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Old 04-07-2008, 11:00 PM
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Tuesday, April 8, 2008
GET ALONG LITTLE DOGIE DAY.



Godshall Ranch, Apple Valley, California was the site of the first Intercollegiate Rodeo on this day in 1939.

The students who competed came from just about every major college and university campus in the western United States. The young cowboys and cowgirls competed under the guidance of world champion professional cowboys. Assisting were Harry Carey, Dick Foran, Curley Fletcher, Tex Ritter and Errol Flynn. These stars were used to performing their own rodeo tricks. There were no stunt men or stunt women in those days. The Hollywood stars roped their own little dogies.

The competition was such a success and drew so much attention that it sparked the creation of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association now headquartered in Walla Walla, Washington.

Coincidentally, the ‘Father of Canadian Rodeo’ was born in 1872 on this day in Payson, Utah. O. Raymond Knight produced Canada’s first rodeo, Raymond Stampede in 1902. A year later, he built the first grandstand for rodeo fans and the first chute to channel riders and their steeds as they enter the arena.

More here, and here.

Events
April 8th.



1834 - Cornelius Lawrence became the first mayor to be elected by popular vote in a city election. The voters of New York City decided to make him mayor of their fair city.

1873 - Alfred Paraf of New York City patented the first successful oleomargarine.

1911 - The first squash tournament was played at the Harvard Club in New York City.

1941 - Earle Graser, the eight-year voice of the radio program, The Lone Ranger, died in an auto accident. Brace Beemer, previously the show’s announcer, took over the title role and stayed on the air for 14 years.

1943 - Wendell Wilkie’s One World was published for the first time. In less than two months, sales reached a million copies.

1957 - Jimmy Dean began a morning show on CBS-TV to compete with the first 45 minutes of the Today show on NBC-TV. No, he didn’t stand around in an apron cookin’ sausage and singing Big Bad John for the audience, though it may not have been a bad idea. No sponsors were found for the show and it was back to the smokehouse for Jimmy when CBS quickly sliced the show from the network.

1963 - Steve Brooks became only the fifth race jockey to ride 4,000 career winners.

1963 - Seven Oscars including the #1 award for Best Picture went to Lawrence of Arabia (Sam Spiegel, producer) at the 35th Annual Academy Awards at Santa Monica’s Civic Auditorium (Los Angeles). The epic production earned Oscars for David Lean (Best Director); Freddie Young (Best Cinematography/Color); John Box, John Stoll, & Dario Simoni (Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Color); John Cox with Shepperton SSD (Best Sound); Anne V. Coates (Best Film Editing); Maurice Jarre (Best Music/Score - Substantially Original). Ol’ Blue Eyes hosted the festivities honoring the films of 1962 (including the film Sinatra starred in, The Manchurian Candidate.) Other notable flicks of that year including some award winners, and some not: Taras Bulba, Mutiny on the Bounty, Walk on the Wild Side, The Longest Day, The Music Man, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Birdman of Alcatraz. Those that won the top awards other than Lawrence of Arabia were To Kill a Mockingbird (Best Actor - Gregory Peck; Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Black-and-White - Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead, Oliver Emert; Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium - Horton Foote); The Miracle Worker (Best Actress - Anne Bancroft, Best Supporting Actress - Patty Duke) ; Sweet Bird of Youth (Best Supporting Actor - Ed Begley); and Days of Wine and Roses [title song] (Best Music/Song: - Henry Mancini (music), Johnny Mercer lyrics).

1968 - The Beatles went gold again, receiving a gold record for the single, Lady Madonna.

1969 - The Montreal Expos and the New York Mets played in Shea Stadium in New York in the first international baseball game in the major leagues.

1971 - Chicago became the first rock group to play Carnegie Hall in New York City. Through the 1970s and 1980s, Chicago scored big with these hits: Make Me Smile, 25 or 6 to 4, Saturday in the Park, Old Days, Baby, What a Big Surprise, Hard to Say I’m Sorry and many others.

1974 - It was one historic night in sports in Atlanta’s Fulton County Stadium. Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s home run record by collecting his 715th round-tripper. Hammerin’ Hank trotted into baseball immortality as the Braves beat the Los Angeles Dodgers, 7 to 4. Aaron finished his career two years later with 755 home runs; a record that still stands. When he retired from baseball, Hank Aaron also held a first place record for RBIs.

1975 - The Godfather: Part II won half of the top six awards at the 47th Annual Academy Awards at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. It won for Best Picture: (Francis Ford Coppola, Gray Frederickson, Fred Roos, producers); Best Director (Francis Ford Coppola); and Best Supporting Actor (Robert De Niro); plus Best Writing/Screenplay Adapted from Other Material (Francis Coppola, Mario Puzo); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Dean Tavoularis, Angelo P. Graham, George Nelson; and Best Music/Original Dramatic Score (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola). The other three crowd-pleaser awards went to Best Actor Art Carney for his Harry and Tonto role; to Best Actress Ellen Burstyn for her part in Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore; and to Ingrid Bergman as Best Supporting Actress in Murder on the Orient Express. Hosts Sammy Davis Jr., Bob Hope, Shirley MacLaine, and Frank Sinatra livened up the party, even though murder, intrigue and disaster were in the run. The award for Best Music/Song went to Al Kasha & Joel Hirschhorn for We May Never Love Like This Again from the Towering Inferno. Inferno also won for Best Cinematography (Fred J. Koenekamp, Joseph F. Biroc) and Best Film Editing (Harold F. Kress & Carl Kress); while Best Sound went to Earthquake (Ronald Pierce and Melvin M. Metcalfe, Sr.) and Robert Towne’s Chinatown won for Best Writing/Original Screenplay.

1985 - Comedienne Phyllis Diller underwent a surgical procedure for permanent eye liner to eliminate the need for eyelid makeup. Must have been a real sloooow day over at Phyllis’ house.

1986 - It took 18 years of singing the U.S. national anthem, but on this day, at long last, baritone Robert Merrill of the Metropolitan Opera became the first person to both sing the anthem and throw out the first ball at Yankee Stadium for the Yanks home opener.


Birthdays
April 8th.


563 B.C.- Buddha (Shakyamuni)
‘The Enlightened One’ in the Buddhist faith; died Feb 15, 483 B.C.

1872 - Ray (O. Raymond) Knight
‘Father of Canadian Rodeo’: conceived, coined, organized first Canadian stampede (rodeo); town of Raymond, Alberta Canada named for him; see Get Along Little Dogie Day [above]

1892 - Mary Pickford (Gladys Louise Smith)
Academy Award-winning actress: Coquette [1928-29], Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Stella Maris, The Taming of the Shrew, Pollyanna, A Poor Little Rich Girl; died May 29, 1979

1912 - Sonja Henie
ice skater: Norwegian Olympic gold medalist [1928, 1932, 1936]; World Champion [1927 thru 1936]; died Oct 12, 1969

1918 - Elizabeth ‘Betty’ Ford (Bloomer)
First Lady: wife of 38th U.S. President Gerald R. Ford; founder of the Betty Ford Clinic for substance abuse rehabilitation

1921 - Franco (Dario) Corelli
tenor: debut: Spoleto (Italy) as Don José in G. Bizet’s Carmen [1951]; in films: Great Moments in Opera, Franco Corelli in Tosca, The Great Tenors - Voice of Firestone Classic Performances

1922 - Carmen McRae
jazz singer: The Next Time It Happens, Skyliner; died Nov 10, 1994

1923 - Edward Mulhare
actor: Megaforce, Our Man Flint, Von Ryan’s Express, Knight Rider; died May 24, 1997

1926 - Shecky Greene (Sheldon Greenfield)
comedian, Las Vegas nightclub performer; actor: Splash, Mel Brooks’ History of the World -- Part 1, Tony Rome, Laverne and Shirley, The A-Team, Northern Exposure

1927 - Charlie (Charles Richard) ‘Smokey’ Maxwell
baseball: Boston Red Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Detroit Tigers [all-star: 1956, 1957], Chicago White Sox

1928 - John Gavin (Anthony Golenour)
actor: Psycho, Spartacus, A Time to Love & a Time to Die, Sophia Loren: Her Own Story

1928 - Monty Sunshine
jazz musician: clarinet: Petite Fleur; played in film: Look Back in Anger

1929 - Jacques Brel
singer, songwriter: Jackie, Next, If You Go Away, I’m Not Afraid; appeared in his own French version of Man of La Mancha and in film: Montdragon; died Oct 9, 1978

1940 - John Havlicek
Basketball Hall of Famer: Boston Celtics [eight NBA championship teams: 1963-1966, 1968-1969, 1974, 1976/13 NBA All-Star Games: 1966-1978/four-time All-NBA First Team: 1971-74/five-time NBA All-Defensive First Team (1972-1976]; Celtics all-time leading scorer [26,395 points]

1941 - Peggy Lennon
singer: group: The Lennon Sisters: The Lawrence Welk Show

1942 - Roger Chapman
singer: groups: Shortlist, Streetwalkers, Family: Hung Up Down, The Weaver’s Answer, No Mule’s Fool, In My Own Time, Burlesque

1943 - John (Frederick) Hiller
baseball: pitcher: Detroit Tigers [World Series: 1968/all-star: 1974

1946 - Jim (James Augustus) ‘Catfish’ Hunter
baseball: pitcher: KC Athletics [all-star: 1966, 1967], Oakland Athletics [Cy Young Award- winner: 1974/all-star: 1970, 1972-1974/World Series: 1972-1974], NY Yankees [all-star: 1975, 1978/World Series: 1976-1978]; died Aug 9, 1999 [ALS: Lou Gehrig’s disease]

1946 - Stuart Pankin
actor: The San Pedro Beach Bums, No Soap Radio, Nearly Departed, Knots Landing, Falcon Crest, Not Necessarily the News, the voice of Earl Sinclair in Dinosaurs, Father and Scout, Irreconcilable Differences, Arachnophobia, Fatal Attraction, Dirt Bike Kid

1947 - Steve Howe
musician: guitar, singer: groups: Asia: Heat of the Moment, Only Time Will Tell; Bodast; Yes: Roundabouts; Tomorrow: My White Bicycle, Real Life Permanent Dream, Auntie Mary’s Dress Shop, An Excerpt from a Teenage Opera, Sam

1960 - John (Richard) Schneider
actor: Second Chances, Heaven Help Us, Grand Slam, Dukes of Hazzard, Night of the Twisters, Texas, Speed Zone, Stagecoach, Cocaine Wars, Smokey and the Bandit

1963 - Julian Lennon
singer: Valotte, Too Late for Goodbyes; son of John and Cynthia Lennon

1968 - Patricia Arquette
actress: Medium, Flirting with Disaster, Holy Matrimony, True Romance, A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors; granddaughter of actor Cliff Arquette and sister of actress Roseanna Arquette.


Chart Toppers
April 8th.


1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
Personality - Johnny Mercer
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Cross Over the Bridge - Patti Page
A Girl, A Girl - Eddie Fisher
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares
Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Slow Twistin’ - Chubby Checker
She’s Got You - Patsy Cline

1970 Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel
Let It Be - The Beatles
Instant Karma (We All Shine On) - John Ono Lennon
Tennessee Bird Walk - Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Ready for the Times to Get Better - Crystal Gayle

1986 Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. - John Cougar Mellencamp
Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
100% Chance of Rain - Gary Morris


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
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  #442  
Old 04-08-2008, 11:00 PM
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Wednesday, April 9, 2008
3-D MOVIE DAY.


The year was 1953. Warner Brothers, the first of the major Hollywood studios to introduce 3-D motion pictures, chose this day to premiere The House of Wax at the Paramount Theatre in New York City. The stage show preceding the movie was headed by singer Eddie Fisher. The film’s stars, Vincent Price, Phyllis Kirk and Frank Lovejoy attended the premiere.

A precursor to Warner’s 3-D presentation occurred in 1922 when The Power of Love opened in Los Angeles. The feature-length movie was filmed in a stereoscopic process called Fairall.

The first official 3-D movie (viewed with special glasses), Bwana Devil, premiered in LA five months before the major studios got into the act. It starred Robert Stack and Barbara Britton. Although the critics panned the flick as “low-grade melodrama with Polaroid glasses,” the long lines at the box office convinced Warner and others to plan their own 3-D productions. In fact, 23 3-D films were released in 1953, The House of Wax being the first.

Click, and click.

Events
April 9th.



1833 - Peterborough, NH opened the first municipally supported public library.

1872 - S.R. Percy of New York City received a patent for dried milk. Yummy!

1905 - The first aerial ferry bridge went into operation -- in Duluth, Minnesota.

1912 - The Boston Red Sox defeated Harvard 2-0 on this, the day that Fenway Park was opened for the first time. Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski, Carlton Fisk, Jim Rice, Roger Clemens, and Babe Ruth played ball at Fenway and faced the ‘Green Monster’, the huge wall in left field. Until the Humane Society ordered him to stop, Ted Williams used to take rifle shots at the many pigeons that flew around the stadium. In 1954, a ball thrown to stop a player from making a double out of a single, hit a pigeon in flight. Allegedly, the bird fell to the ground, got up and then flew away to safer territory. The ball deflected right to the second baseman, who put the tag on the runner.

1928 - Mae West made her glamorous debut on Broadway in the classic production of Diamond Lil.

