Angels, Paradise Alley, Johnny We Hardly Knew Ye, Other People’s Money, Of Mice and Men, When You Comin’ Back - Red Ryder?

1942 - Larry Mavety
hockey: Port-Huron Flags, LA Sharks, Chicago Cougars, Indianapolis Racers; Coach/GM: Kingston Frontenacs

1944 - Helmut Berger
actor: The Damned, Dorian Gray, The Godfather, Part 3

1945 - Gary Brooker
musician: keyboards, singer: solo: Say It Ain’t So Joe, Switchboard Susan, LPs: No More Fear of Flying, Lead Me to the Water, Echoes in the Night; groups: Procol Harum: Whiter Shade of Pale; The Paramounts

1947 - Anthony Geary
actor: General Hospital, High Desert Kill, Scorchers, Night of the Warrior, Crack House, UHF

1950 - Rebbie (Maureen Reilette) Jackson
singer: LPs: Centipede [written by brother, Michael], Reactions; oldest member of the Jackson family

1952 - Fred (Fredrick William) Holdsworth
baseball: pitcher: Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, Montreal Expos, Milwaukee Brewers

1953 - Mike (Michael Dennis) Dupree
baseball: pitcher: SD Padres

1953 - Danny Elfman
singer: group: Oingo Boingo; composer: soundtracks: Batman, Beetlejuice, The Simpsons; film composer: Mission: Impossible, Mars Attacks!, Men in Black, Good Will Hunting, Scream 2

1956 - Larry Blackmon
musician: drums, singer: group: Cameo: Word Up!

1956 - LaToya (Yvonne) Jackson
singer: The Jacksons; solo: Playboy photo spread

1958 - Annette Bening
actress: Richard III, The American President, Love Affair, Bugsy, Postcards from the Edge, The Grifters, Valmont, The Great Outdoors, Mars Attacks!, American Beauty

1961 - Melissa Etheridge
Grammy Award-winning singer: Come to My Window [1994], Ain’t It Heavy [1992]

1963 - Lisa Whelchel
actress: The Facts of Life, Where the Red Fern Grows: Part 2, Twirl, The Double McGuffin.

Chart Toppers
May 29th.

1949 Riders in the Sky - Vaughn Monroe
Again - Doris Day
Some Enchanted Evening - Perry Como
Lovesick Blues - Hank Williams

1957 All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
Love Letters in the Sand - Pat Boone
A White Sport Coat (And a Pink Carnation) - Marty Robbins
Four Walls - Jim Reeves

1965 Help Me, Rhonda - The Beach Boys
Back in My Arms Again - The Supremes
Wooly Bully - Sam The Sham and The Pharoahs
Girl on the Billboard - Del Reeves

1973 Frankenstein - The Edgar Winter Group
My Love - Paul McCartney & Wings
Daniel - Elton John
Satin Sheets - Jeanne Pruett

1981 Bette Davis Eyes - Kim Carnes
Being with You - Smokey Robinson
Stars on 45 medley - Stars on 45
Seven Year Ache - Rosanne Cash

1989 Forever Your Girl - Paula Abdul
Rock On - Michael Damian
Soldier of Love - Donny Osmond
After All This Time - Rodney Crowell


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

[B]All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-29-2007, 11:00 PM
150th day of 2007 - 215 remaining.

Wednesday, May 30, 2007
SEATED LINCOLN DAY. :)

Daniel Chester French created the famous sculpture of Abraham Lincoln, titled Seated Lincoln. Lincoln is in meditation, seated in a large armchair. Both French and the Piccirilli brothers completed the sculpture. On this day in 1922 the memorial in which the statue is permanently seated was dedicated, although the cornerstone was laid in 1915.

The Lincoln Memorial, with Doric columns on the exterior and Ionic columns on the interior, was designed by architect Henry Bacon. Marble was brought from Colorado and Tennessee, and limestone from Indiana to complete the stately memorial to one of the United States’ most revered presidents. Bronze ceiling beams picture murals and ornamentation created by Jules Guerin. An engraved stone tablet in the south chamber bears Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address; his second inaugural speech, also engraved on a stone tablet, is in the north chamber.

The Lincoln Memorial stands opposite the Washington Monument, in Washington, D.C.’s West Potomac Park on 109.63 acres of land. Today, it also stands prominently among new memorials, the World War II Memorial, and one to honor another president, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

We wonder if Lincoln would sit down in front of all the falderal going on in Washington today.

Events
May 30th.

1783 - The Pennsylvania Evening Post, first published by Benjamin Towne in Philadelphia, PA this day, was the first daily paper in the U.S.

1848 - W.G. Young of Baltimore, MD patented the ice-cream freezer -- just in time for spring and summer treats! Nice timing, Mr. Young!

1868 - Memorial Day was observed for the first time in the United States -- at the request of General John A. Logan, the national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. It was first called Decoration Day because the General had seen women decorating graves of Civil War heroes.

1879 - William Vanderbilt renamed Gilmore’s Garden to Madison Square Garden. There have been five different venues named Madison Square Garden since -- all in New York City.

1896 - The first documented auto accident occurred -- in New York City. A Duryea Motor Wagon, driven by Henry Wells from Springfield, MA collided with a bicycle ridden by Evylyn Thomas of NYC.

1911 - Ray Harroun won the first 500-mile auto race at the Brickyard, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Harroun won the race with an average speed of 74.59 MPH. It took him six hours and 42 minutes to complete the race. He won $14,000 for his effort.

1922 - Max Flack and Clifton Heathcote became the first major-league baseball players to play on two teams in the same day! Here’s how it went down: Between games of a doubleheader, the Chicago Cubs and the St. Louis Cardinals made the switcheroo, with Flack putting on a Cubs uniform and Heathcote trading his Cubs uniform for that of the Cardinals. The outfielders both played in the nightcap of the twin-bill.

1922 - ‘Smilin’ Ed McConnell debuted on radio, smiling and playing his banjo. McConnell quickly became a legend in the medium.

1933 - Sally Rand made a name for herself as she introduced her exotic and erotic fan dance to audiences at Chicago’s Century of Progress Exposition. Twisting and turning behind two huge fans, one might wonder just how exciting the fan dance could possibly be. It is important to realize that Ms. Rand was, um, naked during the performance.

1935 - America’s Town Meeting was heard on radio for the first time. The NBC program continued for 21 years, with a name change to America’s Town Meeting of the Air.

1937 - Carl Hubbell pitched his 24th consecutive baseball victory in a two-year period. ‘King Carl’ (he was also called ‘The Mealticket’) went 26-6 for the 1936 season and 22-8 in 1937. The New York Giants hurler went one-for-two in the World Series both of those years.

1938 - Joyce Jordan, Girl Intern was first heard interning on CBS radio. The serial later evolved into The Brighter Day (1948).

1962 - The King of Swing, Benny Goodman, turned 53 and led the first American jazz band to play in the Soviet Union. Goodman and his band played six concerts in the U.S.S.R.

1967 - Daredevil Evel Knievel jumped 16 automobiles in a row in a motorcycle stunt at Ascot Speedway in Gardena, CA.

