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TJB
06-04-2006, 04:40 PM
Do you use thunderbird?

Elwood
06-04-2006, 05:01 PM
I use the mail client that's built into SeaMonkey, which Thunderbird was originally based on, so I don't use Thunderbird. I had it installed for a while, but I just prefer having the email client built right into the same app I use to surf the web.

circusboy
06-08-2006, 03:46 PM
No I don't could never get it to work right. I think it's crap.

circusboy
06-08-2006, 03:48 PM
How come you closed the poll after only 7 votes?

Elwood
06-08-2006, 03:59 PM
No I don't could never get it to work right.
Not surprising really.

I think it's crap.
With your record of computing achievement, that might be considered to be High Praise indeed.

There's nothing wrong with Thunderbird, I've used it before. I just prefer using SeaMonkey's built in email client which is what Thunderbird was originally based on. They're both very secure apps.

killian_sh
06-09-2006, 03:56 PM
I didn't get to vote before the poll closed,but I'll still answer in this post.I have used TB for 2.5 years and I love it.I don't play around with it a great deal so I don't know all the things it can do,but it does what I need it to do. :)

circusboy
06-09-2006, 09:21 PM
Not surprising really.


With your record of computing achievement, that might be considered to be High Praise indeed.

There's nothing wrong with Thunderbird, I've used it before. I just prefer using SeaMonkey's built in email client which is what Thunderbird was originally based on. They're both very secure apps.

You have every right to disagree with my opinion.You DON'T have the right to be snide about it!

There is a whole lot of folks that agree with me about Thunderbird. Do they all have questionable computer achivements?
I think not!!!

Elwood
06-09-2006, 09:48 PM
I said that because you called the program "crap", it's not. It took a lot of hard work by a lot of people donating their time and skill for free to create it.

You say you couldn't get Thunderbird to work right, what wouldn't it do for you? Did it send and receive email?

Nothing wrong with Thunderbird, it's a perfectly capable, secure email client. Much better than some offerings out there, especially free ones.

circusboy
06-10-2006, 01:11 AM
I said that because you called the program "crap", it's not. It took a lot of hard work by a lot of people donating their time and skill for free to create it.

You say you couldn't get Thunderbird to work right, what wouldn't it do for you? Did it send and receive email?

Nothing wrong with Thunderbird, it's a perfectly capable, secure email client. Much better than some offerings out there, especially free ones.

Actually I said I thought it was crap. I never said I knew it was crap. Big difference ;) ;)
As far as I can remember The problem was with forwarding messages. They would go to the folder where they can be sent later, and there they would stay.

Elwood
06-10-2006, 09:10 AM
I apologize for belittling you. I shouldn't have done that, but there is nothing wrong with Thunderbird, you obviously didn't have it configured correctly or something else on your system (security app soup) was conflicting.

circusboy
06-10-2006, 11:26 AM
I apologize for belittling you. I shouldn't have done that, but there is nothing wrong with Thunderbird, you obviously didn't have it configured correctly or something else on your system (security app soup) was conflicting.
Hey.No problem. It's easy to become offended when someone puts down something you really believe in.
(security app soup) You are saying security,and apps, and soup right? Or are you talking about something called securiy apps soup

Elwood
06-10-2006, 11:35 AM
That's a term I use to describe situations where people have several security apps running, many of which duplicate functionality and wind up interfering with each other (sometimes cancelling each other out) and other programs installed on the system.

You need a layered defense, but having programs running that try to do the same or very similar jobs wind up having the opposite effect and/or cause slowdowns or other problems on the system.

circusboy
06-10-2006, 07:57 PM
That's a term I use to describe situations where people have several security apps running, many of which duplicate functionality and wind up interfering with each other (sometimes cancelling each other out) and other programs installed on the system.