1940 - Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra, along with singer Helen O’Connell, recorded Six Lessons from Madame La Zonga for Decca Records.

1947 - Branch Rickey of the Brooklyn Dodgers announced the purchase of the baseball contract that would bring slugger Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to the Dodgers from Montreal.

1950 - Bob Hope hosted a Star-Spangled Review on NBC-TV. Hope became the highest-paid performer for a single show on TV. The Star-Spangled Review was a musical special.

1953 - Cincinnati baseball officials said that the National League team wanted to be known as the Redlegs and not the Reds. This was understandable, with the McCarthy Hearings bringing to light the alleged infiltration of Communist reds in the United States in government, politics and entertainment.

1962 - President John F. Kennedy opened the Washington Senators’ baseball season by throwing out the first ball at the new D.C. Stadium (later to be known as Robert F. Kennedy Stadium [RFK]). The original Senators had left Washington for Minnesota in 1961. As part of the agreement to allow the Senators to move, an expansion team had to be granted to DC. The expansion Washington Senators moved to Texas and became the Rangers. The owner who moved the expansion team to Texas was Bob Short, a businessman from Minnesota. Short once ran for the Senate in Minnesota. Wouldn’t that have been interesting - the man who moved the Senators from DC might have moved into DC as a Senator!

1962 - Musicals and comedies led the list of award-winners and nominees at the 34th Annual Academy Awards held at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Los Angeles and hosted by comedian Bob Hope. The Broadway musical in the guise of a Hollywood film, West Side Story, was awarded the Oscar for Best Picture (Robert Wise, producer); Best Director (Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins); Best Supporting Actor and Actress (George Chakiris, Rita Moreno); Best Cinematography/Color (Daniel L. Fapp); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration/Color (Boris Leven, Victor A. Gangelin); Best Costume Design/Color (Irene Sharaff); Best Sound (Fred Hynes-Todd-AO SSD & Gordon Sawyer-Samuel Goldwyn SSD); Best Film Editing (Thomas Stanford); Best Music/Scoring of a Musical Picture (Saul Chaplin, Johnny Green, Sid Ramin, Irwin Kostal). Were their any golden statuettes left for any other flick? A few ... the Best Actor award went to Maximilian Schell for his role in Judgment at Nuremberg , and for the first time in Oscar history, the Best Actress award went to an actress in a foreign film, Sophia Loren for the lead in La Ciociara (or Two Women). The Hustler, Splendor in the Grass and The Guns of Navarone won a total of four Oscars. Now, back to musicals -- the Best Music/Song was Moon River (Henry Mancini-music, Johnny Mercer-lyrics) from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The list of comedic and musical movies from 1961 that were nominated but didn’t win is equally impressive: The Absent-Minded Professor, The Parent Trap, The Children’s Hour, Babes in Toyland, Pocketful of Miracles, Flower Drum Song, Fanny ... let’s all sing along with Barbra, now ...

1965 - TIME magazine featured a cover with the entire Peanuts gang on this day. It was a good day for Charlie Brown.

1965 - Major-league baseball played its first indoor game. President Lyndon B. Johnson attended the opening of the Astrodome in Houston, Texas. The indoor stadium was termed the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’.

1973 - Tommy Aaron became the second native son from Georgia to win the Masters golf title at Augusta. The first Georgian to accomplish the feat was Claude Harmon in 1948.

1977 - The Swedish pop group Abba made its debut at number one on the American pop charts, as Dancing Queen became the most popular record in the U.S.

1979 - Drama and war headlined the films winning most of the awards at the 51st Annual Academy Awards ceremony at Los Angeles’ Dorothy Chandler Pavilion (L.A. Music Center). The Best Picture, The Deer Hunter (Barry Spikings, Michael Deeley, Michael Cimino, John Peverall, producers), also won for Best Director (Michael Cimino); Best Supporting Actor (Christopher Walken); Best Film Editing (Peter Zinner); and Best Sound (Richard Portman, William McCaughey, Aaron Rochin, C. Darin Knight). The Best Actor and Actress awards for performances in Coming Home were awarded to Jon Voight and Jane Fonda, respectively. This 1978 film also won a golden statuette for Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Nancy Dowd, Waldo Salt, Robert C. Jones). The intense Midnight Express won for Best Music/Original Score (Giorgio Moroder)and Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Oliver Stone). On the lighter side, the Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role went to Maggie Smith in California Suite, the Best Music/Song Oscar, for Last Dance from Thank God It’s Friday, went to Paul Jabara, and Johnny Carson was the host.

1984 - Johnny Carson used his own terms of endearment to bring laughter to the TV audience and the audience in attendance at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. It was the 56th Annual Academy Awards, and Terms of Endearment (James L. Brooks, producer) was voted Best Picture of 1983. Terms also won for Best Director (James L. Brooks, again ... and, again for Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium);and Best Supporting Actor (Jack Nicholson); and for Best Actress (Shirley MacLaine). MacLaine had been nominated five times over 26 years before winning the statuette. Of course, since she could see into the future, she knew that this would happen. Robert Duvall picked up the Best Actor Award (Tender Mercies) and the Best Supporting Actress title was bestowed on Linda Hunt for The Year of Living Dangerously. A foreign film, Fanny & Alexander, won three Academy Awards: Best Costume Design (Marik Vos-Lundh), Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Anna Asp, Susanne Lingheim), & Best Cinematography (Sven Nykvist). Another film that endeared itself to audiences in 1983 was The Right Stuff, honored for Best Music/Original Score (Bill Conti); Best Effects/Sound Effects Editing (Jay Boekelheide); Best Film Editing (Glenn Farr, Lisa Fruchtman, Stephen A. Rotter, Douglas Stewart, Tom Rolf); and Best Sound (Mark Berger, Thomas Scott, Randy Thom, David MacMillan). Put the whole evening together and you get the Best Music/Song: Flashdance...What a Feeling (Giorgio Moroder-music, Keith Forsey and Irene Cara-lyrics) from the movie, Flashdance.

1985 - Tom Seaver broke a major-league baseball record (held by Walter Johnson) as he started his 15th opening-day game. The Chicago White Sox defeated the Milwaukee Brewers 4-2. With the win, ‘Tom Terrific’ extended his opening day record to 7-1. He had thrown openers for the New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds and the Chicago White Sox.

1988 - Singer Brook Benton died in New York of bacterial meningitis. He was 56. We remember Benton for many hits. Among them: It’s Just a Matter of Time, So Many Ways, Endlessly, Rainy Night in Georgia, and Baby (You’ve Got What It Takes) (w/Dinah Washington).


Birthdays
April 9th.


1883 - Frank King
cartoonist: creator of Gasoline Alley cartoon strip; died June 25, 1969

1898 - Paul Robeson
singer: Ol’ Man River; actor: The Emperor Jones, Show Boat, Othello, Porgy and Bess, The Hairy Ape, King Solomon’s Mines, Song of Freedom; died Jan 23, 1976

1903 - Ward (Wardell) Bond
actor: Wagon Train, Gone with the Wind, Drums Along the Mohawk, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Maltese Falcon, Mister Roberts, Rio Bravo, Tall in the Saddle, The Time of Your Life; died Nov 5, 1960

1906 - Antal Dorati
symphony orchestra conductor; died Nov 13, 1988

1916 - Julian Dash
jazz musician: tenor sax: No Soap, Midnight Stroll, Double Shot, Gin Mill Special, Weddin’ Blues, My Silent Love, Long Moan, Creamin’, Goin’ Along; died Feb 25, 1974

1920 - Art Van Damme
musician: accordionist: group: Art Van Damme Quintet

1926 - Jack Nichols
basketball: Boston Celtics

1926 - Hugh Hefner
publisher: Playboy magazine

1928 - Paul Arizin
Basketball Hall of Famer: NBA Silver Anniversary Team [1971]; Philadelphia Warriors: led league in scoring [1951-52] [1956-57]; NBA’s fifth player to score over 10,000

1928 - Tom Lehrer
songwriter: Vatican Rag, Werner Von Braun, The Old Dope Peddlar, Be Prepared, Lobachevsky, The Masochism Tango, New Math, National Brotherhood Week, I Wanna Go Back to Dixie, We Will All Go Together When We Go

1932 - Carl Perkins (Carl Lee Perkings)
singer: Blue Suede Shoes, Your True Love, Honey Don’t, Pink Pedal Pushers, Shine Shine, Cotton Top, Restless; inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987; died Jan 19, 1998

1933 - Jean-Paul Belmondo
actor: Casino Royale, The Brain, Is Paris Burning?, Swashbuckler, Le Magnifique, Love and the Frenchwoman

1935 - Avery Schreiber
comedian: half of comedy duo Burns & Schreiber; died Jan 7, 2002

1939 - Michael Learned
Emmy Award-winning actress: The Waltons [1972-73, 1973-74, 1975-76; Nurse [1981-82]; Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, All My Sons, Deadly Business, A Christmas Without Snow

1940 - Jim Roberts
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, SL Blues

1942 - (Andre) Brandon de Wilde
actor: Shane, Hud, In Harm’s Way, The Member of the Wedding, Goodbye My Lady, All Fall Down; killed in car crash July 6, 1972 [Denver CO: while en route to act in a stage play]

1943 - Terry Knight
singer: Groups: Terry Knight and the Pack: I Who Have Nothing; founded Grand Funk Railroad: On Time

1945 - Alden Roche
football: Green Bay Packers

1946 - Nate (Nathan) Colbert
baseball: Houston Astros, SD Padres [all-star: 1971-1973], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos, Oakland Athletics

1946 - Les Gray
singer: group: Mud: Tiger Feet, Lonely This Christmas, Oh Boy

1948 - Michel Parizeau
hockey: NHL: Philadelphia Flyers, SL Blues

1954 - Dennis Quaid
actor: Dragonheart, Wyatt Earp, Postcards from the Edge, Everybody’s All-American, The Right Stuff, Jaws 3, The Long Riders, Breaking Away, September 30, 1955, Switchback, Frequency, Traffic; songwriter, actor: The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia, Tough Enough, The Big Easy; brother of actor Randy Quaid

1957 - Severiano (Seve) Ballesteros
golf: youngest to win Harry Vardon Trophy [Paris: 1976]; won over thirty major golf tournaments on five continents; 54 PGA European Tour Tournaments, 14 International, 4 others

1961 - Mark Kelly
musician: keyboards: group: Marillion: Market Square Heroes, Grendel, Lavender, Heart of Lothian

1966 - Cynthia Nixon
actress: Let It Ride, Tanner, The Manhattan Project, Tattoo, Amadeus

1979 - Keshia Knight Pulliam
actress: The Cosby Show.


Chart Toppers
April 9th.


1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
How are Things in Glocca Morra - Buddy Clark
Managua, Nicaragua - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Don Rodney)
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
South Street - The Orlons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me) - The Temptations
For All We Know - Carpenters
What’s Going On - Marvin Gaye
After the Fire is Gone - Conway Twitty & Loretta Lynn

1979 I Will Survive - Gloria Gaynor
What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Sultans of Swing - Dire Straits
I Just Fall in Love Again - Anne Murray

1987 Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
Tonight, Tonight, Tonight - Genesis
Come Go with Me - Expose
Ocean Front Property - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #443  
Old 04-09-2008, 11:00 PM
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ShadowThomas ShadowThomas is offline
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101st. day of 2008 - 265 remaining.

Thursday, April 10, 2008
PGA DAY.


Inaugurated in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association (PGA) held its first championship tournament on this day. This first PGA Championship title went to Britisher, Jim Barnes. Barnes won the match-play event at Siwanoy golf course in Bronxville, NY and was presented with a trophy and the major share of the $2,580 purse.

Much has changed in the PGA since that spring day in 1916. The event was changed to a 72-hole, stroke-play game in 1958. The LPGA for women golfers was instituted in 1950 and the Senior PGA Tour for players 50 and older began in 1982.

Two players have won the title five times: Walter Hagen and Jack Nicklaus. Hagen also holds the record for most consecutive wins from 1924 through 1927. The lowest 72-hole total of 271 was garnered by Bobby Nichols in 1964. The honors of being the oldest champion belongs to Julius Boros. He won in 1968 at the age of 48 plus 140 days; while Gene Sarazen was given the title of youngest champion. In 1922, Gene was just 20 years and 173 days old when he took home the PGA title.

We won’t even mention what today’s PGA purses are worth. Fore!

More here, and here.

Events
April 10th.


1849 - Walter Hunt of New York City patented the safety pin. Most of us still use the device which comes in a variety of sizes and is quite handy to have around. Mr. Hunt, however, didn’t think so. He thought the safety pin to be a temporary convenience and sold the patent for a total of $400. Bet he could just ‘stick’ himself for doing that.

1927 - Ballet Mécanique was presented for the first time at Carnegie Hall in New York City. This was the first symphonic work that called for an airplane propeller and other mechanical contraptions not normally associated with the ballet.

1937 - Collier’s magazine published two short stories this day which would later become motion pictures; a first for a single magazine issue. Stage to Lordsburg, written by Ernest Haycox, was made into the 1939 film classic, Stagecoach, starring John Wayne. Hagar Wilde’s story was turned into a movie that reflected the title of his work, Bringing Up Baby. The 1938 film starred Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.

1953 - Eddie Fisher was discharged from the Army and arrived home to a nice paycheck of $330,000 in record royalties. Fisher sold 7 million records for RCA Victor while on furloughs. Anytime was just one of several hits recorded during his stint in the Army.