1975 - Alice Cooper received a gold record for the romantic album, Welcome to My Nightmare. Alice’s real name was Vincent Furnier. He changed his name to Alice Cooper in 1966 and was known primarily for his bizarre stage antics. He appeared in the film Prince of Darkness in 1987 and had 11 hits on the pop/rock charts in the 1970s and 1980s, including a pair of million-selling singles: I Never Cry and Poison. Romantic, indeed...

1985 - ABC-TV announced that every game of the Octoberfest known as the World Series would be played under the lights for the biggest baseball audience possible.

Birthdays
May 30th.


1672 - Peter the Great (Piotr Alekseevich Romanov)
Peter I: Russian Czar [1682-1721], Emperor of Russia [1721-1725]; died Jan 28, 1725; note: these dates are based on the Julian calendar -- see June 9 for Gregorian calendar dates

1896 - Howard Hawks
producer, director: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Monkey Business, Hatari, Rio Bravo, Rio Lobo, Sergeant York, A Song is Born, The Thing; died Dec 26, 1977

1901 - Cornelia Otis Skinner
author: Our Hearts were Young and Gay; died July 9, 1979

1902 - Stepin Fetchit (Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry)
actor: Amazing Grace, The Sun Shines Bright, Miracle in Harlem, Judge Priest; died Nov 19, 1985

1908 - Mel Blanc
‘the man of a thousand voices’: cartoon voice: Barney Rubble, Dino the Dinosaur, Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, Daffy Duck, Yosemite Sam, Quick Draw McGraw; actor: Jack Benny Show [radio]; died July 10, 1989

1909 - Benny Goodman
clarinetist, bandleader: Jersey Bounce, Taking a Chance on Love, Let’s Dance, Sing, Sing, Sing, Stompin’ at the Savoy, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, St. Louis Blues, Goodnight My Love, One O’Clock Jump, Perfidia; died June 13, 1986

1912 - Joseph Stein
playwright: Fiddler on the Roof, Enter Laughing, Mrs. Gibbons’ Boys; producer: Enter Laughing

1913 - Pee Wee (George) Erwin
musician: trumpet: Tommy Dorsey Band, Isham Jones Band; died June 20, 1981

1915 - Frank Blair
newscaster: The Today Show; moderator: Georgetown University Forum; host: Heritage; died Mar 14, 1995

1920 - George London
baritone singer: group: Bel canto Trio [w/Frances Yeend and Mario Lanza]; member: Vienna State Opera, Metropolitan Opera; Artistic Dir: Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; Director: National Opera Institute; head: Washington Opera; established George London Foundation for Singers [1971]; died in 1977

1920 - Franklin Schaffner
Academy Award-winning director: Patton [1970]; The Boys from Brazil, Papillon, Planet of the Apes, The Stripper, Islands in the Stream, Lionheart; died July 2, 1989

1927 - Clint Walker
actor: Cheyenne, The Ten Commandments, Yellowstone Kelly, The Dirty Dozen, None But the Brave, Cheyenne

1936 - Keir Dullea
actor: 2001: A Space Odyssey, Oh, What a Night, Blind Date, The Hostage Tower, Paperback Hero

1939 - Michael J. Pollard
actor: Bonnie and Clyde, Leo & Liz in Beverly Hills, Dick Tracy, American Gothic, The Arrival, Roxanne, Tango and Cash, Skeeter

1942 - Jack Stanfield
hockey: CHPL: St. Louis Braves, Dallas Black Hawks; WHL: Los Angeles Blades, San Diego Gulls, Houston Aeros

1943 - Gayle Sayers
College & Pro Football Hall of Famer: Chicago Bears: NFL Rookie of the Year [1965]; NFL Individual game record for touchdowns scored [6]

1944 - Lenny Davidson
musician: group: The Dave Clark Five: Do You Love Me, Glad All Over, Bits and Pieces, Everybody Knows, Red Balloon, Good Old Rock & Roll, Everybody Get Together; film: Catch Us if You Can

1945 - Meredith MacRae
actress: Petticoat Junction, My Three Sons, Bikini Beach, Sketches of a Strangler, Vultures; daughter of Gordon and Sheila MacRae; died July 14, 2000

1946 - Mike (Michael George) Sadek
baseball: catcher: SF Giants

1947 - Jocelyn Bourassa
golf champion: DuMaurier Classic [1973]

1949 - Lydell Mitchell
football: Penn State Univ. [single-season rushing record: 1,567 yards in 1971]; NFL: Baltimore Colts, SD Chargers, LA Rams

1951 - Stephen Tobolowsky
actor: Murder in the First, Radioland Murders, Groundhog Day, Sneakers, Basic Instinct, Thelma and Louise, Bird on a Wire, Mississippi Burning, Spaceballs, Keep My Grave Open, The Grifters, A Whole New Ballgame, Against the Grain

1955 - (Nicky) Topper Headon
musician: drums: group: The Clash: White Man, English Civil War, Stay Free, I Fought the Law, Brand New Cadillac, London Calling, Death or Glory, Jimmy Jazz; songwriter: Rock the Casbah

1958 - Marie Fredriksson
singer: duo: Roxette: The Look, Dressed for Success, Listen to Your Heart , Dangerous, It Must Have Been Love, Joyride, Fading Like A Flower [Every Time You Leave], Almost Unreal, Wish I Could Fly

1964 - Wynonna Judd (Christina Claire Ciminella)
Grammy Award-winning singer: with her mother, Naomi: The Judds: Mama He’s Crazy [1984], Why Not Me [1985], Grandpa [Tell Me ’Bout the Good Old Days] [1986], Give a Little Love [1988], Love Can Build a Bridge [1991]; solo: She is His Only Need, I Saw the Light, No One Else on Earth, A Bad Goodbye [w/Clint Black], Only Love; sister of singer, actress Ashley Judd

1981 - Blake Bashoff
actor: Bushwacked, Big Bully, The New Swiss Family Robinson, Deuces Wild.

Chart Toppers
May 30th.

1950 My Foolish Heart - The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra (vocal: Eileen Wilson)
Bewitched - The Bill Snyder Orchestra
It Isn’t Fair - The Sammy Kaye Orchestra (vocal: Don Cornell)
Birmingham Bounce - Red Foley

1958 All I Have to Do is Dream - The Everly Brothers
Return to Me - Dean Martin
Do You Want to Dance - Bobby Freeman
Just Married - Marty Robbins

1966 When a Man Loves a Woman - Percy Sledge
A Groovy Kind of Love - The Mindbenders
Paint It, Black - The Rolling Stones
Distant Drums - Jim Reeves

1974 The Streak - Ray Stevens
Dancing Machine - The Jackson 5
The Show Must Go On - Three Dog Night
No Charge - Melba Montgomery

1982 Ebony and Ivory - Paul McCartney with Stevie Wonder
Don’t Talk to Strangers - Rick Springfield
I’ve Never Been to Me - Charlene
Just to Satisfy You - Waylon & Willie

1990 Vogue - Madonna
All I Wanna Do is Make Love to You - Heart
Hold On - Wilson Phillips
Walkin’ Away - Clint Black


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-30-2007, 11:00 PM
151st day of 2007 - 214 remaining.