You need a layered defense, but having programs running that try to do the same or very similar jobs wind up having the opposite effect and/or cause slowdowns or other problems on the system.
Your post is kind of confusing. I was told, on pc asked and answered questions.
that it was ok to have multi protection,especially since some products might catch things others don't.From what I understood you just have to make sure you only have one firewall running,and only one anti spy/adwear running in real time.The rest should be there for periodicle checks only. was also told that it was ok to run ewido real time even if your running another anti spy/adware real time.

Elwood
06-10-2006, 08:53 PM
Sounds like what you've been told is correct, but I have no experience with Ewido, probably okay to have running alongside. Is that how you had things when you were trying to use Thunderbird?

I don't use any type of real-time anti-spyware programs, not really necessary if you only run up-to-date Gecko based browsers (from my experience of the last 5 years anyway) and I'm careful about Java (only enabled when I want it to run).

I'm no Thunderbird expert, but they have an excellent support forum:

Thunderbird Support - MozillaZine Forums (http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewforum.php?f=39&sid=cd8681e7405a530755b425557a5 201f8)

You don't even have to register there to ask questions, but it would be nice to type a nick-name of some kind in the space provided as I'm sure it's difficult to tell "guests" apart.

circusboy
06-10-2006, 10:02 PM
Sounds like what you've been told is correct, but I have no experience with Ewido, probably okay to have running alongside. Is that how you had things when you were trying to use Thunderbird?

I don't use any type of real-time anti-spyware programs, not really necessary if you only run up-to-date Gecko based browsers (from my experience of the last 5 years anyway) and I'm careful about Java (only enabled when I want it to run).

I'm no Thunderbird expert, but they have an excellent support forum:

Thunderbird Support - MozillaZine Forums (http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewforum.php?f=39&sid=cd8681e7405a530755b425557a5 201f8)

You don't even have to register there to ask questions, but it would be nice to type a nick-name of some kind in the space provided as I'm sure it's difficult to tell "guests" apart.

yes thats how things were set up. Is Firefox gecko based? because thats what I'm using now. I also have IE but I keep it disabled. Unless I need it for windows updates. you say 5 years no problems no protection?
Is this pretty common for Gecko based browsers? or are you the exception to the rule?

Elwood
06-10-2006, 10:44 PM
Yes, Firefox, SeaMonkey, K-Meleon browsers are all based on the Gecko rendering engine and as long as you keep up with version updates, you should be pretty safe from web nasties.

Learn how to manage your cookies (tracking cookies are pretty harmless, but still) and you shouldn't have many (any?) problems with spyware. I haven't had a single problem with spyware or any detected in years. I tell Firefox to only accept cookies from the originating web site.

I'm not very cautious, but Java is a potentially exploitable technology when used with any browser, in my opinion, but Sun (the makers of the Java Runtime Environment) are very good about updating their products when vulnerabilities are discovered. This is something that must be updated when necessary and/or disabled and only used at trusted sites.

Javascript (totally different animal from Java) is also potentially exploitable, but as long as you keep up with Firefox version updates, it shouldn't be a problem. There is an excellent extension called NoScript that probably makes Firefox safe from even unknown vulnerabilities, but I don't really think it's necessary, but some swear by it, although I doubt they've actually seen a current version of Firefox exploited because it didn't have NoScript installed.

NoScript can affect web page functionality or even cause a blank page to load (if it requires javscript), but it is a very well written and even a performance enhancing extension if there is a lot of extraneous javascript embedded in sites you visit. I normally use a Firefox profile without NoScript installed, but it's fun and "empowering" to be able to cancel out unnecessary javascript if I want to. :)

There are various other extensions for managing java and javascript, but I wouldn't "mix and match" these in the same Firefox profile. You can have as many Firefox profiles as you want though, I have three Firefox profiles, each configured and extended slightly differently.

circusboy
06-10-2006, 10:51 PM
Yes, Firefox, SeaMonkey, K-Meleon browsers are all based on the Gecko rendering engine and as long as you keep up with version updates, you should be pretty safe from web nasties.