1958 - Dick Clark devoted an hour of his American Bandstand afternoon TV show to the memory of Chuck Willis who had died earlier in the day from peritonitis. Willis was from Atlanta, GA and recorded hits that included: C.C. Rider, Betty and Dupree, What Am I Living For (his biggest hit) and Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Willis was a noted rhythm and blues singer and songwriter of the early rock era.

1961 - Gary Player of South Africa became the first foreign golfer to win the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, Georgia. Player, age 25, won by just one stroke over both Charles Coe, an amateur, and defending champion Arnold Palmer. Coe shot a record 280, which was the lowest score turned in by an amateur at the Masters up to that time.

1967 - Bob Hope was the host/referee as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf and A Man for All Seasons duked it out at the 39th Annual Academy Awards. The arena was the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles. Virginia Woolf came loaded with 13 nominations, her opponent, A Man for All Seasons, was the underdog with 8. At first it was blow for blow, Virginia Woolf winning Best Costume Design/Black-and-White (Irene Sharaff) and Seasons winning the award in the Color category (Joan Bridge and Elizabeth Haffenden); Seasons winning Best Cinematography/Color (Ted Moore) and Virginia Woolf winning in the Black-and-White division (Haskell Wexler). Then Virgina Woolf won for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration, Black-and-White (George James Hopkins, Richard Sylbert) while Seasons took the Oscar for Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Robert Bolt). They were tied. Best Supporting Actress: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (Sandy Dennis), but Best Supporting Actor went to Walter Matthau in The Fortune Cookie. Virginia Woolf, ahead by one. The Best Music/Song Oscar went to Born Free (John Barry-music, Don Black-lyrics) from the movie of the same title. The fight was still on since neither Seasons nor Virginia Woolf was nominated in that category. It was time for the Academy Award for Best Actress. And the Oscar goes to Elizabeth Taylor for Who’s Afraid of Virginnia Woolf. The 1966 movie about bad marriages and booze was now two ahead. Would the drama about Thomas More garner a Best Actor Oscar for Paul Scofield? Yes! Two awards left ... Would it be Mike Nichols, director of Virginia Woolf or Fred Zinnemann. Fred Zinnemann wins for Seasons and the two are tied. The envelope holding the title of the Best Picture of 1966 revealed the overall winner as A Man for All Seasons, Fred Zinnemann, producer.

1968 - This was not the usual Monday night Oscar celebration at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in LA. In fact, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences postponed the 40th Annual Academy Awards ceremonies two days because of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. Ironically, the Best Picture of 1967, In the Heat of the Night (Walter Mirisch, producer), and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (Best Actress: Katharine Hepburn) and Best Writing/Story and Screenplay/Written Directly for the Screen (William Rose), have racial themes. Heat won four more Oscars that evening: Best Actor (Rod Steiger); Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Stirling Silliphant); Best Sound (Samuel Goldwyn SSD); Best Film Editing (Hal Ashby). Bob Hope, as host, livened up the somber ceremonies as did awards for Best Supporting Actor George Kennedy (Cool Hand Luke), Best Supporting Actress Estelle Parsons (Bonnie and Clyde); Best Music/Song, Talk to the Animals from Doctor Dolittle (Leslie Bricusse). Mike Nichols who lost to The Man for All Seasons the previous year, won this time, as Best Director for The Graduate. Other serious contenders for the golden statuette were: Casino Royale, Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Dirty Dozen, Divorce American Style, Camelot, The Jungle Book, Far from the Madding Crowd, Valley of the Dolls, In Cold Blood, Barefoot in the Park. Some were winners, some not so lucky.

1970 - Officially resigning from The Beatles, Paul McCartney disbanded the most influential rock group in history at a public news conference. The Beatles hit, Let It Be, was riding high on the pop charts. The last recording for the group, The Long and Winding Road (also from the documentary film Let It Be), would be number one for two weeks beginning on June 13, bringing to a close one of contemporary music’s greatest dynasties.

1972 - Once again, the 44th Annual Academy Awards celebration was held at Los Angeles’ Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. And, once again, everyone was spellbound waiting to hear who won Best Picture. It wasn’t an easy decision. The nominees were: A Clockwork Orange, Fiddler on the Roof, The Last Picture Show, Nicholas and Alexandra and The French Connection. And the Oscar goes to ... The French Connection, Philip D’Antoni, producer. The Oscar also went to The French Connection for Best Director (William Friedkin); Best Actor (Gene Hackman); Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Ernest Tidyman); and Best Film Editing (Gerald B. Greenberg). All of the other Best Picture nominees (except A Clockwork Orange) also received Oscars: The Last Picture Show won for both supporting actor and actress (Ben Johnson and Cloris Leachman respectively); Fiddler on the Roof won for Best Cinematography (Oswald Morris), Best Sound (Gordon K. McCallum, David Hildyard) and Best Music/Scoring Adaptation/Original Song Score (John Williams); Nicholas and Alexandra won the awards for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (John Box, Ernest Archer, Jack Maxsted, Gil Parrondo, Vernon Dixon) and Best Costume Design (Yvonne Blake, Antonio Castillo). Klute won one out of its two nominations: Best Actress (Jane Fonda) and Shaft won its only nomination: Best Music/Song (Isaac Hayes, Theme from Shaft. Other films from 1971 that received accolades ... but not necessarily Oscars: Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory; Sunday Bloody Sunday; Carnal Knowledge; Summer of ’42, Bedknobs and Broomsticks; Mary, Queen of Scots; and McCabe & Mrs. Miller. And much applause went to the hosts of the evening’s festivities: Helen Hayes, Alan King, Sammy Davis Jr., and Jack Lemmon.

1985 - Relief pitcher, Dan Quisenberry was signed by the Kansas City Royals to a contract that promised he would “...never wear another uniform.” The lifetime pact was worth $43 million, after taxes, over a 40-year period. Quisenberry became known as the ‘Fireman’, for putting out late-inning fires and saving games for the Royals. The contract made him the game’s highest-paid reliever.

1985 - Eddie Murphy’s Beverly Hills Cop made it to the top ten on the list of top-grossing motion pictures. The film, at number nine on the list, was the only R-rated and non-summer movie to make the list.


Birthdays
April 10th.



1829 - William Booth
founder of the Salvation Army; author: In Darkest England, The Way Out; died Aug 20, 1912

1847 - Joseph Pulitzer
publisher: St. Louis Dispatch, New York World; died in 1911: his will left $2 million for establishment of school of journalism at Columbia Univ. and a fund which established annual prizes for literature, drama, music and journalism; died Oct 29, 1911

1882 - Frances Perkins (Mrs. Paul Caldwell Wilson)
first woman U.S. presidential cabinet member: Secretary of Labor [1933-1945]; died May 14, 1965

1885 - Bernard Gimbel
merchant: Gimbel’s Department Stores; died Sep 29, 1966

1911 - Martin Denny
composer, arranger, pianist: Quiet Village, The Enchanted Sea; died Mar 2, 2005

1915 - Harry Morgan (Bratsburg)
Emmy Award-winning actor: M*A*S*H [1979-80]; Dragnet, You Can’t Take It with You, Pete and Gladys, HEC Ramsey, December Bride, The D.A., Aftermash

1917 - Robert Woodward
Nobel Prize-winning scientist [1965]: study of the molecular structure of complex organic compounds; died July 8, 1979

1921 - Chuck (Kevin Joseph) Connors
actor: The Rifleman, Roots, The Yellow Rose, Werewolf, Cowboy in Africa, Branded; host: Thrill Seekers; died Nov 10, 1992

1921 - Sheb Wooley
CMA comic of the Year [1968]; singer, songwriter: The Purple People Eater, Are You Satisfied, Hee Haw theme; actor: Rawhide, High Noon, Rocky Mountain, Giant, Hoosiers; died Sep 16, 2003

1929 - Max Von Sydow
actor: Dune, The Exorcist, The Seventh Seal, The Emigrants, Flash Gordon, Hannah and Her Sisters, Hawaii, The Quiller Memorandum, Quo Vadis, Three Days of the Condor

1932 - Omar Sharif (Michael Shalhoub)
actor: Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, Funny Girl, Funny Lady, Peter the Great, Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna, Beyond Justice, Crime & Passion

1934 - David Halberstam
author: The Best and the Brightest, The Summer of ’49

1936 - John Madden
football: San Diego State defensive coordinator; NFL: head coach: Oakland Raiders [103 wins, 32 losses, 7 ties]; TV sports broadcaster: CBS, FOX [11 Emmy Awards as Outstanding Sports Personality-Analyst]; author: Hey Wait a Minute, I Wrote a Book!, One Knee Equals Two Feet (and Everything Else You Wanted to Know About Football), One Size Doesn’t Fit All, All Madden, John Madden’s Ultimate Tailgate Cookbook; video game marketer: John Madden Football; fear of flying puts him on trains and his customized bus

1936 - Bobbie Smith
singer: group: The Spinners

1938 - ‘Dandy’ Don (Joe) Meredith
football: Dallas Cowboys; broadcaster: ABC Monday Night Football: “Turn out the lights -- the party’s over.”; actor: Terror on the 40th Floor, Sky Hei$t

1941 - Paul Edward Theroux
author: The Mosquito Coast, Millroy the Magician

1946 - Bob (Robert Jose) ‘Bull’ Watson
baseball: Houston Astros [all-star: 1973, 1975], Boston Red Sox, NY Yankees [World Series: 1981], Atlanta Braves

1947 - Bunny Livingston Wailer (Neville O’Riley)
musician: percussion, singer, songwriter: group: Bob Marley and the Wailers: Simmer Down, Rude Boy; solo: LPs: Blackheart Man, Protest, Sings the Wailers

1950 - Ken (George Kenneth) Griffey Sr.
baseball: Cincinnati Reds [World Series: 1975, 1976/all-star: 1976, 1977, 1980], NY Yankees, Atlanta Braves, Seattle Mariners; father of Ken Griffey Jr.; the first father-son combination to play in the major leagues at the same time

1951 - Steven Seagal
actor: Executive Decision, Under Siege series, On Deadly Ground, Out for Justice, Marked for Death, Hard to Kill, Above the Law

1954 - Peter MacNicol
actor: Dracula: Dead and Loving It, Addams Family Values, Ghostbusters 2, Sophie’s Choice, Dragon Slayer, Chicago Hope, The Powers that Be

1960 - Brian Setzer
musician: guitar, singer: The Stray Cats: Rock This Town, Stray Cat Strut, Runaway Boys.


Chart Toppers
April 10th.


1948 Manana - Peggy Lee
Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
(You’ve Got) The Magic Touch - The Platters
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Suspicion - Terry Stafford
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 A Horse with No Name - America
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Working My Way Back to You/Forgive Me, Girl - Spinners
Call Me - Blondie
Sugar Daddy - Bellamy Brothers

1988 Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car - Billy Ocean
Out of the Blue - Debbie Gibson
Devil Inside - INXS
Famous Last Words of a Fool - George Strait


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
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Friday, April 11, 2008
BARBERSHOP QUARTET DAY.



The SPEBSQSA (Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America) was founded on this day in 1938 by 26 singing, striped-shirted gentlemen. Now we know that’s 6½ quartets worth, but that’s what it took to get the organization humming. So, let’s head for the barbershop and ask for a “shave & a haircut, two bits!” or a refrain of Sweet Adeline.

By the way, Sweet Adeline, the love song that became a favorite of barbershop quartets, was written in 1903 by Richard Gerard and Henry Armstrong; and there really was a sweet Adeline. She was opera singer Adelina Patti.

Today, female barbershop quartets are called Sweet Adelines.

All together now, let’s harmonize. Hummmm.

More reading here.

Events
April 11th.


1803 - A twin-screw propeller steamboat was patented by John Stevens. The boat was 25 feet long and four feet wide.

1876 - The stenotype was patented by John C. Zachos of New York City. And then, he invented the stenographer...

1921 - The first live sports event on radio took place this day over KDKA radio. Pittsburgh sports writer, Florent Gibson, gave an account of the action in the lightweight boxing match between Johnny Ray and Johnny Dundee.

1940 - Andrew Ponzi of New York set a world’s record in a New York pocket billiards tournament. Ponzi ran 127 balls straight. Eight-ball in the side pocket, pal...

1943 - Nick Carter, Master Detective debuted on Mutual radio. The show was based on a New York Weekly character who was first introduced in 1886.

1947 - Jackie Robinson became the first black player in major-league history when he played in an exhibition game for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1956 - Elvis Presley reached the top spot on the Billboard music chart with his first double-sided hit. The disk featured Heartbreak Hotel and I Was the One. The RCA Victor record stayed at number one for eight weeks. Elvis also made the country and R&B charts, as well.

1961 - Carl Yastrzemski replaced Ted Williams in left field for the Boston Red Sox. The ‘Yaz’ was just 21 years old and had but two years experience in the minor leagues when he was called. In his first at-bat, he got a hit off Kansas City’s Ray Herbert. Yastrzemski retired in 1984, having played his entire major-league career in a Boston Red Sox uniform.

1961 - Bob Dylan made his professional singing debut in Greenwich Village. He sang Blowin’ in the Wind.

1962 - The New York Mets played their first regular season game. The team, managed by Casey Stengel, lost its first ten games. The St. Louis Cardinals won by a score of 11-4 -- prompting Stengel to say, before a group of reporters and players, “Can anyone here play this game?”