Thursday, May 31, 2007
MAKE MY DAY DAY. :D :D

Men relate to him, women’s hearts skip a beat. He’s the strong, silent type. He’s Clint Eastwood (Jr.), born, probably complete with leathered face, on this day in San Francisco in 1930.

Critics panned the 6'4" tall actor. Most thought he couldn’t deliver a line. He would have agreed with them back in 1954 when he took his first screen test. But instead, he ended up laughing all the way to the bank.

As movies changed, Clint matured with them. He learned his art and became an accomplished, Academy Award-winning director and producer (Unforgiven in 1992). Eastwood actually made his directing debut with the 1971 film, Play Misty for Me. His work ethic, developed when he was just a young boy, helped him finish the movie on time and in budget; a habit he continued as director of High Plains Drifter, The Eiger Sanction, The Outlaw Josey Wales and Bronco Billy among others.

Whether actor, director, producer (made his producer debut in the 1982 film, Firefox), stunt man (does his own stunts), or politician (was the mayor of Carmel, California), Clint Eastwood, as Vincent Canby wrote in The New York Times, “...absorbed the years and turned them into guts and grit.” Canby was writing about Eastwood’s performance in Heartbreak Ridge, but it could have been a comment on his life’s work.

Whether you picture him as the young cattle driver, Rowdy, in the seven-year-long television series, Rawhide; the silent, man with no name in Sergio Leone’s spaghetti westerns (A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly); the fatally attractive DJ in Play Misty for Me; the death-defying rock-hard cop, Dirty Harry; or the sexy, mature photographer who stole the heart of an Iowa farm-wife in The Bridges of Madison County, Clint Eastwood has somewhere, sometime, made your day.

Events
May 31st.


1859 - What was the sport of baseball originally called? This is not a trick question. On this day in 1859 the Philadelphia Athletics were formally organized to play the game of Town Ball. Baseball didn’t come into being until almost 20 years later.

1870 - As we get ready for the lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer (a great Nat King Cole tune...) we also add ‘sticky’. Edward J. de Smedt of New York City patented the stuff that sticks to car tires and shoes when it gets sticky under the hot sun beginning at this time of year. Mr. DeSemdt came up with the idea of the asphalt pavement, you see.

1880 - The League of American Wheelmen was formed in Newport, RI. It was the first national bicycle society to be organized in the United States.

1889 - 2,300 people died and thousands lost their homes on this unfortunate day in Johnstown, PA. Heavy rains throughout the month caused the Connemaugh River Dam to break, flooding Johnstown. Some 800 unidentified victims were buried in a common grave. The flood was such a tragedy that the phrase, “Johnstown Flood,” became synonymous with a disaster.

1929 - The first reindeer to be born in the United States were born on this day in North Beverly, MA. And you thought reindeer were only born at the North Pole...

1930 - Golfing great Bobby Jones captured the first leg of the golfing grand slam by winning the British Amateur golf title.

1937 - The first quadruplets to complete college courses of study were awarded Bachelor of Arts degrees, individually. Mary, Mona, Roberta and Leota Keys received their degrees from Baylor University in Waco, TX.

1938 - Henry Armstrong defeated Barney Ross in New York City to win the welterweight boxing title.

1941 - The very first issue of Parade: The Weekly Picture Newspaper went on sale. Some 125,000 copies were sold for a nickel each. Parade became the most-read publication in the U.S. with a circulation of over 22-million readers in 132 newspapers.

1943 - A comic strip came to radio, as Archie Andrews was heard on the Mutual Broadcasting System for the first time. Archie, Veronica and the gang stayed on radio for about five years.

1949 - A crowd of 35,000 people paid tribute to radio personality Mary Margaret McBride at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, (one of the five boroughs that make up New York City). McBride was celebrating her 15th year in radio.

1964 - The longest major-league baseball doubleheader (to the time) ended in 19 hours, 16 minutes. The New York Mets and the San Francisco Giants battled it out at Shea Stadium in New York. The first game of the doubleheader set a major-league mark for the longest game (by time) as the Giants beat the Mets 8-6. The game lasted 23 innings and was played in 7 hours and 23 minutes.

1969 - Stevie Wonder’s My Cherie Amour was released by Tamla Records. The song made it to number four on the pop music charts on July 26 and stayed on the nation’s radios for eleven weeks. Trivia: My Cherie Amour was not the original title of the song. Wonder had named the song, Oh My Marcia, for a former girlfriend. Of course, singing it back with the original tune, one could see that Oh My Marcia doesn’t quite fit as well as My Cherie Amour. This is Casey in Hollywood. Now back to the countdown...

1974 - William DeVaughn, a soul singer, songwriter and guitarist from Washington, DC, received a gold record for his only hit, Be Thankful for What You Got. The tune made it to number four on the pop music charts (6/29/74). Ever hear the phrase, “Don’t give up the day job?” This was quite applicable to DeVaughn, who was never heard musically again. His day job was working for the federal government.

1976 - Ear doctors didn’t have to drum up business this day. There were plenty of walk-ins as The Who put out a total of 76,000 watts of power at 120 decibels. They played the loudest concert anyone had ever heard, making it into The Guinness Book of World Records.

1984 - Lightweight boxing champion Ray ‘Boom Boom’ Mancini boomed no more. He was defeated in the 14th round of a scheduled 15-round World Boxing Association title fight in Buffalo, NY. Livingstone Bramble is the boxer who did the deed. Never heard from him, again, either...

1990 - A little summer replacement TV show named Seinfeld debuted. It ran only through July, but the ‘show about nothing’ returned in January 1991 to become a full-blown smash, running through May 14, 1998. The sitcom’s original cast, Jason Alexander as George, Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Elaine, Michael Richards as (Cosmo) Kramer and, of course, Jerry Seinfeld as himself, became part of Americana, with millions of viewers discussing the show at work, and quoting the funny lines. Seinfeld stills lives in rerun form, with classics such as: The Contest (about “you know”), The Pick (Elaine and her revealing Christmas card), The Junior Mint (Jerry and the woman whose name rhymes with a female body part & Kramer’s operating-room accident), The Puffy Shirt, The Soup Nazi and the trip to India, where the show’s sequence runs backwards (The Betrayal), yadda yadda yadda. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Birthdays
May 31st.