Learn how to manage your cookies (tracking cookies are pretty harmless, but still) and you shouldn't have many (any?) problems with spyware. I haven't had a single problem with spyware or any detected in years. I tell Firefox to only accept cookies from the originating web site.

I'm not very cautious, but Java is a potentially exploitable technology when used with any browser, in my opinion, but Sun (the makers of the Java Runtime Environment) are very good about updating their products when vulnerabilities are discovered. This is something that must be updated when necessary and/or disabled and only used at trusted sites.

Javascript (totally different animal from Java) is also potentially exploitable, but as long as you keep up with Firefox version updates, it shouldn't be a problem. There is an excellent extension called NoScript that probably makes Firefox safe from even unknown vulnerabilities, but I don't really think it's necessary, but some swear by it, although I doubt they've actually seen a current version of Firefox exploited because it didn't have NoScript installed.

NoScript can affect web page functionality or even cause a blank page to load (if it requires javscript), but it is a very well written and even a performance enhancing extension if there is a lot of extraneous javascript embedded in sites you visit. I normally use a Firefox profile without NoScript installed, but it's fun and "empowering" to be able to cancel out unnecessary javascript if I want to. :)

There are various other extensions for managing java and javascript, but I wouldn't "mix and match" these in the same Firefox profile. You can have as many Firefox profiles as you want though, I have three Firefox profiles, each configured and extended slightly differently.

I think the next time something goes wrong with my computer that shouldn't according to all my protection.I'm going to see about configuring my computer the way yours is.That is if you dont mind helping me out.

Bruce
06-10-2006, 11:14 PM
I still use IE, never could figure out ho to configure Firefox.

Elwood
06-10-2006, 11:39 PM
I think the next time something goes wrong with my computer that shouldn't according to all my protection.I'm going to see about configuring my computer the way yours is.That is if you dont mind helping me out.
I'll be glad to help you if I can. I have days that I can hardly drag myself around though, so I may go missing around here at times.
I still use IE, never could figure out ho to configure Firefox.
I'll be glad to help you too, Bruce, if you want to learn more about Firefox.

I'm about to have to get some rest tonight though so, hopefully I'll see y'all tomorrow.

circusboy
06-11-2006, 12:07 AM
I'll be glad to help you if I can. I have days that I can hardly drag myself around though, so I may go missing around here at times.

I'll be glad to help you too, Bruce, if you want to learn more about Firefox.

I'm about to have to get some rest tonight though so, hopefully I'll see y'all tomorrow.

Ok thanks goodnight

Elwood
06-11-2006, 01:09 PM
I've read a little more about Ewido, seems to be a fine product. If I were you, I would run it without any other anti-spyware apps running and of course keep your antivirus and firewall enabled and use Firefox and you should be fine.

Keeo in mind that if your antivirus detects something cached by Firefox, it is fine to let it clean it, but probably unnecessary because Firefox renames files as they are cached so they should be perfectly inert and when you clear your cache, they'll be gone anyway.

If you use IE at all, turn on your favorite dedicated anti-spyware real time protection. Spywareblaster (and Spybot's Immunize function) should also be fine to use if you wish, it's only function in Firefox AFAIK is the blocking of known tracking cookies (and it might possibly block Flash content in Firefox if that option is enabled). I have never used Spywareblaster, but it works by setting "kill bits" in the registry that block known malicious activeX controls (unnecessary in Firefox).

circusboy
06-11-2006, 10:48 PM
I've read a little more about Ewido, seems to be a fine product. If I were you, I would run it without any other anti-spyware apps running and of course keep your antivirus and firewall enabled and use Firefox and you should be fine.

Keeo in mind that if your antivirus detects something cached by Firefox, it is fine to let it clean it, but probably unnecessary because Firefox renames files as they are cached so they should be perfectly inert and when you clear your cache, they'll be gone anyway.