1965 - For the second time, Jack Nicklaus won the Masters golf title. He shot a par 271. Runners-up in a tie for second place were Arnold Palmer and Gary Player. It was the first time the ‘Big Three’ finished 1, 2, 3 in a tournament.

1981 - Wedding bells chimed for guitarist, Eddie Van Halen and actress, Valerie Bertinelli of One Day at a Time (CBS-TV). The lovely couple was married in Los Angeles, California. Van Halen, who is so cool that his group is named after him, was born in Nijmegen, The Netherlands and moved to Pasadena, CA in 1968. David Lee Roth was a member of the group, as was rocker, Sammy Hagar, who replaced Roth in 1985. The group was founded in 1974. On the Van Halen hit list, these toe tappers: Jump, Dance the Night Away, (Oh) Pretty Woman, Why Can’t This Be Love, Dreams and When It’s Love.

1983 - There were so many outstanding films in 1982, that the members of the Academy must have had a real struggle making up their minds in time for this night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Somehow, decisions were made and the 55th Annual Academy Awards ceremonies proceeded with hosts Liza Minnelli, Dudley Moore, Richard Pryor, and Walter Matthau. Those who voted for Best Picture had to choose between E.T.: the Extra-Terrestrial, Missing, Tootsie, The Verdict and Gandhi. Gandhi (Richard Attenborough, producer) was the winner of this Oscar and seven more including Best Director Richard Attenborough; Best Actor Ben Kingsley; Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Stuart Craig, Robert W. Laing, Michael Seirton); Best Cinematography (Ronnie Taylor, Billy Williams); Best Costume Design (Bhanu Athaiya, John Mollo); Best Film Editing (John Bloom); Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (John Briley). Believe it or not there were some Oscars leftover for other deserving folks. The Best Actress golden statuette was awarded to Meryl Streep for Sophie’s Choice; while Jessica Lange received her Best Supporting Actress award for Tootsie and Louis Gossett, Jr. picked up his Best Supporting Actor award for An Officer and a Gentleman. An Officer and a Gentleman was honored again for Best Music/Song: Up Where We Belong (Jack Nitzsche and Buffy Sainte-Marie [music], Will Jennings [lyrics], with Victor/Victoria winning the category of Best Music/Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score (Henry Mancini, Leslie Bricusse). Poltergeist, Annie, Rocky III, Blade Runner, Das Boot, Diner, The World According to Garp were also among the nominees at this Oscar celebration. We told you the voters must have had a difficult time voting!!!

1984 - The Detroit Pistons beat the Philadelphia 76ers 126-113 in a National Basketball Association game. It marked the first time the Pistons were able to defeat the 76ers at the Spectrum in Philly since November 2, 1974, a span of 22 games.

1986 - Kellogg’s of Battle Creek, MI stopped its 80-year tradition of tours of the breakfast-food plant on this day, saying that company secrets were at risk with spies from other cereal manufacturers.

1988 - Cher was sure moonstruck at this the 60th Annual Academy Awards at LA’s Shrine Auditorium. And as well she should have been. After all, she won the Oscar for Best Actress (Moonstruck), over the likes of Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, Sally Kirkland, and Holly Hunter. Moonstruck struck gold again as Olympia Dukakis picked up the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress, and John Patrick Shanley won for Best Writing/Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen. Almost all of the other awards (9) that evening were won by The Last Emperor (Jeremy Thomas, producer) including Best Picture, and Best Director (Bernardo Bertolucci), except for Michael Douglas who received the Best Actor award for his performance in Wall Street, Sean Connery for his Best Supporting Actor role in The Untouchables, and Dirty Dancing which had the winning Music/Song, (I’ve Had) The Time of My Life (music: Frank Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz, lyrics: Frank Previte). Funny man Chevy Chase hosted the fun-filled event. Note: The Last Emperor won in every category in which it was nominated.


Birthdays
April 11th.


1864 - Lillie P. Bliss
founder [with 2 other women] of New York City’s Museum of Modern Art; died in 1931

1893 - Lou Holtz
comedian, actor: Follow the Leader [1930], School for Romance [1934], When Do We Eat? [1934]; died Sep 22, 1980

1899 - Percy Julian
scientist: developer of synthetic progesterone, inexpensive production method to produce cortisone, a drug to treat glaucoma, chemical foam to smother oil fires; died Apr 19, 1975

1907 - Paul Douglas
actor: The Mating Game, Panic in the Streets, Executive Suite, This Could be the Night, The Gamma People; died Sep 11, 1959

1908 - Jane Bolin
attorney: first black woman graduate of Yale School of Law; first black, female judge

1912 - John Levy
jazz musician: bass: played with George Shearing quintet

1913 - Oleg Cassini
fashion designer

1921 - Dorothy Shay (Sims)
‘The Park Avenue Hillbilly’: singer: Feudin’ and Fightin’; actress: Comin’ Round the Mountain; died Oct 22, 1978

1922 - Ralph Blaze
guitarist: played with Stan Kenton

1928 - Ethel Kennedy (Skakel)
widow of slain U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy

1931 - Johnny Sheffield
actor: Tarzan Finds a Son, Tarzan’s Secret Treasure, Tarzan’s New York Adventure

1932 - Joel Grey (Katz)
Tony & Academy award-winning actor: Cabaret [1967 & 1972]; singer, dancer: Yankee Doodle Dandy, Buffalo Bill & the Indians, Kafka; actress Jennifer Grey’s father

1939 - Louise Lasser
actress: Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex [But Were Afraid to Ask], Frankenhooker, Rude Awakening, The Night We Never Met, Slither

1944 - Joe Beauchamp
football: Univ. of Iowa, SD Chargers

1947 - Peter Riegert
actor: The Mask, Oscar, Crossing Delancey, Local Hero, National Lampoon’s Animal House, Middle Ages

1950 - Bill Irwin
actor: Stepping Out, Scenes from a Mall, Hot Shots!, My Blue Heaven, Eight Men Out, Popeye; choreographer: The Regard of Flight

1951 - Steve George
football: Univ. of Houston, St. Louis Cardinals

1951 - Sid Monge
baseball: pitcher: California Angels, Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1979], Philadelphia Phillies, SD Padres, Detroit Tigers

1956 - Neville Staple
singer: group: The Specials: Gangsters, A Message to You Rudy, Too Much Too Young, Ghost Town

1958 - Stuart (William) Adamson
musician: guitar, singer: group: Big Country: Harvest Home, Fields of Fire, In a Big Country, Chance, Wonderland, East of Eden, Where the Rose is Sown; died Dec 16, 2001

1966 - Lisa Stansfield
singer, songwriter: All Around the World, You Can’t Deny It, This is the Right Time

1970 - Delroy Pearson
singer: group: Five Star: System Addict, Find the Time, Rain or Shine.


Chart Toppers
April 11th.


1949 Cruising Down the River - The Blue Barron Orchestra (vocal: ensemble)
Sunflower - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The Skylarks)
Red Roses for a Blue Lady - Vaughn Monroe
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
All Shook Up - Elvis Presley
Party Doll - Buddy Knox
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 I’m Telling You Now - Freddie & The Dreamers
The Birds and the Bees - Jewel Akens
Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders
King of the Road - Roger Miller

1973 The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia - Vicki Lawrence
Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye) - Gladys
Knight & The Pips
Ain’t No Woman (Like the One I’ve Got) - Four Tops
Super Kind of Woman - Freddie Hart & The Heartbeats

1981 Kiss on My List - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
You’re the Reason God Made Oklahoma - David Frizzell & Shelly West

1989 The Look - Roxette
She Drives Me Crazy - Fine Young cannibals
Like a Prayer - Madonna
I’m No Stranger to the Rain - Keith Whitley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #445  
Old 04-11-2008, 11:00 PM
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Saturday, April 12, 2008
ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK DAY (AND NIGHT).




Bill Haley and His Comets recorded Rock Around the Clock for Decca Records on this day in 1954. The song was recorded at the Pythian Temple, “a big, barnlike building with great echo,” in New York City. Rock Around the Clock was formally released a month later.

Most rock historians feel the tune, featured in the 1955 film Blackboard Jungle, ushered in the era of rock ’n’ roll. It hit number one on June 29, 1955 and stayed there for eight weeks, remaining on the charts for a total of 24 weeks.

Rock Around the Clock was not Haley’s first recording, however. He had waxed three other songs, all for Decca: Shake, Rattle and Roll, Dim, Dim the Lights, and Mambo Rock. And, through 1974, Haley and his group charted 14 hits, including, See You Later, Alligator from 1956. Rock Around the Clock was re-released in 1974. On its second run it made it to number 30 on the pop charts.

Haley died of a heart attack in Harlingen, TX on February 9, 1981. He was posthumously awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1982 for Rock Around the Clock. The record has now sold over 25,000,000 copies.

Clicky here, and here, and here too.

Events
April 12th.


1799 - Phineas Pratt patented the comb cutting machine -- a “machine for making combs.”

1833 - Charles Gaylor patented the fireproof safe in New York City. The safes are widely used to protect everything from priceless art to sensitive computer software. Some safes can burn at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour and the contents will still be as cool as a cucumber. Other units can sustain heat up to 400-500 degrees for about the same time without damaging the valuable contents within.

1847 - Yung Wing, one of several Chinese students to arrive in America this day, went on to become the first student from China to graduate from Yale University [1854].

1877 - James Alexander Tyng, while playing a baseball game in Lynn, MA, became the first ballplayer to wear a catcher’s mask.

1892 - Voters in Lockport, NY became the first in the U.S. to use voting machines.

1905 - The Hippodrome opened in New York City with the gala musical revue, A Yankee Circus on Mars. Realize please, that this extraordinary event was done without the help of even one hippo...

1932 - The thrill-comedy, Joe Palooka, which would also be a popular comic strip, made its debut on CBS radio.

1939 - One of the classic theme songs of the Big Band era was recorded for Decca. Woody Herman’s orchestra recorded Woodchopper’s Ball.

1955 - The polio vaccine of Dr. Jonas Salk was termed “safe, effective and potent” by the University of Michigan Polio Vaccine Evaluation Center.

1963 - Bob Dylan appeared in his first solo concert at Town Hall in New York City.

1964 - Arnold Palmer won his fourth Masters title and became the first golfer to make career earnings of $506,496.84. We haven’t a clue where the 84 cents came from.

1964 - Philadelphia singer Chubby Checker married former Miss World, the Dutch-born beauty Catharina Lodders.

1967 - Jim Brown made his TV acting debut in Cops and Robbers on the NBC show I Spy, starring Bill Cosby and Robert Culp. I Spy aired from 1965 through 1968. The primary characters, Cosby and Culp, were secret agents posing as a top-notch tennis star and his trainer-companion. I Spy was the first television series to co-star a black actor.

1969 - Lucy and Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts made the cover of Saturday Review.

1984 - Challenger astronauts made the first satellite repair in orbit by returning a healthy Solar Max satellite to space. The orbiting sun watcher had been circling the Earth for three years with all circuits dead before repairs were made.

1985 - Federal inspectors declared that four animals of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus were not unicorns, as the circus said, but goats with horns which had been surgically implanted. The circus was ordered to quit advertising the fake unicorns as anything else but goats. We assure you that no animals are harmed in the production of Those Were the Days and we use only first-rate, genuine unicorns.

1985 - Senator Joseph ‘Jake’ Garn became the first space politician as he lifted off this day from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

1987 - Larry Mize, 28, hit a miracle shot -- a 140-foot chip -- to win the Masters golf title in Augusta, GA. Mize defeated Greg Norman and Severiano Ballesteros in a playoff.


Birthdays
April 12th.