1819 - Walt Whitman
poet: Leaves of Grass, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d, Passage to India, O Captain! My Captain!; died Mar 26, 1892

1857 - Pope Pius XI (Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti)
259th pope of the Roman Catholic Church [1922-1939]; died Feb 10, 1939

1894 - Fred Allen (John Florence Sullivan)
comedian: radio star: Allen’s Alley, The Fred Allen Show, The Linit Bath Club Revue; died Mar 17, 1956

1898 - Dr. Norman Vincent Peale
clergyman: radio ministry; author and syndicated newspaper column: The Power of Positive Thinking; died Dec 24, 1993

1908 - Don Ameche (Dominic Felix Amici)
Academy Award-winning actor: Cocoon [1985]; Trading Places, Corinna Corinna; inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame [1992]; died Dec 6, 1993

1912 - Henry ‘Scoop’ Jackson
U.S. Senator from Washington; died Sep 1, 1983

1920 - Edward Bennett Williams
attorney; owner: Baltimore Orioles; died Aug 13, 1988

1922 - Denholm Elliott
actor: A Room with a View, The Bourne Identity, The Boys from Brazil, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Voyage of the Damned, Trading Places, Scorchers; died Oct 6, 1992

1923 - Ellsworth Kelly
American hard-edge [Abstract Geometric] painter: Seine, Green Red Yellow Blue, Blue Yellow Red III, Orange Red Relief

1923 - Prince Rainer III
head of state: Monaco; married American film star, Grace Kelly; died Apr 6, 2005

1930 - Clint Eastwood
actor: see Make My Day Day [above]

1933 - Shirley Verrett
opera singer: soprano: New York Met

1935 - Ronald Laird
National Track & Field Hall of Famer: race walker: Pan-American Games gold medalist [1967]

1938 - Peter Yarrow
singer: group: Peter, Paul and Mary: Leaving on a Jet Plane, Puff the Magic Dragon, If I Had a Hammer, Blowin’ in the Wind, I Dig Rock ’n’ Roll Music; songwriter: Torn Between Two Lovers

1939 - Terry Waite
envoy; hostage: Lebanon [1987-1991]

1940 - Augie Meyers
musician: keyboards: groups: Sir Douglas Quintet: She’s About a Mover; Texas Tornados: It was Fun While It Lasted; operates his studio north of San Antonio TX

1941 - Johnny Paycheck (Donald Eugene Lytle)
country singer: Take This Job and Shove It, The Lovin’ Machine, [Don’t Take Her] She’s All I Got, Someone to Give My Love To, Mr. Lovemaker, Song and Dance Man, For a Minute There, Slide Off Your Satin Sheets, Friend, Lover, Wife, Heartbreak Tennessee, Motel Time Again, Jukebox Charlie, The Cave; songwriter: Apartment No. 9, Touch My Heart; died Feb 18, 2003

1942 - ‘Happy’ (Harold) Hairston
basketball: Sacramento Kings, LA Lakers; died May 1, 2001

1943 - Sharon Gless
Emmy Award-winning actress: Cagney & Lacey [1985-1986, 1986-1987]; Revenge of the Stepford Wives, Tales of the Unexpected

1943 - Joe Namath
‘Broadway Joe’: Pro Football Hall of Famer: quarterback: New York Jets: AFL’s Rookie of the Year [1965], Player of the Year [1968], Super Bowl III MVP; pantyhose and ointment spokesperson

1945 - Rainer Werner Fassbinder
director: Chinese Roulette, Querelle, Veronika Voss, Berlin Alexanderplatz, Beware of a Holy Whore; died June 10, 1982

1948 - John ‘Bonzo’ Bonham
musician: drums: group: Led Zeppelin: Whole Lotta Love, Stairway to Heaven, Immigrant Song; died Sep 25, 1980

1949 - Tom Berenger (Thomas Michael Moore)
actor: One Life to Live, If Tomorrow Comes, Platoon, Sliver, The Big Chill, Eddie and the Cruisers, Gettysburg, Looking for Mr. Goodbar, A Murder of Crows, In the Company of Spies, Turbulence II: Fear of Flying

1950 - Gregory Harrison
actor: Logan’s Run, Trapper John, M.D., Family Man, Cadillac Girls, Caught in the Act

1952 - Jean Lemieux
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Washington Capitals

1955 - Laura Baugh
golf: U.S. Women’s Amateur champ [1971]

1961 - Lea Thompson
actress: The Right to Remain Silent, Dennis the Menace, The Beverly Hillbillies, Howard the Duck, Back to the Future series, Jaws 3, All the Right Moves, Caroline in the City

1965 - Brooke Shields
model: Ivory Snow baby; actress: The Blue Lagoon, Pretty Baby, Brenda Starr, The Seventh Floor, Backstreet Dreams, Stalking Laura, Suddenly Susan

1967 - Kenny Lofton
baseball: Houston Astros [AL rookie-season record: most stolen bases [66: 1992], Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians [record: most stolen bases]

Chart Toppers
May 31st.

1951 On Top of Old Smokey - The Weavers (vocal: Terry Gilkyson)
Too Young - Nat King Cole
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
I Want to Be with You Always - Lefty Frizzell

1959 Kansas City - Wilbert Harrison
Dream Lover - Bobby Darin
Personality - Lloyd Price
The Battle of New Orleans - Johnny Horton

1967 Groovin’ - The Young Rascals
Respect - Aretha Franklin
I Got Rhythm - The Happenings
Sam’s Place - Buck Owens

1975 Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Freddy Fender
How Long - Ace
Sister Golden Hair - America
Thank God I’m a Country Boy - John Denver

1983 Flashdance...What a Feeling - Irene Cara
Overkill - Men At Work
Time (Clock of the Heart) - Culture Club
You Take Me for Granted - Merle Haggard

1991 I Don’t Wanna Cry - Mariah Carey
More Than Words - Extreme
I Wanna Sex You Up - Color Me Badd
In a Different Light - Doug Stone


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
05-31-2007, 11:00 PM
152nd day of 2007 - 213 remaining.

Friday, June 1, 2007
SUPERMAN DAY. :)

The first issue of Action Comics was published on this day in 1938. In its pages was the world’s first super hero, Superman.

Jerry Siegel had a dream about the baby, Moses, who was abandoned by his parents in order that his life be saved. This dream prompted Siegel’s creation of the ‘Man of Steel’. Artist Joe Shuster made the comic book hero come alive. The first story, in this first issue, took place on the planet, Krypton, where baby Kal-El was born. The infant was shot to Earth in a rocket just before Krypton exploded.

We all know the rest of the story: the baby landed in Smalltown, U.S.A., was adopted by the Kent family and named, Clark. On Earth, Clark Kent had superhuman powers, “faster than a speeding bullet ... more powerful than a locomotive ... able to leap tall buildings at a single bound.” The only thing that could render him powerless was kryptonite, a green rock from the planet Krypton. Disguised as a timid, bespectacled reporter for Metropolis’ Daily Planet (with coworkers Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and boss Perry White), Superman was determined to fight the “never-ending battle for truth, justice and the American way.”

Superman was born in a comic strip in 1938; but he continues to live in TV reruns, films starring Christopher Reeve and in the recent TV series, Lois and Clark.

Events
June 1st.


1638 - An earthquake was reported in the unlikely locale of Plymouth, MA.

1792 - Kentucky entered the United States of America as the 15th state. Since its name is an American Indian word for "great meadow", it is fitting that Kentucky’s nickname is the Bluegrass State, and its flower is the goldenrod. The official state bird is the cardinal. The capital of Kentucky is the city of Frankfort.

1796 - Tennessee joined the United States of America on this day. Long before it officially became the 16th state, Tennessee had already begun to earn its nickname, the Volunteer State, as it sent large numbers of volunteers to fight in the American Revolution. The tradition continued for the War of 1812, the Mexican War and the Civil War. The country-music capital of the world, Nashville, is also the governmental capital of Tennessee. The state’s official flower is the iris, its bird, the mockingbird.