If you use IE at all, turn on your favorite dedicated anti-spyware real time protection. Spywareblaster (and Spybot's Immunize function) should also be fine to use if you wish, it's only function in Firefox AFAIK is the blocking of known tracking cookies (and it might possibly block Flash content in Firefox if that option is enabled). I have never used Spywareblaster, but it works by setting "kill bits" in the registry that block known malicious activeX controls (unnecessary in Firefox).

What I have running real time now is Ewido, and Spybot. (actually what I think runs in real time is Spybots TeaTimer and resident) I think it's ok to keep them both running. I don't really want to disable the TeaTimer function.

You say with Firefox you don't need all that anti this and that protection. But is it ok to keep them on anyway? So I don't have to remember to turn them back on for the rare times I might use IE.

my avast is always finding 2 to 5 instances of tracking cookies in Firefox everytime I run a scan. always medium strength. Does this mean Spybots immune function is not detecting cookies as It should?
Oh by the way. Back when I was still kind of pissed off about your reply to my opinion about Thunderbird. I was going to send you a post asking you to
not repy to any of my threads anymore. Sure glad I didn't. :D

One last thing. Clear your Cache? Don't know how to do that? Would running Disk Cleanup accomplish the same thing? How often should your cache be cleared?

Oops thought I was done. I'm guessing your not a p2p user because of it's
potential to be loaded with nasties. I love to p2p. would that null and void the no anti this and that in Firefox?

Elwood
06-12-2006, 02:42 PM
I don't like TeaTimer, I've seen too many problems caused by its' interference with needed registry changes when installing or uninstalling programs. There are alternatives you might want to look into.

Learn to manage your cookies (for originating web site only) and you shouldn't have problems with tracking cookies (minor "threat" anyway). There are cookie management extensions you might want to look at, like cookie culler. Also there are methods of blocking ad site cookies (these are usually the trackers), I use a proxy auto-configuration file to filter ads and ad site cookies (Spywareblaster should do a similar job in Firefox).

The only time you should need to clear your cache is if you notice you aren't getting the newest version of a page or there are problems loading web sites etc. It's the first thing to try when you have a problem of almost any sort (tools > options > privacy > cache > clear cache now), I don't think disk cleanup has anything to do with Firefox.

If you use P2P, this is probably the most dangerous practice you can engage in. You should have the best antivirus program possible (NOD32 or Kaspersky) and possibly a dedicated anti-trojan (Ewido is probably fine), I use BOClean, but it has never had to spring into action on my system. I don't P2P, but there are precautions you should take to ensure that you only download safe file extensions etc. I'm not up on the P2P thing as I think it is too much of a security risk.

circusboy
06-12-2006, 06:47 PM
I don't like TeaTimer, I've seen too many problems caused by its' interference with needed registry changes when installing or uninstalling programs. There are alternatives you might want to look into.

Learn to manage your cookies (for originating web site only) and you shouldn't have problems with tracking cookies (minor "threat" anyway). There are cookie management extensions you might want to look at, like cookie culler. Also there are methods of blocking ad site cookies (these are usually the trackers), I use a proxy auto-configuration file to filter ads and ad site cookies (Spywareblaster should do a similar job in Firefox).

The only time you should need to clear your cache is if you notice you aren't getting the newest version of a page or there are problems loading web sites etc. It's the first thing to try when you have a problem of almost any sort (tools > options > privacy > cache > clear cache now), I don't think disk cleanup has anything to do with Firefox.

If you use P2P, this is probably the most dangerous practice you can engage in. You should have the best antivirus program possible (NOD32 or Kaspersky) and possibly a dedicated anti-trojan (Ewido is probably fine), I use BOClean, but it has never had to spring into action on my system. I don't P2P, but there are precautions you should take to ensure that you only download safe file extensions etc. I'm not up on the P2P thing as I think it is too much of a security risk.

thanks for all the info I will do my best to not mess up when I try to put it to use>