1777 - Henry Clay
‘The Great Pacificator’: U.S. Secretary of State under John Quincy Adams; three time unsuccessful candidate for president of U.S.: “I would rather be right than president.”; died June 29, 1852

1904 - Lily (Alice) Pons
soprano singer, actress: I Dream Too Much, That Girl from Paris; died Feb 13, 1976

1916 - Russ Garcia
musician, composer, orchestra leader: Waiter, Make Mine Blues [w/Anita O’Day]; Royal Wedding Suite [w/Oscar Peterson]

1923 - Ann Miller (Lucille Ann Collier)
actress, dancer: Easter Parade, Sugar Babies, You Can’t Take It with You, Hit the Deck, Kiss Me Kate, On the Town, Room Service, Lovely to Look At; died Jan 22, 2004

1926 - Jane Withers
actress: Captain Newman, M.D., Giant, The Farmer Takes a Wife, Bright Eyes, TV commercials: Josephine the plumber

1931 - Billy (Richard) Vaughn
musician, orchestra leader: Melody of Love, The Shifting, Whispering Sands, Sail along Silver Moon; baritone singer with The Hilltoppers; music director: Dot Records; died Sep 26, 1991

1932 - Tiny Tim (aka Darry Dover, Larry Love) (Herbert Khaury)
ukulele playing, falsetto singer: Tiptoe Through the Tulips, Sonny Boy; film: You Are What You Eat, TV: Laugh In; died Nov 30, 1996

1933 - Charlie (Charles Richard) Lau
baseball: Detroit Tigers, Milwaukee Braves, Baltimore Orioles, KC Athletics, Atlanta Braves; died Mar 18, 1984

1938 - Judy Lynn
country singer: Footsteps of a Fool; entertainer: Las Vegas; The Judy Lynn Show; Snake Valley Jamboree Queen [1952]; U.S. Champion Yodeler [1953]; Miss Idaho [1955]

1940 - Woody (Woodrow Thompson) Fryman
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1968], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos [all-star: 1976], Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs

1940 - Herbie Han****
Oscar-winning jazz/fusion musician, composer of original score: Round Midnight [1986]; TV score: Rockschool; singles: Riot, Cantaloupe Island, Rockit, Dolphin’s Dance

1944 - Terry (Walter) Harmon
baseball: Philadelphia Phillies

1944 - John Kay (Joachim Krauledat)
guitarist, vocalist: group: Steppenwolf: Born To Be Wild, Magic Carpet Ride, Rock Me

1946 - Ed O’Neill
actor: Married......with Children, Little Giants, Wayne’s World, Deliverance, Dragnet [2003]

1947 - Dan Lauria
actor: The Wonder Years, Amazing Grace, In the Line of Duty: Ambush in Waco, Stakeout

1947 - David Letterman
TV host & comedian: Late Night with David Letterman

1949 - Scott Turow
author: Presumed Innocent, The Burden of Proof

1950 - ‘Chip’ James Earl Carter III
son of 39th U.S. President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Roslyn Carter

1950 - David Cassidy
actor: The Partridge Family, Spirit of ’76, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; singer: Cherish, I Think I Love You; son of actors: Jack Cassidy, Evelyn Ward

1951 - Alex Briley
singer: group: The Village People: YMCA

1952 - Reuben Gant
football: Oklahoma State Univ., Buffalo Bills

1956 - Andy Garcia
actor: When a Man Loves a Woman, A Show of Force, The Godfather: Part 3, The Untouchables, Blue Skies Again

1957 - Vince Gill
Grammy Award-winning singer: When Love Finds You [1994], I Still Believe in You [1992], When I Call Your Name [1990], Restless [w/Steve Wariner and Ricky Skaggs] [1991]; Grammy Award-winning musician: guitar: Red Wing [w/Asleep at the Wheel] [1993]; songwriter: If It Weren’t for Him [w/Roseanne Cash]; groups: Bluegrass Alliance, Sundance, The Cherry Bombs, Pure Prairie League

1958 - Will Sergeant
musician: guitar: groups: Echo & the Bunnymen: Pictures on My Wall, Rescue; Electrafixion: LPs: Zephyr, Burned

1971 - Shannen Doherty
actress: Beverly Hills 90210, Our House, Little House on the Prairie, Night Shift, Heathers

1979 - Claire Danes
actress: How to Make an American Quilt, Home for the Holidays, Little Women, My So Called Life, Law & Order, The Mod Squad [1999]


Chart Toppers
April 12th.


1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
Peter Cottontail - Gene Autry
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 Tequila - The Champs
He’s Got the Whole World (In His Hands) - Laurie London
Book of Love - The Monotones
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Daydream - The Lovin’ Spoonful
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 Sunshine on My Shoulders - John Denver
Hooked on a Feeling - Blue Swede
Bennie & The Jets - Elton John
A Very Special Love Song - Charlie Rich

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Make a Move on Me - Olivia Newton-John
Big City - Merle Haggard

1990 Love Will Lead You Back - Taylor Dayne
I’ll Be Your Everything - Tommy Page
All Around the World - Lisa Stansfield
Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart - Randy Travis


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
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  #446  
Old 04-12-2008, 11:00 PM
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ShadowThomas ShadowThomas is offline
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104th. day of 2008 - 262 remaining.

Sunday, April 13, 2008
SCRABBLE DAY.



For all of you who can spend hour, upon hour, trying to use up all of your letters for the fifty-point bonus while on a triple word score, this day is yours to celebrate. You’ll be celebrating Alfred Butts’ birthday. Alfred was born on this day in 1899. He grew up to become an architect, but lost his job during the Depression. While he wiled away the hours of unemployment, he invented a crossword puzzle word-game. He and his friends had a good time playing the game, but that’s as far as it went ... until one fateful day in 1952. Butts and friends were at a resort (he survived the Depression) and, as fate would have it, a Macy’s department store executive saw them playing their game. The executive took the game back to Macy’s where it became a successful sales item.

It wasn’t long before the game makers of Selchow & Richter caught wind of the habit-forming board game. They offered Butts three cents for every set they manufactured. Butts accepted and Scrabble went on the assembly line. Thirty-five laborers made Scrabble sets by the thousands ... six-thousand sets were coming off the line every week. Scrabble is still one of the best-selling game boards made. Now you can even play it on your computer.

Of his three-cents worth, Butts said, “One third went to taxes. I gave one third away, and the other third enabled me to have an enjoyable life.”

Thanks to Alfred Butts, we have had many, many hours of enjoyment. However, we still wish there were more ‘U’ tiles to go with those dastardly ‘Qs’.

More reading here, here, and here.

Events
April 13th.



1782 - Washington, North Carolina was incorporated as the first town to be named for -- take a guess -- George Washington. One of these days we’re going to add up all the places, towns and points of interest that are named after the first president of the U.S. Maybe we could have a contest -- the first person with the correct answer wins a set of wooden teeth...

1796 - The first known elephant (like, how would one NOT know it was an elephant?) to arrive in the United States, came to America. The elephant was from Bengal, India and entered the U.S.A. through New York City.

1916 - The first hybrid, seed corn was purchased -- for 15-cents a bushel -- by Samuel Ramsay of Jacobsburg, OH.

1940 - A record pole vault of 15 feet was made in Berkeley, CA by Cornelius Warmerdam. Sergei Bubka from the Ukraine doesn’t think much of this record. In 1994, he vaulted himself up and over at a height of 20 feet, 1¾ inches.

1940 - The first of the ‘Road’ movies with Bob Hope, Big Crosby and Dorothy Lamour opened at the Paramount Theatre in New York City. The film was The Road to Singapore.

1943 - The Thomas Jefferson Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. on this, the anniversary of Jefferson’s birth.

1954 - Hank Aaron debuted for the Milwaukee Braves. In his first ever major-league baseball game, Hammerin’ Hank went 0-for-5 against Cincinnati. Aaron’s first major-league homer came 10 days later.

1958 - Van Cliburn of Kilgore, TX earned 1st prize in the Soviet Union’s Tchaikovsky International Piano Contest in Moscow.

1961 - Carnival opened on Broadway at the Imperial Theatre in New York City. Anna Maria Alberghetti starred in the musical which ran for 719 performances.

1963 - Pete Rose got his first major-league hit for the Cincinnati Reds. Twenty one years later to this day, ‘Charlie Hustle’ collected his 4,000th hit. Rose was playing for Montreal when he achieved the feat. (See 1984.)

1964 - The 36th Annual Academy Awards ceremony proved to be a long evening for host Jack Lemmon and his audience at Los Angeles’ Santa Monica Civic Auditorium and those viewing on TV. We don’t know exactly how long the actual ceremonies were, but judging from the length of the films being honored, ‘long’ was the magic word. The five films nominated for Best Picture of 1963 averaged 159 minutes, including the two epics, Cleopatra (243 minutes) and How the West Was Won (165 minutes). Tom Jones (Tony Richardson, producer), which won the top prize, plus Best Director (Tony Richardson) Best Music/Score/Substantially Original (John Addison) and Best Writing/Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (John Osborne)was a mere two hours long. There were, however, a few average-length flicks that featured above-average, Oscar-winning performances: Best Actor: Sidney Poitier (Lilies of the Field); Best Actress: Patricia Neal and Best Supporting Actor: Melvyn Douglas (Hud); Best Supporting Actress: Margaret Rutherford (The V.I.P.s); and Best Music/Song: Call Me Irresponsible, James Van Heusen (music), Sammy Cahn (lyrics) from Papa’s Delicate Condition. Other marathon Oscar-winning movies of 1963: It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (188 minutes); America, America (174 minutes); Irma la Douce (147 minutes).

1972 - The first strike in the history of major-league baseball ended. Players had walked off the field 13 days earlier.

1980 - Broadway’s longest-running musical closed after eight years. Grease ran for 3,388 performances and earned $8 million. Though the-longest running musical on the Great White Way at the time, Grease was also the third longest-running Broadway show. Other shows in the top five included: The Defiant Ones and Life with Father, Oh! Calcutta, A Chorus Line and Fiddler on the Roof.

1981 - Janet Cook won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Things took a strange turn when she later said that her prize-winning story in The Washington Post was a fake. She made up the story and passed it off as truth. Her award was taken away and given instead to Teresa Carpenter of New York’s Village Voice.

1984 - The Montreal Expos welcomed Pete Rose to the team and he repaid the Expos’ faithful with a double against his former teammates, the Philadelphia Phillies. It was Rose’s 4,000th career hit. He is the only National League player to reach this milestone since Ty Cobb got 4,109 total hits with American League teams, Detroit and Philadelphia.

1985 - The Grand Ole Opry, a radio staple from Nashville for 60 years, came to TV. The Nashville Network presented the country music jamboree to some 22-million homes across the U.S.

1986 - Jack Nicklaus won his sixth Masters green jacket with a 9-under-par 279.


Birthdays
April 13th.



1743 - Thomas Jefferson
3rd U.S. President [1801-1809]; married to Martha Skelton [one son, five daughters]; nickname: Man of the People; died July 4, 1826

1852 - F. W. (Frank Winfield) Woolworth
merchant: created the five and ten cent store [1879 in Lancaster, PA]: headed F.W. Woolworth & Co. with over 1,000 stores, funded NY’s Woolworth Building; died Apr 8, 1919

1899 - Alfred M. Butts
architect, game inventor; died Apr 4, 1993; see Scrabble Day [above]

1906 - Samuel Beckett
author, critic, playwright: Waiting for Godot, The Unnameable, Eleutheria, Malone Dies, Malloy, Endgame; died Dec 22, 1989

1906 - Bud (Lawrence) Freeman
jazz musician: tenor sax: China Boy, Easy to Get, I’ve Found a New Baby, The Eel, Mr. Toad; died Mar 15, 1991

1907 - Harold Stassen
perennial U.S. Presidential candidate; governor of Minnesota; a member of President Eisenhower’s cabinet; one of the founders of the U.N.; died Mar 4, 2001

1909 - Eudora Welty
poet: Delta Wedding, Losing Battles, A Curtain of Green; quote: “The events in our lives happen in a sequence in time, but in their significance to ourselves they find their own order.”; Computer programmer Steve Dorner (Univ of Illinois,Urbana) created a freeware e-mail program in the late 1980s and dubbed it “Eudora”, which is one of the most popular e-mail readers used around the world, because of Welty’s short story "Why I Live at the P.O." (published in 1941); died July 23, 2001

1919 - Howard Keel (Harry Clifford Leek)
actor: Dallas; singer, actor: Oklahoma, Annie Get Your Gun, Show Boat, Lovely to Look At, Kiss Me Kate, Calamity Jane, Rose-Marie, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Deep in My Heart, Saratoga, No Strings; died Nov 7, 2004

1919 - Madalyn Murray O’Hair
author: Why I Am an Atheist; murdered: missing since Aug 1995, her body was found near Camp Wood TX Jan 28, 2001

1923 - Don Adams (Donald James Yarmy)
Emmy Award-winning actor: Get Smart [1966-1967, 1967-1968]; Back to the Beach, The Nude Bomb; died Sep 25, 2005

1925 - Jules Irving
actor: It Came from Beneath the Sea [aka Monster from Beneath the Sea]; died July 28, 1979

1928 - Teddy Charles (Theodore Charles Cohen)
vibraphonist, songwriter: Blue Greens; group: Teddy Charles Quintet; composer, arranger; worked w/modern jazz artists like Herbie Han****, John Coltrane

1929 - Marilynn Smith
golf: Univ. of Kansas: Kansas State Amateur champ [1946-1948], national collegiate title [1949]; 22 tournament victories/2 major championships [Titleholders: 1963, 1964]; LPGA founder/charter member, president [1958-1960]

1931 - Dan Gurney
auto racer: Indianapolis Speedway Hall of Famer; 1st driver to win all 4 major categories: Formula One, Indy Cars, NASCAR stock and sports cars; team owner: builds All-American Eagle

1935 - Lyle Waggoner
actor: The Carol Burnett Show, The Jimmie Rodgers Show, Wonder Woman, Dead Women in Lingerie

1937 - Edward Fox
actor: Gulliver’s Travels, The Dresser, Gandhi, The Mirror Crack’d, Force 10 from Navarone, The Big Sleep, A Bridge Too Far, The Day of the Jackal, Portrait of a Lady

1939 - Paul Sorvino
actor: Law and Order, Reds, Oh! God, The Day of the Dolphin, Dick Tracy, Goodfellas, A Touch of Class

1940 - Jose Napoles
Internatinal Boxing Hall of Famer: welterweight champ [1969, 1970]

1940 - Lester Chambers
singer, musician: harmonica: group: The Chambers Brothers: Time Has Come Today

1942 - Bill Conti
Academy Award-winning composer of scores: The Right Stuff [1983]; Dynasty, Falcon Crest, Inside Edition

1944 - Jack Casady
musician: bass: groups: KBC Band, Hot Tuna; Jefferson Airplane: It’s No Secret, Runnin’ Round this World, Somebody to Love, White Rabbit

1944 - Brian Pendleton
musician: guitar: group: The Pretty Things; died May 25, 2001

1945 - Tony Dow
actor: Leave It to Beaver, Back to the Beach, High School U.S.A., Death Scream

1946 - Al Green
singer, songwriter: Tired of Being Alone, Let’s Stay Together, You Ought to be with Me, Here I Am, Call Me

1950 - Ron Perlman
actor: Fluke, Double Exposure, Beauty and the Beast series, The Name of the Rose

1951 - Max Weinberg
musician: drummer: E Street Band; bandleader: The Max Weinberg 7 [Late Night with Conan O’Brien]

1951 - Peabo Bryson
singer: Underground Music, I Can Make It Better, Just Another Day, Do It with Feeling, Tonight I Celebrate My Love, If You’re Ever in My arms Again

1954 - Jimmy Destri
musician: Farfisa organ; group: Blondie: Picture This, Hanging on the Telephone, Sunday Girl, Heart of Glass, Call Me, The Tide is High, Rapture

1957 - Saundra Santiago
actress: Miami Vice, Beat Street

1963 - Garry Kasparov
World Chess Champion: international grand master

1970 - Rick Schroder
actor: NYPD Blue, Crimson Tide, Texas, Lonesome Dove, Hansel and Gretel, Earthling, The Champ, Silver Spoons.