1831 - Sir James Clark Ross, an English navigator and explorer, discovered the magnetic North Pole while on his Arctic exploration.

1869 - Thomas Edison of Boston, MA received a patent for his electric voting machine. Ol’ Tom would soon have a filing cabinet full of patents.

1911 - The folks in Bradford and Leeds in Great Britain didn’t need wheelbarrows to get around ... they were the first in England to have trolleys. The trolleys started running on this day.

1925 - Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees played the first of what would become 2,130 consecutive baseball games (Gehrig played in every Yankee game until May 2, 1939), setting a major-league record not to be broken until Cal Ripken, Jr. of Baltimore did so in the summer of 1995. Gehrig wasn’t even a starter on this day. He was inserted in the lineup for Wally Pipp.

1936 - The Lux Radio Theater moved from New York City to Hollywood. Cecil B. DeMille, the program’s host on the NBC Blue network, introduced Clark Gable and Marlene Dietrich in The Legionnaire and the Lady.

1949 - Microfilm copies of Newsweek magazine were offered to subscribers for the first time. The weekly publication cost $15 a year.

1953 - The Mask of Medusa, on ABC-TV’s Twilight Theater, featured the network-TV acting debut of Raymond Burr. He later became the star of Perry Mason and Ironside.

1957 - The first American to break the four-minute mile was Don Bowden, who was timed at 3 minutes, 58.7 seconds.

1959 - Celebrating a solid year at the top of the album charts was Johnny’s Greatest Hits on Columbia Records. The LP stayed for several more years at or near the top of the album charts. It became the all-time album leader at 490 weeks.

1961 - There was a new sound in the air this day. FM multiplex stereo broadcasting was enjoyed for the first time by listeners to FM radio in Schenectady, NY, Los Angeles and Chicago. The FCC adopted the standard a year later.

1967 - The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was released. One of the first critically-acclaimed rock albums, Sgt. Pepper’s became the number one album in the world and was at the top of the U.S. album list for 15 weeks. (See June 2 TWtD for more on Sgt. Pepper’s.)

1975 - Nolan Ryan of the California Angels tied the no-hit record in major-league baseball. Ryan tossed his fourth career no-hitter with a 1-0 win over the Baltimore Orioles. The future Hall of Famer told reporters, “Gee, and to think I did this exactly five years after Al Kaline swallowed his tongue in the outfield in Detroit. Skeiciw adkehhf gdvrb ewix ke. I love this game!”

1985 - According to a study released on this day, Southerners (those from the southern U.S.) did more hugging than their counterparts from up north. It was also reported that women were more willing than men to hug.

1987 - Knuckleballer Phil Niekro won game number 314 by leading the Cleveland Indians to a 9-6 win over the Detroit Tigers. The victory also brought Phil and his brother, Joe, to a total of 531 career wins, breaking the record set by the Perry brothers.

Birthdays
June 1st.

1796 - Sadi Nicolas Léonard Carnot
physicist: pioneer in thermodynamics: discovered the 2nd law of thermodynamics; died Aug 24, 1832

1801 - Brigham Young
Mormon church leader: led thousands across the wilderness to settle in over 300 U.S. western towns; survived by 17 wives and 47 children; died Aug 28, 1877

1878 - John Masefield
poet: Sea Fever, A Wanderer’s Song, Cargoes, The Wanderer, A Consecration, To-Morrow, Spanish Waters, Christmas Eve At Sea; died May 12, 1967

1890 - Frank Morgan (Francis Wuppermann)
actor: The Wizard of Oz, The Stratton Story, The Three Musketeers, Tortilla Flat, The White Cliffs of Dover, Naughty Marietta, The Great Ziegfeld, Key to the City; died Sep 18, 1949

1898 - Molly Picon (Pyekoon)
actress: Fiddler on the Roof, Come Blow Your Horn, For Pete’s Sake, Murder on Flight 502, Cannonball Run; star of the Yiddish stage; died Apr 6, 1992

1921 - Nelson Riddle
Grammy Award-winning orchestra leader: Cross Country Suite; Lisbon Antigua; arranger: for Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole; died Oct 6, 1985

1922 - (Beatrice) Joan Caulfield
actress: Pony Express Rider, Daring Dobermans, Welcome Stranger, Blue Skies, The Lady Says No; died June 18, 1991

1925 - Richard Erdman
actor: Tomboy, Stalag 17, Namu, the Killer Whale, Cry Danger; director: Brothers O’Toole

1926 - Darel Dieringer
auto racer: champ: NASCAR California 500 [1963], Southern 500 [1966]

1926 - Andy Griffith
actor: The Andy Griffith Show, Matlock, A Face in the Crowd, No Time for Sergeants, From Here to Eternity; comedian: comedy record: Make Yourself Comfortable

1926 - Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jean Baker Mortenson)
actress: Gentleman Prefer Blondes, The Seven-Year Itch, Some Like It Hot, Bus Stop, The Asphalt Jungle, Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend, The Misfits, Scudda-Hoo!Scudda-Hay!; famous centerfold: Playboy [1952]; died Aug 5, 1962

1930 - Pat Corley
actor: Bay City Blues, Murphy Brown, Of Mice and Men, Silent Witness

1930 - Edward Woodward
actor: The Equalizer, Code Name Kyril, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Champions, The Final Option, The Appointment, The Wicker Man, ‘Breaker’ Morant

1933 - Alan Ameche
football: Wisconsin: Heisman Trophy winner [1954]

1934 - Pat Boone (Charles Eugene Boone)
singer: Love Letters in the Sand, April Love, Moody River, Ain’t That a Shame, I Almost Lost My Mind, Friendly Persuasion, Don’t Forbid Me, gospel LPs; actor: State Fair, Journey to the Center of the Earth; host: The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom; descendant: frontiersman, Daniel Boone; married to Red Foley’s daughter, Shirley

1934 - Peter Masterson (Carlos Bee Masterson)
actor: The Exorcist; director: Arctic Blue, Night Game, Full Moon in Blue Water, Blood Red, The Trip to Bountiful; father of actress Mary Stuart Masterson

1937 - Morgan Freeman
actor: Driving Miss Daisy, Glory, Unforgiven, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Queen, Another World, Outbreak, Amistad, Deep Impact; director: Bopha

1939 - Cleavon (Jake) Little
Tony Award-winning actor: Purlie [1970]; Emmy Award: Dear John [1988-1989]; Blazing Saddles, Vanishing Point, Fletch Lives, Perfect Harmony, Separate But Equal, Murder by Numbers; died Oct 22, 1992

1940 - Rene Auberjonois
Tony Award-winning actor: Coco [1970]; The Ballad of Little Jo, Gore Vidal’s Billy the Kid, Police Academy 5, Pete ’n’ Tillie, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, Brewster McCloud, Petulia, Benson, M*A*S*H, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

1941 - Dean (Wilmer) Chance
baseball: pitcher: LA Angels: Cy Young Award [1964]

1942 - Randy (Cecil Randolph) Hundley
baseball: catcher: SF Giants, Chicago Cubs [all-star: 1969], Minnesota Twins, SD Padres