Chart Toppers
April 13th.


1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill -Patti Page
Be My Love - Mario Lanza
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
Pink Shoe Laces - Dodie Stevens
(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I - Elvis Presley
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Happy Together - The Turtles
Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
Bernadette - Four Tops
Walk Through This World with Me - George Jones

1975 Philadelphia Freedom - The Elton John Band
Poetry Man - Phoebe Snow
(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song
- B.J. Thomas
Always Wanting You - Merle Haggard

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me - Culture Club
Hungry like the Wolf - Duran Duran
We’ve Got Tonight - Kenny Rogers & Sheena Easton

1991 I’ve Been Thinking About You - Londonbeat
You’re in Love - Wilson Phillips
Hold You Tight - Tara Kemp
Down Home - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #447  
Old 04-13-2008, 10:59 PM
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ShadowThomas ShadowThomas is offline
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Wink Part 1 of 2.

105th day of 2008 - 261 remaining.

Monday, April 14, 2008
FIRST LADY OF THE AMERICAN SCREEN DAY.


What a night this was back in 1969! All the egos and glamour of Hollywood were gathered together in one place for the annual Academy Awards presentation. All in the theatre and those watching the extravaganza on television could feel the electricity in the air as the envelope, announcing the Best Actress Award, was opened.

It was the 11th nomination for Katharine Hepburn, an academy record! And, the Oscar goes to ...

For the first time in the history of the Academy Awards, a tie resulted in two stars sharing the Best Actress Oscar. Barbra Streisand for her performance in Funny Girl had reached the top, only to share the honor with the ‘First Lady of the American Screen’, Katharine Hepburn for her starring role in The Lion in Winter.

Hepburn also broke the record that night as the only actress to win three Best Actress Oscars. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner awarded the previous year and Morning Glory [1932-33] were the other films. She was also only the third person to win two years in a row. Hepburn added a twelfth nomination and a fourth Oscar in 1981 for her performance in On Golden Pond with co-star Henry Fonda. She earned three of these awards after her sixtieth birthday.

There’s an old saying that goes something like this, “He who laughs last, laughs best.” Not all of Katharine Hepburn’s peers were admirers. After completing her first film (A Bill of Divorcement) in 1932, she told her lecherous, co-star John Barrymore that she would never act with him again. His reply, “Really, my dear? I didn’t know you ever had.” Hepburn, who had made her stage debut on Broadway in 1928, was reviewed by columnist Dorothy Parker for a 1933 performance as “running the gamut of emotions from A to B.” And, in 1938 she was labeled “box-office poison.” Obviously Hepburn has had the last laugh.

Her most memorable performances include Bringing Up Baby and The Philadelphia Story opposite Cary Grant; Woman of the Year, Adam’s Rib, Pat and Mike with co-star and significant other, Spencer Tracy; The African Queen with Humphrey Bogart and Suddenly Last Summer opposite Montgomery Clift. Long Day’s Journey into Night earned her a 1962 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress award.

From Broadway to Hollywood to television ... 1975 Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in her ABC Theatre performance, opposite Laurence Olivier, in Love Among the Ruins ... to literature ... two best-sellers, The Making of "The African Queen" or How I Went to Africa with Bogart, Bacall and Huston and Almost Lost My Mind and her autobiography, Me, Katharine Hepburn remains a star, the idol of independent, talented young women in their search for fame and fortune.

Click, click, and click.

Events
April 14th.


1865 - John Wilkes Booth, a well-known actor, was permitted upstairs at Ford’s Theatre. Thus, he gained access to U.S. President Abraham Lincoln’s private theatre box as Lincoln watched the performance of Our American Cousin. It was just after 10 p.m. when Booth, a Confederate sympathizer, shot Lincoln in the head. After shooting the President, Booth leaped to the stage below, shouting, “Sic semper tyrannis!” (“Thus always to tyrants!”, the state motto of Virginia.) He broke his leg in the fall but managed to escape the theatre (which was in Washington, D.C.), mount a horse, and flee to Virginia. Booth was hunted down and shot as he hid in a barn near Port Royal, Virginia. Lincoln died at 7:22 a.m. the next day.

1894 - The kinetoscope was demonstrated by its inventor, Thomas Alva Edison, in New York City. A viewer that held 50 feet of film -- about 13 seconds worth -- showed images of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill. The demonstration was actually called the first peep show, as one had to peep into the device to see what was on the film. Movies were not projected on a screen at that time.

1902 - J.C. (James Cash) Penney opened his first store -- in Kemmerer Wyoming. In partnership with Thomas M. Callahan and William Guy Johnson, Penney named the store Golden Rule. The dry goods and clothing store had a first-year profit of $8,514.36 on sales of $28,898.11.

1910 - The Philadelphia Athletics, under manager Connie Mack, played the Washington Senators in what became a most historic game. This game was not only the season opener; but also, the first time a United States President had thrown out the first ball. The president was William Howard Taft. The game was held in Washington, DC and appropriately, The Senators won 3-0. And so began a baseball tradition. Play ball!

1912 - “Up in the crows nest, Frederick Fleet was staring into the darkness. It was around 11:30 p.m. on a very odd calm moonless night when he noticed a black object immediately in their path, he knew it was ice!” The Royal Mail Steamship Titanic of the White Star Line struck an iceberg at approximately 11:40 p.m. The great ship, on its maiden voyage, sank just under three hours later. 1,517 passengers were lost at sea. (See TWtD, April 15.)

1912 - Frederick Rodman Law was a stunt man and became the first man to intentionally jump from the Brooklyn Bridge in New York without intending to take his own life. He was OK after the leap.

1935 - Babe Ruth played his first game for the National League in Fenway Park in Boston, MA. This time, he was playing for the Boston Braves, not his old Red Sox. Ruth was in his last year of pro ball in the major leagues. In this, his last season, Ruth played only 28 games, getting 13 hits and six home runs, before hanging up his spikes for good.

1941 - Hildegarde recorded the standard Darling Je Vous Aime Beaucoup on Decca Records. Hildegarde was the elegant singer with the long white gloves who was accompanied by the Harry Sosnik Orchestra. It took another 14 years, but Nat ‘King’ Cole turned the song into an even bigger hit, landing at number 7 on the pop music charts.

1956 - Ampex Corporation of Redwood City, CA demonstrated the first commercial magnetic tape recorder for sound and picture. The videotape machine had a price tag of $75,000. These early Ampex units were too large to fit in a small room. That’s back when bigger was better.

1958 - Pianist Van Cliburn was presented on national TV for the first time on NBC’s The Tonight Show with Jack Paar.

1958 - Laurie London reached the top spot on the music charts with He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands, knocking Perry Como’s Catch a Falling Star down a peg or two.

1960 - The musical Bye Bye Birdie opened at the Martin Beck Theatre in New York City. Chita Rivera and Dick Van Dyke starred in the Broadway show which ran for 607 performances.

1967 - Herman’s Hermits, featuring lead singer Peter Noone, went gold with the single, There’s a Kind of Hush. It was a two-sided hit, with the flip-side, No Milk Today, also receiving considerable play. Hush, however, was a top five song, while the ‘B’ side just made it into the top 40 at number 35.

1968 - Bob Goalby won the Masters Golf Tournament after Roberto DeVicenzo signed an incorrect scorecard. DeVicenzo signed for a score higher than his actual score on the 17th hole (a par 4 when he actually made a birdie 3). The rules say that you have to stick to the higher score, once you sign for it. The lower score would have pitted DeVicenzo against Goalby in a playoff match and who knows what might have happened? Ouch! On top of this, it was DeVicenzo’s 45th birthday, as well!

1969 - This was a night of firsts at the 41st Annual Academy Awards ceremony. For the first time, the happenings at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles were beamed to TV audiences worldwide. Appropriately, a foreign (British) film was honored as Best Picture: Oliver! (John Woolf, producer), which also won for Best Director (Carol Reed); Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (John Box, Terence Marsh, Vernon Dixon, Ken Muggleston); Best Sound (Shepperton SSD); Best Music/Score of a Musical Picture/Original or Adaptation (Johnny Green). And, for the first time, there was a tie for Best Actress. Barbra Streisand picked up her statuette for her starring role in Funny Girl, and for the second year in a row, Katharine Hepburn was honored as Best Actress, this time for her performance in The Lion in Winter. Other veteran actors received their first Oscars this night: Cliff Robertson for his Best Actor role in Charly; Jack Albertson for his Best Supporting Actor role in The Subject Was Roses and Ruth Gordon for her Best Supporting Actress role in Rosemary’s Baby. Even the Best Music/Song award was presented for the first time to Michel Legrand (music) and Alan and Marilyn Bergman (lyrics) for the song The Windmills of Your Mind from the The Thomas Crown Affair. Other great 1968 films that were Oscar-winners or nominees: 2001: A Space Odyssey; Chitty Chitty Bang Bang; For Love of Ivy; Planet of the Apes; Bullitt; The Odd Couple; Romeo and Juliet; The Producers; Rachel, Rachel.

1980 - Stan Mikita retired after 21 years with the Chicago Black Hawks of the NHL. His #21 jersey became the first Blackhawks number to be retired.

1980 - Kramer vs. Norma, Apocalypse vs. Jazz. That’s how the honors were divided at the 52nd Annual Academy Awards ceremony at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Johnny Carson was hosting quite a contest! But the Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role went to Melvyn Douglas for his performance in Being There. Was it going to be an upset? Being There was a long shot to win Best Picture and this was its first award all evening. All That Jazz had already won four of the golden statuettes and Apocalypse Now, two. Next, it was Meryl Streep who picked up the Best Supporting Actress Oscar and Dustin Hoffman, Best Actor, for their roles in Kramer vs. Kramer, making it a trio of Oscars for Kramer, so far. Then Norma Rae picked up two awards: Best Music/Song, It Goes like It Goes, David Shire (music), Norman Gimbel (lyrics) and Best Actress, Sally Field. But it was in the cards for Kramer vs. Kramer as it won for Best Director (Robert Benton), and then, Best Picture (Stanley R. Jaffe, producer). Going into the evening, All That Jazz and Kramer vs. Kramer each had nine Oscar nominations, Apocalypse Now had eight, and Norma Rae, four.

1985 - Bernhard Langer shot a 282 and won the Masters golf tournament. It was the West German’s first official year as a member of the PGA Tour.


Birthdays
April 14th.