1945 - Linda Scott
singer: I’ve Told Every Little Star, Don’t Bet Money Honey, I Don’t Know Why; TV host: Where the Action Is

1947 - Jonathan Pryce
Tony Award-winning actor: Miss Saigon [1991], Comedians [1977]; Hamlet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Carrington, Barbarians at the Gate, The Age of Innocence, Glengarry Glen Ross, Jumpin’ Jack Flash, Brazil, Breaking Glass

1947 - Ron Wood
musician: guitarist: group: Rolling Stones [after 1975]

1948 - Tom Sneva
auto racer: Indianapolis 500 winner [1983]

1949 - Powers Boothe
Emmy Award-winning actor: Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones [1980]; Skag, Sudden Death, Nixon, Extreme Prejudice, The Emerald Forest, Cruising

1950 - Graham Russell
singer: group: Air Supply: Lost in Love, All Out of Love, The One that You Love

1951 - Henry Boucha
hockey: U.S. National Team [1970-71], U.S. Olympic Ice Hockey Team [silver medal: 1972]; NHL: Detroit Red Wings, Minnesota North Stars, Kansas City Scouts, Colorado Rockies

1953 - Diana Canova (Rivero)
actress: Soap, I’m a Big Girl Now, Throb, Home Free, Night Partners, daughter of actress, Judy Canova

1953 - Ronnie Dunn
country singer: duo: Brooks & Dunn: LPs: Brand New Man, Hard Workin’ Man, Waitin’ on Sundown, Borderline, If You See Her, Tight Rope, Steers & Stripes; songwriter: Boot Scootin’ Boogie

1956 - Lisa Hartman
actress: Knots Landing, Tabitha, Bare Essentials, Deadly Blessing, Red Wind, Where the Boys Are

1959 - Alan Wilder
musician: keyboards, singer: group: Depeche Mode: Shake the Disease, LPs: Black Celebration, Music for the Masses

1963 - Mike Joyce
musician: drums: group: The Smiths: Hand in Glove, The Charming Man, What Difference Does It Make, Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now, William, It Was Really Nothing, Reel Around the Fountain, Suffer Little Children, Panic

1968 - Jason Donovan
singer: popular in Australia & Great Britain; actor: Neighbours, Rough Diamonds, The Sun, the Moon and the Stars; son of actor, Terence Donovan.

Chart Toppers
June 1st.

1944 Long Ago and Far Away - Helen Forrest & Dick Haymes
I’ll Get By - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Dick Haymes)
I’ll Be Seing You - The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Frank Sinatra)
Straighten Up and Fly Right - King Cole Trio

1952 Kiss of Fire - Georgia Gibbs
Blue Tango - The Leroy Anderson Orchestra
Be Anything - Eddy Howard
The Wild Side of Life - Hank Thompson

1960 Cathy’s Clown - The Everly Brothers
He’ll Have to Stay - Jeanne Black
Paper Roses - Anita Bryant
Please Help Me, I’m Falling - Hank Lockin

1968 Mrs. Robinson - Simon & Garfunkel
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Hugo Montenegro
Yummy Yummy Yummy - Ohio Express
Honey - Bobby Goldsboro

1976 Love Hangover - Diana Ross
Get Up and Boogie (That’s Right) - Silver Convention
Misty Blue - Dorthy Moore
One Piece at a Time - Johnny Cash

1984 Let’s Hear It for the Boy - Deniece Williams
Time After Time - Cyndi Lauper
Oh Sherrie - Steve Perry
As Long as I’m Rockin’ with You - John Conlee


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)


For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
06-01-2007, 11:00 PM
153rd day of 2007 - 212 remaining.

Saturday, June 2, 2007
TARZAN DAY. :D

He was born on this day in 1904 in Freidorf, near Timisoara, Romania. From the age of three, he was raised in the asphalt jungle of Chicago, but reached the pinnacle of his fame in a tropical jungle. Johnny Weissmuller played the role of Tarzan more than any other actor in a decade of Tarzan films.

Weissmuller was a star athlete, however, way before he became a Hollywood star. An Olympic Gold Medalist, Johnny Weissmuller won a total of five gold medals in swimming in the 1924 and 1928 Olympics. He also collected 52 U.S. and 67 world swimming records.

Without much competition in the swimming pool or in the Tarzan movies, we could say that Weismuller’s only competition was his co-star, Maureen O’Sullivan. Their first [1932] Tarzan movie was Tarzan the Ape Man; the last together was in 1942, titled, Tarzan’s New York Adventure.

“Me Tarzan, you Jane.”

Events
June 2nd.


1886 - Grover Cleveland became the first U.S. President to get married in the White House. He exchanged vows with his bride, Florence Folsom.

1933 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt accepted the first swimming pool to be built inside the White House. Roosevelt got plenty of use out of the pool, considering that he was the only President to be elected four times. He won election over Herbert Hoover, Alf Landon, Wendell Wilkie and Thomas E. Dewey.

1937 - The Fabulous Dr. Tweedy was broadcast on NBC radio for the first time. Frank Morgan starred as the absent-minded Dr. Tweedy.

1937 - CBS presented the first broadcast of Second Husband. The show continued on the air until 1946.

1953 - The coronation of 27-year-old Queen Elizabeth II was broadcast. The crowning of the new Queen of England became one of the first international news events to be given complete coverage on television. All three American TV networks plus the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) provided colorful descriptions of the pomp and circumstance. Most viewers saw the coronation in black and white because color TV was not yet the standard of the industry. Quality of the pictures, in fact, was lacking compared to today’s international and often instantaneous broadcasts. There was no satellite TV transmission at the time. The ‘live’ pictures were relayed by shortwave radio.

1957 - Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was interviewed by CBS-TV. News correspondent Daniel Schorr was first to interview the Soviet leader.

1960 - For the first time in 41 years, the entire Broadway theatre district in New York City was forced to close. The Actors Equity Association and theatre owners came to a showdown with a total blackout of theatres.

1964 - The original cast album of Hello Dolly! went gold -- having sold a million copies. It was quite a feat for a Broadway musical.

1967 - The Beatles’ album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, was released in the U.S. (on Capitol) this day -- one day after its release in the U.K. (on Parlophone). The world is still humming and singing along and tapping fingers and toes to the likes of A Day in the Life, Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, With a Little Help From My Friends, When I'm Sixty-Four, She’s Leaving Home, the title song and several others. It had taken the Fab Four only 12 hours to record their first album, Please, Please Me. It took the supergroup 700 hours to complete Sgt. Pepper’s.

1975 - Baseball’s Billy Martin appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, 19 years after his April 23, 1956 cover debut in the same publication. It set the record for length of time between covers on the same subject.

1985 - The R.J. Reynolds Company proposed a major merger with Nabisco (National Biscuit Company) that would create a $4.9 billion conglomerate of food distribution and other popular products, including tobacco.

1985 - Tommy Sandt had one of those days. Sandt, a major-league baseball player, became one of the few people to be told, “Yer, outta here!” by a home plate umpire -- before the national anthem was played! Sandt got the heave-ho while turning in his team’s lineup card and taking just a moment to complain about an umpire’s call against his team the night before.