1866 - Anne Sullivan (Macy)
‘The Miracle Worker’: famous for teaching the blind and deaf Helen Keller to read, write and speak; died Oct 20, 1936

1889 - Arnold (Joseph) Toynbee
historian, author: A Study of History, The Western Question in Greece and Turkey, The World and the West, Acquaintances, and Experiences; died Oct 22, 1975

1904 - Sir (Arthur) John Gielgud
Academy Award-winning [supporting] actor: Arthur [1981]; Emmy Award-winning actor: Masterpiece Theatre miniseries Summer’s Lease [1990-1991]; Becket, Chariots of Fire, The Elephant Man, Gandhi, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, A Man for All Seasons, Murder on the Orient Express, The Charge of the Light Brigade, War and Remembrance; died May 21, 2000

1923 - Roberto De Vicenzo
golf: champ: British Open [1967]; won 230 tournaments worldwide during career; see 1968 [above]

1924 - Shorty Rogers (Milton Rajonsky)
musician: trumpet, bandleader, songwriter: Keen and Peachy, Martians Go Home, Sweetheart of Sigmund Freud; composer, arranger: film: That Certain Girl; died Nov 7, 1994

1925 - Rod Steiger (Rodney Stephen Steiger)
Academy Award-winning actor: In the Heat of the Night [1967]; On the Waterfront, The Pawnbroker, Dr. Zhivago, The Longest Day, Back Water, In Pursuit of Honor, Mars Attacks!; died July 9, 2002

1927 - Gloria Jean (Schoonover)
actress: Copacabana, The Ladies Man

1930 - Bradford Dillman
actor: Compulsion, The Bridge at Remagen, The Way We Were, Court-Martial, King’s Crossing, Falcon Crest

1930 - Jay Robinson
actor: Sinatra, Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex [But Were Afraid to Ask], My Man Godfrey, The Virgin Queen, Demetrius and the Gladiators, The Robe

1935 - Joan Darling (Kugell)
actress: The President’s Analyst, The Two Worlds of Jenny Logan, Sunnyside

1935 - Marty (Richard Martin) Keough
baseball: Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, Cincinnati Reds, Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs

1935 - Loretta Lynn
country singer: Coal Miner’s Daughter, I’m a Honky-Tonk Girl, One’s on the Way, The Pill; 1st woman to earn the CMA’s Entertainer of the Year award; named ACM Artist of the Decade [1979]

1936 - Bobby Nichols
golfer: PGA Champion [1964]

1941 - Julie Christie
actress: Dr. Zhivago, Petulia, Shampoo, Separate Tables, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Fahrenheit 451

1941 - Pete (Peter Edward) Rose
‘Charlie Hustle’: baseball: Cincinnati Reds [Rookie of the Year: 1963/all-star: 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1985/World Series: 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1973/manager: 1986-89]; Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982/World Series: 1980, 1983], Montreal Expos; banished from baseball [1989] for alleged gambling on major-league games; lifetime totals: hits: 4,256, games: 3,562, at bats: 14,053, lifetime batting average: .303

1942 - Dick Brooks
auto racer: NASCAR legend

1945 - Ritchie Blackmore
musician: guitar: solo: Getaway, Little Brown Jug, LP: Rainbow; groups: Deep Purple: Black Night, Strange Kind of Woman, Fireball, Smoke on the Water; LPs: Deep Purple in Rock, Made in Japan, Who Do We Think We Are?, Machine Head; Rainbow: Since You’ve Been Gone, All Night Long, I Surrender, Stone Cold, LPs: Rainbow Rising, Straight Between the Eyes, Bent Out of Shape

1948 - Larry Ferguson
musician: keyboards: group: Hot Chocolate: Emma, Disco Queen, You Sexy Thing, So You Win Again,\ I’ll Put You Back Together Again, Every 1’s a Winner, Girl Crazy, Chances

1949 - Dennis Bryon
musician: drums: groups: Amen Corner; Bee Gees: Jive Talkin’, Fanny [Be Tender with My Love], How Can You Mend a Broken Heart, How Deep is Your Love

1949 - John Shea
Emmy Award-winning actor: Baby M [1988]; WIOU, Lois & Clark - The New Adventures of Superman, Backstreet Justice, Honey, I Blew Up the Kid, Small Sacrifices, A Case of Deadly Force, Nativity

1968 - Anthony Michael Hall
actor: The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, National Lampoon’s Vacation, Edward Scissorhands; comedian: Saturday Night Live.
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Chart Toppers
April 14th.


1944 It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
I Love You - Bing Crosby
Besame Mucho - The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra (vocal: Bob Eberly & Kitty
Kallen
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Tell Me Why - The Four Aces
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Greenfields - The Brothers Four
Mama - Connie Francis
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Young Girl - The Union Gap
Cry like a Baby - The Box Tops
You are My Treasure - Jack Greene

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
’Til I Can Make It on My Own - Tammy Wynette

1984 Footloose - Kenny Loggins
Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Thank God for the Radio - The Kendalls


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
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106th day of 2008 - 260 remaining.

Tuesday, April 15, 2008
UNSINKABLE? DAY.


The ‘unsinkable’ luxury liner, Titanic, sank at 2:27a.m. on this day in 1912. The largest passenger vessel in the world went under off the coast of Newfoundland two and one-half hours after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City. A young David Sarnoff, later of RCA and NBC, relayed telegraph messages to advise relatives on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean of the 700+ survivors. 1,517 lives were lost at sea. One account claimed that lifeboats weren’t operable and those that were, quickly filled with male passengers and crew members, instead of the traditional women and children first. Reports indicate that the captain of the Titanic, most of the crew and the ship’s orchestra remained on board as the huge luxury liner slid into the icy Atlantic. Still another report, from a survivor, indicated that as the great ship was going down to a watery grave, the orchestra played Nearer My God to Thee.

Many movies and documentaries about the monumental disaster have been filmed over the years. However, none had the exacting data gleaned by scientists from the 1986 expedition aboard Atlantis II. Dr. Robert Ballard headed a crew and a robot named Jason in a descent to the deck of the Titanic aboard Alvin, a submersible craft. They returned with information and photos that challenged and verified stories from the past. After years of studying the facts, the 1997 Academy Award-winning film, Titanic, recreated the ship to the tiniest detail including the design on the elegant china. Although the film’s love story is fictitious, the true tragedy of the Titanic can now be seen by the world some eight decades later.

More reading on the subject here, here, and here.

Events
April 15th.



1794 - Courrier Francais became the first French daily newspaper to be published in the U.S.

1865 - Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States of America, died at 7:22 a.m. Lincoln had been shot in the back of the head the previous evening while attending a performance of Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The assassin, John Wilkes Booth, escaped, only to be hunted down and shot to death. Lincoln was carried to a boarding house across the street from the theatre. He never regained consciousness.

1923 - Insulin became available for general use on this day. It was first discovered in 1922. Today, insulin is used daily in the treatment of diabetes. It is extracted from the pancreas of sheep, oxen and by other means, including synthesization in the laboratory. Insulin, a natural and vital hormone for carbohydrate metabolism in the body, is manufactured by the pancreas. An overabundance of insulin causes insulin shock and leads to a variety of symptoms, including coma.

1923 - Dr. Lee DeForest’s Phonofilm, the first sound-on-sound film, motion picture, was demonstrated for a by-invitation-only audience at the Rivoli Theatre in New York City. The guests saw The Gavotte, a man and woman dancing to old-time music and The Serenade, four musicians who played on wind, percussion and string instruments.

1927 - Serge Koussevitsky directed the Boston Symphony in the first performance of Frederick Converse’s symphony, Flivver Ten Million, a salute to the ‘Tin Lizzie’ automobile.

1934 - Dagwood and Blondie Bumstead welcomed a baby boy, Alexander, to the comic strip, Blondie. The child would be nicknamed, Baby Dumpling.

1947 - Jackie Robinson played his first major-league baseball game (he had played exhibition games previously) for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He went 0-for-4 against Boston. Robinson did get on base due to an error and scored the winning run in a 5-3 win for the Dodgers.

1955 - “Two all beef patties...” This is the anniversary of McDonald’s. Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald’s -- in Des Plaines, IL. Kroc began his career by selling milk shake machines. Among his first customers were the McDonald brothers from Southern California. After selling them several machines and watching the efficiency of their drive-in restaurant, Kroc bought the rights to market the brothers’ good fortune and hired them to work for him. On his first day of business, sales of 15-cent hamburgers and 10-cent French fries totaled $366.12. Thirty years later, McDonald’s grossed a whopping $8.6 billion annually. There is no telling how many burgers have been served at McDonald’s. They stopped counting years ago, saying, “Billions and billions served.” The rest is McHistory with McDonald’s a common sight around the world. The first McDonald’s is no longer. It was torn down to build a newer McDonald’s restaurant across the street. The firm’s worldwide headquarters are located in Oak Brook, IL, the home of ‘Hamburger University’. Have a Big Mac today! You deserve a break.

1956 - The worlds’ first all-color, TV station was dedicated -- in Chicago, IL. It was named WNBQ-TV and is now WMAQ-TV.

1956 - General Motors announced that the first, free piston automobile had been developed.

1971 - George C. Scott refused the Oscar for his Best Actor performance in Patton at the 43rd Annual Academy Awards ceremony at LA’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. He had previously told reporters that he did not want the honor, saying (after the votes had been cast and tallied), “It is degrading to have actors in competition with each other.” Scott called the Oscar ceremony, “a two-hour meat parade, a public display with contrived suspense for economic reasons.” Others who did accept the golden statuette as recognition for their works that evening include: Glenda Jackson, Best Actress (Women in Love); Helen Hayes, Best Supporting Actress (Airport); John Mills, Best Supporting Actor (Ryan’s Daughter); Fred Karlin (music), Robb Royer and James Griffin (lyrics), Best Music/Song, For All We Know from Lovers and Other Strangers; and Franklin J. Schaffner, Best Director (Patton) ... Patton (Frank McCarthy, producer) also received the Best Picture honors. Other notable flicks from 1970 (some Oscar winners, some not): Five Easy Pieces, Love Story, MASH, Tora! Tora! Tora!, Diary of a Mad Housewife.

1973 - The richest women’s golf tournament held (to that day) was won by Mickey Wright. She won the $25,000 first prize in the Colgate-Dinah Shore Golf Classic in Palm Springs, CA.

1985 - Ozzie Smith was awarded a $2-million annual contract by the St. Louis Cardinals. Smith became the richest infielder in baseball with the contract.

1985 - ‘Marvelous’ Marvin Hagler helped Thomas the ‘Hit Man’ Hearns go nighty-night a littler earlier than expected, with a third round knockout to retain the world middleweight boxing title. Some have called the fight, “the greatest three rounds in boxing history.”


Birthdays
April 15th.



1452 - Leonardo da Vinci
artist: Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, The Virgin of the Rocks, The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne; died May 2, 1519

1741 - Charles Willson Peale
artist: portrait painter, primarily of colonial and American Revolutionary War figures; died Feb 22, 1827

1843 - Henry James
author: The Turn of the Screw, The Wings of the Dove, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors; died Feb 28, 1916

1889 - Thomas Benton
artist: regionalism: Cave Spring, Jesse James, mural of Indiana; died in 1975

1894 - Bessie Smith
‘Empress of the Blues’: blues singer: sang with Louis Armstrong in 1925: early version of St. Louis Blues, My Man’s Blues, Dixie Flyer Blues, I Ain’t Got Nobody, A Good Man is Hard to Find, Poor Man’s Blues; died Sep 26, 1937

1917 - Hans Conried
actor: My Friend Irma, Bus Stop, Oh! God: Book 2, Tut & Tuttle, The Monster that Challenged the World; host: Fractured Flickers TV Series; died Jan 5, 1982

1920 - Jim Timmens
Grammy Award-winning composer: Aren’t You Glad You’re You [1977: Best Recording For Children, w/Christopher Cerf]; jazz musician, musical director of New York’s Radio City Music Hall

1922 - Harold Washington
mayor: Chicago: instrumental in tearing apart Chicago’s Democratic Machine of the Richard Daley administration; died Nov 25, 1987

1930 - Herb Pomeroy
musician: trumpet: teacher at Berklee in Boston, bandleader; directed radio Malaysia Orchestra

1933 - Elizabeth Montgomery
actress: Bewitched, Robert Montgomery Presents; died May 18, 1995

1933 - Roy Clark
musician: guitar, banjo; CMA Entertainer of the Year [1973], Comedian of the Year [1970, 1971, 1972], co-host: Hee Haw; country singer: Tips of My Fingers, Through the Eyes of a Fool, Yesterday, When I Was Young, Come and Live with Me, Somewhere Between Love and Tomorrow, Thank God and Greyhound [You’re Gone]

1933 - Mel Kenyon
auto racer: legendary NAMARS champ

1937 - Bob Luman
singer: Let’s Think About Living, Every Day I Have to Cry Some, The Pay Phone, Proud of You Baby; died Dec 27, 1978

1938 - Claudia Cardinale
actress: The Pink Panther, Once Upon a Time in the West, Jesus of Nazareth, Henry the IV, A Man in Love

1940 - Willie (William Henry) Davis
baseball: LA Dodgers [World Series: 1963, 1965, 1966/all-star: 1971, 1973], Montreal Expos, SL Cardinals, Texas Rangers, SD Padres, California Angels

1940 - Woody (Woodrow Thompson) Fryman
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1968], Detroit Tigers, Montreal Expos [all-star: 1976], Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs

1942 - Walt Hazzard
basketball: 1964 Olympic Gold Medalist: U.S. team; LA Lakers, Seattle Supersonics, Atlanta Hawks, Buffalo Braves, Golden State Warriors; UCLA coach

1942 - Julie Sommars
actress: Sex and the Single Parent, Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo

1945 - Ted Sizemore
baseball: St. Louis Cardinals; National League Rookie of the Year: LA Dodgers 2B [1969]

1950 - Dick (Richard Louis) Sharon
baseball: Detroit Tigers, SD Padres

1950 - Amy Wright
actress: The Scarlet Letter, Final Verdict, Crossing Delancey, The Accidental Tourist, Wise Blood, Breaking Away, The Amityville Horror, The Deer Hunter

1951 - Heloise (Ponce Kiah Marchelle Heloise Cruse Evans)
newspaper columnist, writer: Hints from Heloise; she took over the Heloise empire after her mother, the original Heloise, died in 1977

1957 - Evelyn Ashford
track athlete: 4-time Olympic gold medalist, a shared record for most gold medals won by a woman: 100 meters [1984], 4 x 100m relay [1984, 1988, 1992]

1959 - Emma Thompson
Academy Award-winning actress: Howard’s End [1992], Sense and Sensibility, The Remains of the Day, In the Name of the Father, Look Back in Anger, Henry V; screenwriter: Sense and Sensibility; daughter of producer Eric Thompson, actress Phyllida Law; sister of actress Sophie Thompson

1966 - Graeme Clark
musician: bass: group: Wet Wet Wet: With a Little Help From My Friends, Goodnight Girl, Love is All Around

1966 - Samantha Fox
singer: Naughty Girls [Need Love Too]


Chart Toppers
April 15th.