1985 - Kareem Abdul-Jabbar became the all-time leading point scorer in the National Basketball Association playoffs. He rang up a total of 4,458 points, smashing the previous record held by Jerry West, also of the Los Angeles Lakers.

1985 - The Huck Finn-based musical Big River earned seven Tony Awards in New York City at the 39th annual awards presentation.

Birthdays
June 2nd.

1740 - Marquis de Sade (Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade)
author: Justine; died Dec 2, 1814

1773 - John Randolph
Virginia statesman and early advocate of the states’ rights: U.S. representative and senator; died May 24, 1833

1835 - Saint Pius X (Giuseppe Melchiorre Sato)
257th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church; died Aug 20, 1914

1840 - Thomas Hardy
writer, poet: related the “...tragedy of 19th-century humanity.”; died Jan 11th 1928

1857 - Sir Edward Elgar
composer: Pomp and Circumstance; died Feb 23, 1934

1890 - Hedda Hopper (Elda Furry)
celebrity columnist; show biz gossip; radio commentator: The Hedda Hopper Show; hat collector; actress: Tarzan’s Revenge, Maid’s Night Out, Breakfast in Hollywood, Dracula’s Daughter; died Feb 1, 1966

1904 - Johnny (Peter John) Weissmuller
swimmer, actor; died Jan 20, 1984; see Tarzan Day [above]

1908 - Ben Grauer
radio actor, announcer: NBC radio: Ben Grauer’s Americana; died May 31, 1977

1917 - Max Showalter
actor: With a Song in My Heart, Bus Stop, It Happened to Jane, The Music Man, Sixteen Candles, Racing with the Moon; died July 30, 2000

1926 - Milo O’Shea
actor: The Playboys, Only the Lonely, Broken Vows, The Purple Rose of Cairo, The Verdict, Sacco & Vanzetti, Paddy, Barbarella, Ulysses

1927 - Carl Butler
country entertainer, songwriter: Don’t Let Me Cross Over, I Never Got Over You, Loving Arms, Just Thought I’d Let You Know; died Sep 4, 1992

1930 - Charles ‘Pete’ Conrad Jr.
NASA astronaut: piloted Gemini 5, commanded Gemini 11, walked on moon [Apollo 12], commanded Skylab 2 space station mission; died July 8, 1999

1932 - Sammy Turner (Samuel Black)
singer: Lavender-Blue [Dilly Dilly], Always, Paradise; LPs: Lavender Blue Moods, Soul of Jesus Christ Superstar

1933 - Jerry (Dean) Lumpe
baseball: NY Yankees [World Series: 1957, 1958], KC Athletics, Detroit Tigers [all-star: 1964]

1937 - Sally Kellerman
actress: M*A*S*H, The Boston Strangler, Brewster McCloud, Fatal Attraction, Meatballs III, Murder Among Friends, Boris and Natasha, Columbo: Ashes to Ashes

1939 - Charles Miller
musician: saxophone, clarinet: group: War: LPs: All Day Music, The World is a Ghetto, Why Can’t We be Friends?

1940 - Jim (James William) Maloney
baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1961/all-star: 1965], California Angels

1941 - (Walter) Stacy Keach Jr.
actor: Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer, Conduct Unbecoming, Sunset Grill, Texas, Road Games, The Long Riders, Brewster McCloud; narrator: Plague Fighters, Olympic Glory, Savage Seas, World’s Most Amazing Videos; host: Missing Reward, Case Closed

1941 - William Guest
singer: group: Gladys Knight & The Pips: Every Beat of My Heart, Letter Full of Tears, Everybody Needs Love, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, If I Were Your Woman, Neither One of Us [Wants to be the First to Say Goodbye], Where Peaceful Waters Flow, Midnight train to Georgia, Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me, I’ve Got to Use My Imagination, On and On, The Way We Were, Try to Remember

1941 - Charlie Watts
musician: drummer: groups: Rolling Stones: [I Can’t Get No] Satisfaction, Honky Tonk Women; solo: LPs: Live at Fulham Town Hall; Charlie Watts Quintet: From One Charlie, A tribute to Charlie Parker with Strings, Warm and Tender, Long Ago & Far Away

1943 - Charles Haid
actor: Hill Street Blues, Delvecchio, Altered States, The Fire Next Time, Children in the Crossfire

1944 - Marvin Hamlisch
Academy Award-winning pianist, composer: for adapted score: The Sting [1973]; original score and song: The Way We Were [1973]; Grammy Award-winner: The Way We Were & Best New Artist; Tony Award-winner: A Chorus Line [1976]

1944 - Garo Yepremian
football: Miami Dolphins kicker: Super Bowl VI, VII, VIII

1948 - Jerry Mathers
actor: Leave It to Beaver, The Trouble with Harry, Back to the Beach

1950 - Joanna Gleason
actress: For Richer for Poorer, F/X 2: The Deadly Art of Illusion, Crimes & Misdemeanors, Heartburn, Into the Woods, Love & War, Hello Larry, Mr. Holland’s Opus, Boogie Nights, Bette; daughter of TV quiz show host Monty Hall

1950 - Lawrence McCutcheon
football: LA Rams running back: Super Bowl XIV

1950 - Nate Williams
basketball: Utah State Univ., Sacramento Kings

1955 - Dana Carvey
actor, comedian, impersonator: Saturday Night Live, Clean Slate, It Happened in Paradise, Wayne’s World

1955 - Gary Grimes
actor: Summer of ’42, Class of ’44, Culpepper Cattle Co.

1959 - Tony Hadley
singer: group: Spandau Ballet: To Cut a Long Story Short, The Freeze, Musclebound, Chant No. 1, Instinction, True, Gold, Only When You Leave

1978 - Nikki Cox
actress: Terminator 2: Judgment Day, General Hospital, Pearl, Sub Down, The Nanny, The Norm Show, Nutty Professor II: The Klumps.

Chart Toppers
June 2nd.


1945 Laura - The Woody Herman Orchestra
Dream - The Pied Pipers
Sentimental Journey - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
At Mail Call Today - Gene Autry

1953 Song from Moulin Rouge - The Percy Faith Orchestra
I Believe - Frankie Laine
April in Portugal - The Les Baxter Orchestra
Take These Chains from My Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Travelin’ Man - Ricky Nelson
Daddy’s Home - Shep & The Limelites
Running Scared - Roy Orbison
Hello Walls - Faron Young

1969 Get Back - The Beatles
Love (Can Make You Happy) - Mercy
Oh Happy Day - The Edwin Hawkins’ Singers
Singing My Song - Tammy Wynette

1977 Sir Duke - Stevie Wonder
I’m Your Boogie Man - KC & The Sunshine Band
Dreams - Fleetwood Mac
Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love) - Waylon Jennings

1985 Everything She Wants - Wham!
Everybody Wants to Rule the World - Tears for Fears
Axel F - Harold Faltermeyer
Don’t Call Him a Cowboy - Conway Twitty


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end... ;)

For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the contents.
You are however, welcomed to PM. me or even start a thread on comments about, Today in history.
Thanks for your kind, considerate understanding. :)

ShadowThomas
06-02-2007, 11:00 PM
154th day of 2007 - 211 remaining.

Sunday, June 3, 2007
MIGHTY CASEY DAY. :)

There was no joy in Mudville this day in 1888, as Casey at the Bat was first published in The San Francisco Examiner. The author was not given a byline in the paper, but he was given $5. Ernest Thayer wrote a series of comic ballads for the San Francisco paper. Casey at the Bat was the last, and the only one to live on through the years.

William DeWolf Hopper, the well-known actor, first recited the poem at Wallach’s Theatre in New York City this same year. That five minutes and 40 seconds became part of DeWolf Hopper’s repertoire. It is said that he had told the tale of Mudville some 10,000 plus times.

In 1986, the U.S. Library of Congress reissued the poem in both written and recorded formats.

Another interesting fact attached to this famous rhyme is that nationally-known, former DJ Casey Kasem once worked in Oakland, a stone’s throw across the bay from San Francisco. His show was titled Mighty Casey at the Mike when he worked at KEWB Radio.

Events
June 3rd.


1800 - John Adams moved to Washington DC. He was the first President to live in what became the capital of the United States. It would be November before he would move into the People’s House, or the Executive Mansion, later known as the White House. Where did President Adams live until he moved into that big house? Holiday Inn, of course.

1849 - The New York Knickerbockers became the first baseball team to wear uniforms. The ball players wore blue trousers, white shirts and straw hats. Sharp!

1856 - Cullen Whipple of Providence, RI patented the screw machine.

1871 - The Ocobock Brothers’ Bank in Corydon, IA was relieved of the sum of $6,000 in cash by 24-year-old Jesse James and his gang of outlaws.

1931 - The Band Wagon, a Broadway musical, opened in New York City. The show ran for 260 performances.

1932 - Lou Gehrig connected for four consecutive home runs -- setting a major-league baseball record.

1932 - John J. McGraw retired as manager of the New York Giants. McGraw had led the Giants to ten National League pennants and three World Series championships.

1937 - Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson of Baltimore, MD, the woman who was the cause of King Edward VIII’s abdication of the British throne, was married this day to the former King (The Duke of Windsor). This was the storybook romance; the king in love with the commoner gives up his throne to spend the rest of his life with the woman he loves. They lived happily ever after ... in France.

1946 - Mutual Radio debuted The Casebook of Gregory Hood. The show was the summer replacement series for Sherlock Holmes. The mystery series became a regular weekly program in the fall of 1946.

1952 - Frank Sinatra recorded the classic Birth of the Blues for Columbia Records.

1959 - The first class to graduate from the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO did so on this day.

1964 - The Hollywood Palace on ABC-TV hosted the first appearance of the first U.S. concert tour of The Rolling Stones. Dean Martin emceed the show. One critic called the Stones “dirtier and streakier and more disheveled than The Beatles.”

1978 - Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams combined their singing talents to reach the number one spot on the nation’s pop music charts with Too Much, Too Little, Too Late.

1985 - After five years, the characters of Nancy and Chris Hughes returned to As the World Turns. CBS-TV brought the couple back to the daytime serial to add more “homespun values” to the show.

1987 - George Michael’s I Want Your Sex was banned by the BBC (for daytime play). Michael had tried to explain that the song was about love, not lust.

Birthdays
June 3rd.


1780 - William Hone
author: [The Every-Day Book] Everlasting Calendar of Popular Amusements; “A good lather is half the shave.”; died Nov 6, 1842

1808 - Jefferson Davis
President of the Confederate States of America [1861-1865]; U.S. Senator and Secretary of War; died Dec 5, 1889

1878 - Barney Oldfield
Indianapolis Speedway Hall of Famer: the first American to drive a mile in a minute [1903]; testimonial for Firestone tires: “My only life insurance.”

1901 - Maurice Evans
actor: Macbeth, Planet of the Apes, Batman, Bewitched; died Mar 12, 1989

1904 - Jan Peerce (Jacob Pincus Perlemuth)
opera singer: tenor; actor: Goodbye, Columbus; died Dec 15, 1984

1910 - Paulette Goddard (Pauline Marion Levy)
actress: So Proudly We Hail!, Time of Indifference, Sins of Jezebel, Reap the Wild Wind, The Women; died Apr 23, 1990

1917 - Leo Gorcey
actor: Dead End Kids/Bowery Boys series: Bowery Buckaroos, Here Come the Marines, ’Neath Brooklyn Bridge, Smuggler’s Cove; died June 2, 1969

1918 - Lili St. Cyr (Willis Marie Van Schaak)
actress: The Naked and the Dead, Son of Sinbad; died Jan 29, 1999

1922 - Alain Resnais
director: Last Year at Marienbad, Stavisky, Providence, On connaît la chanson

1924 - Colleen Dewhurst
Tony Award-winning actress: All the Way Home [1960], A Moon for the Misbegotten [1974]; Desire Under the Elms, Long Day’s Journey into Night, Mourning Becomes Electra, Ah, Wilderness; Emmy Award-winner: Between Two Women [1986], Those She Left Behind [1989], Murphy Brown: Bon and Murphy and Ted and Avery [1991]; died Aug 22, 1991

1925 - Tony Curtis (Bernard Schwartz)
actor: Some Like It Hot, The Great Impostor, The Defiant Ones, Houdini, Trapeze, The Boston Strangler, Christmas in Connecticut, The Count of Monte Cristo

1926 - (Irwin) Allen Ginsberg
Beat Generation poet: Howl, and Other Poems, Kaddish and Other Poems, Reality Sandwiches, The Fall of America: Poems of These States; died Apr 5, 1997

1929 - Chuck Barris
producer: Dating Game, Newlywed Game, Three’s a Crowd; producer/host: The Gong Show; songwriter: Palisades Park; novelist: You and Me, Babe

1932 - Dakota Staton (Aliyah Rabia)
jazz singer: No Man is Going to Change Me, The Late Late Show, Dynamic!, Crazy He Calls Me, Time to Swing; died Apr 10, 2007

1934 - Jim (James Edward) Gentile
‘Diamond Jim’: baseball: Brooklyn Dodgers, LA Dodgers, Baltimore Orioles [2 grand slams in same game: 1961/record shared with 8 others], KC Athletics, Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians

1939 - Ian Hunter (Patterson)
guitar, singer, songwriter: group: Mott the Hoople: All the Young Dudes, Ballad of Mott, All the Way to Memphis, The Golden Age of Rock ’n’ Roll, Saturday Gigs; book: Diary of a Rock Star

1942 - Curtis Mayfield
songwriter; Grammy Award-winning singer: Superfly, Freddie’s Dead; group: The Impressions; inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [3-15-99]; died Dec 26, 1999

1943 - Billy Cunningham
‘Kangaroo Kid’: Basketball Hall of Famer: basketball: Philadelphia 76ers; Carolina Cougars: ABA player of the year [1972]; coach of Philadelphia ’76ers

1944 - Mike Clarke (Michael Dick)
musician: drummer: group: The Byrds: Mr. Tambourine Man, Turn! Turn! Turn!; died Dec 19, 1993

1945 - Hale Irwin
golf champion: U.S. Open [1974, 1979, 1990]: the majors’ oldest winner [45 years]