1945 My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra (vocal: Kitty
Kallen)
Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 I Believe - Frankie Laine
Doggie in the Window - Patti Page
Till I Waltz Again with You - Teresa Brewer
Your Cheatin’ Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Blue Moon - The Marcels
Apache - Jorgen Ingmann
Dedicated to the One I Love - The Shirelles
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
You’ve Made Me So Very Happy - Blood, Sweat & Tears
Galveston - Glen Campbell
Woman of the World (Leave My World Alone) - Loretta Lynn

1977 Dancing Queen - Abba
Don’t Give Up on Us - David Soul
Don’t Leave Me This Way - Thelma Houston
Lucille - Kenny Rogers

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Nightshift - Commodores
Honor Bound - Earl Thomas Conley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
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Old 04-15-2008, 11:00 PM
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107th day of 2008 - 259 remaining.

Wednesday, April 16, 2008
LITTLE TRAMP DAY.


In his autobiography, he wrote, “There are more valid facts and details in works of art than there are in history books.”

Charlie Chaplin’s life was a work of art and it began on this day in 1889 in London, England. He started on his acting career as a young child, performing on stage, then touring with Fred Karno’s company as a teenager. When he was twenty-four, Chaplin joined Mack Sennett’s Keystone company where he made over thirty films. These films were the making of the cane-twirling clown with the baggy pants. The character of the little tramp came to fulfillment in the 1915 film, The Tramp.

Four years later, he formed United Artists Corporation with other film artists, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith, and produced many independent films including The Gold Rush in 1925, City Lights in 1931 and Modern Times in 1936. His first talkie was The Great Dictator in 1940. And one of his most remembered films was made in 1952, Limelight.

Ostracized from the American film community and denied reentry after a trip abroad, because of his refusal to become an American citizen, his left-wing causes and his marriages to several teenagers, Chaplin lived in Switzerland from 1952 until 1972 with his fourth wife, Oona, the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

In 1972, he returned to the United States (this time he was permitted entry) to accept a special award at the Annual Academy Awards. And, in 1975 he was knighted by the Queen of England. Two years later, on Christmas Day, the little tramp died at his home in Vevey, Switzerland.

Many have imitated or attempted to become the next Charlie Chaplin. However, as Max Sennett once said, Chaplin is the “greatest artist who ever lived.”

Click.

Events
April 16th.



1851 - A lighthouse was swept away in a gale at Minot’s Ledge, .

1900 - The first book of U.S. postage stamps was issued. The two-cent stamps were available in books of 12, 24 and 48 stamps.

1905 - An endowment of a college teachers’ pension fund was established by Andrew Carnegie. He donated $10,000,000 of personal money to set up the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

1922 - Belvin Maynard, better known as the ‘Flying Parson’, gave his first sermon from an airplane this day. No, Reverend Maynard was not found guilty of speaking ‘down’ to his flock...

1926 - The Book-of-the-Month Club in New York City chose as its first selection, Lolly Willowes or The Loving Huntsman by Sylvia Townsend as the offering to its 4,750 members.

1940 - The first no-hit, no-run game thrown on an opening day of baseball season was earned by Bob Feller. The Cleveland Indians blanked the Chicago White Sox 1-0.

1947 - Zoomar arrived. No, this is not about some comic book superhero or space alien. Zoomar is a lens demonstrated by NBC-TV in New York City. The Zoomar lens is a device that can feature close-up and long distance camera shots from a stationary camera. Eventually, the lens would be scaled down for use by regular photographers, not just for television. There are many different kinds of close-up/long distance lenses today, including the zoom lens named after the original Zoomar.

1957 - Polly Bergen starred in The Helen Morgan Story on the CBS television presentation of Playhouse 90.

1968 - Baseball’s longest night game was completed -- after 24 innings. The game took six hours, six minutes to play. The winner? The Houston Astros.

1973 - Former Beatle, Paul McCartney, leading the group, Wings, starred in his first TV special titled, James Paul McCartney. The show featured the new group, including Paul’s wife, Linda (on keyboards and backing vocals).

1978 - St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Forsch pitched a no-hitter beating the Phillies 5-0. His brother, Ken, repeated the feat with the Houston Astros a year later, making them the first brothers to throw major-league no-hitters. Bob tossed a second no-hitter in September, 1983, to set a record for Cardinal pitchers.

1985 - Mickey Mantle, banned from baseball in 1983 because of his association with an Atlantic City casino, was reinstated on this day. He threw out the first pitch to a standing ovation as the New York Yankees played their home opener against the Chicago White Sox.

1987 - From the Here’s How Not to Be like Howard Stern file: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) sternly warned U.S. radio stations to watch the use of indecent language on the airwaves. This was directed at shock jocks, like Stern, and those on your neighborhood radio station. Some stations, the FCC noted, had gone way beyond the seven dirty words made famous by comedian George Carlin in a routine from the early 1970s.


Birthdays
April 16th.



1660 - Hans Sloane
doctor, naturalist, collector: instrumental in the founding of the British Museum [the national museum and library of the United Kingdom]: Sloane left his personal collection to Great Britain upon his death; died in 1753

1866 - Jose de Diego
patriot and political leader of Puerto Rico; April 16 is a legal holiday in Puerto Rico in honor of de Diego; died July 17, 1918

1867 - Wilbur Wright
aviator: one of the Wright Brothers; died May 30, 1912

1871 - John Millington Synge
poet, playwright: The Playboy of the Western World, The Aran Islands, Shadow of the Glen, Riders to the Sea, The Well of the Saints; died Mar 24, 1909

1889 - Sir Charles (Spencer) ‘Charlie’ Chaplin
actor, comedian; died Dec 25, 1977; see Little Tramp Day [above]

1913 - Les Tremayne (Henning)
actor: The War of the Worlds, Francis Goes to West Point, The Slime People, I Love Melvin; died Dec 19, 2003

1914 - John Hodiak
actor: The Miniver Story, Conquest of Cochise; died Oct 19, 1955

1919 - Merce Cunningham
dancer, choreographer: films: Changing Steps, Beach Birds for Camera

1920 - Barry Nelson (Nielsen)
actor: Airport, The Shining, Pete ’n’ Tillie, The Human Comedy, Island Claw, Shadow of the Thin Man

1921 - Sir Peter Ustinov
Academy Award-winning actor: Spartacus [1960], Topkapi [1964]; Quo Vadis, Death on the Nile, Beau Brummel; died Mar 28, 2004

1922 - Kingsley Amis
novelist: The Crime of the Century, Lucky Jim; died Oct 22, 1995

1923 - Bennie Green
trombonist, lyricist: The Diamond and the Goose; journalist; died Mar 23, 1977

1924 - Henry Mancini (Enrico Nicola Mancini)
Academy Award-winning composer: Moon River [1961], Days of Wine and Roses [1962], Breakfast at Tiffany’s score [1961], Victor/Victoria score [1982]; composed themes for The Pink Panther, Mr. Lucky, Peter Gunn, Charade, NBC Mystery Movie, NBC Nightly News, Love Theme from Romeo & Juliet; 20 Grammy Awards; died June 14, 1994

1927 - Edie Adams (Elizabeth Edith Enke)
actress: The Apartment, The Oscar, Love with the Proper Stranger, The Ernie Kovacs Show; spokesperson for Muriel Cigars: “Hey big spender, spend a little time with me.”

1929 - Roy Hamilton
singer: You’ll Never Walk Alone, If I Loved You, Ebb Tide, Unchained Melody, Don’t Let Go, You Can Have Her; died July 20, 1969

1930 - Herbie Mann (Soloman)
jazz musician, flautist: Hijack, Superman, Comin’ Home Baby, Bang! Bang!, Violets Don’t be Blue; died July 1, 2003

1933 - Ike Pappas
newsman: CBS News

1935 - Bobby Vinton (Stanley Vintulla)
singer: Roses are Red [My Love], Blue on Blue, Blue Velvet, Mr. Lonely, There! I’ve Said It Again, My Melody of Love

1939 - Dusty Springfield (Mary Isabel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien)
singer: Wishin’ and Hopin’, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, The Look of Love, Son-of-a-Preacher Man, The Windmills of Your Mind, A Brand New Me; group: The Springfields: Silver Threads and Golden Needles; inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame [3-15-99]; died Mar 2, 1999

1942 - Jim (James Reynold) Lonborg
baseball: pitcher: Boston Red Sox [Cy Young Award: 1967/World Series: 1967/all-star: 1967], Milwaukee Brewers, Philadelphia Phillies

1947 - Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Lew Alcindor)
Basketball Hall of Famer: LA Lakers, Milwaukee Bucks: NBA career record: games played [1.560], points [38,387], field goals [15,387], blocked shots [3,189] cameo role: Airplane!

1947 - Gerry Rafferty
singer, songwriter: Stuck in the Middle with You, Star, Baker Street

1949 - Bill Spooner
musician: guitar: group: The Tubes: LPs: Young and Rich, T.R.A.S.H., Love Bomb

1953 - Jay O. Sanders
actor: Tucker: The Man and His Dream, Crime Story, Aftermash

1954 - Ellen Barkin
Emmy Award-winning actress: Before Women Had Wings [1997 miniseries]; Diner, Tender Mercies, Wild Bill, Bad Company, Daniel, Sea of Love, Eddie and the Cruisers

1963 - Jimmy Osmond
singer: group: The Osmonds: the youngest Osmond

1965 - Jon Cryer
actor: Heads, Hot Shots!, Superman 4: The Quest for Peace, Pretty in Pink, No Small Affair, Partners, The Famous Teddy Z

1976 - Lukas Haas
actor: Boys, Leap of Faith, Rambling Rose, The Lady in White, Witness, Mars Attacks!


Chart Toppers
April 16th.


1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief - Betty Hutton
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Cross Over the Bridge - Patti Page
Here - Tony Martin
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares
Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Slow Twistin’ - Chubby Checker
She’s Got You - Patsy Cline

1970 Let It Be - The Beatles
ABC - The Jackson 5
Spirit in the Sky - Norman Greenbaum
Tennessee Bird Walk - Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees
Lay Down Sally - Eric Clapton
Someone Loves You Honey - Charley Pride

1986 Rock Me Amadeus - Falco
Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Manic Monday - Bangles
She and I - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #451  
Old 04-16-2008, 11:00 PM
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108th day of 2008 - 258 remaining.

Thursday, April 17, 2008
IT’S A LO-O-ONG WAR DAY.


We are all aware of short wars like 3-day, 7-day, and 3-month wars, but have you ever heard of a 335-year war? Today is the anniversary of the day such a war officially ended.

In the year 1651, a war began between the Isles of Scilly and the Netherlands. No one seems to know or care what started the war. What seems to be more important is that, although the actual fighting ended in the 17th century, no one had ever officially declared an end to the war until this day in 1986. It was then that the Netherlands ambassador to the Isles of Scilly, Jonkheer Rein Huydecoper, flew to the islands delivering a proclamation that terminated the war.

We’d say that 335 years is a lo-o-ong time to hold a grudge!

Click, and click.

Events
April 17th.



1629 - Horses were first imported into the colonies by the Massachusetts Bay Colony on this day.

1704 - John Campbell, known by many as America’s first news vendor, published what would eventually become the first successful American newspaper, the Boston News-Letter.

1810 - Pineapple cheese was patented by Lewis M. Norton. Mr. Norton lived nowhere near pineapples. He was from Troy, PA. Pineapple cheese... Yummy!

1860 - New Yorkers learned of a new law. It required fire escapes to be provided for tenement houses.

1916 - The American Academy of Arts and Letters obtained its charter from Congress.

1933 - Backed by the On the Trail portion of the magnificent Grand Canyon Suite, Johnny Roventini, pillbox hat and all, uttered the words “Call for Philip Morris” for the first time on radio. The famous phrase was said in perfect B flat pitch and tone to perfectly match the accompanying music. This “Call for Philip Morris” phrase became one of the most famous in all of advertising. Here are a few other classics from advertising’s golden age to jog your brain’s memory cells: “See the U.S.A. in your Chevrolet,” “Pepsi Cola hits the spot, 12 full ounces and that’s a lot,” “When better cars are built, Buick will build them,” “Aren’t you glad you use Dial? Don’t you wish everybody did?”

1935 - People gathered around the radio to listen for the first time to what would become the ultimate horror show on NBC Radio. Lights Out remained on radio until 1946.

1941 - Igor Sikorsky accomplished the first successful helicopter (or heliocopter as it was called then) lift-off from water near Stratford, CT.

1956 - Two of the greats began their major-league baseball careers this day: Luis Aparicio played for the Chicago White Sox and Don Drysdale began work with the Brooklyn (later, LA) Dodgers. Aparicio became the American League Rookie of the Year. Drysdale won 209 games before he retired. Both were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY on the same day, August 12, 1984. Drysdale later became a broadcaster for the Chicago White Sox and the Dodgers.

1961 - The 33rd Annual Academy Awards ceremony, hosted by Bob Hope, ended the ten year drought during which producer, writer, director Billy Wilder could not capture the elusive Oscar. Wilder was no stranger to Oscar, though. He had three of the golden statuettes sitting on his mantle (or wherever the Wilders keep their awards) from previous years. But this year, the winnings were much sweeter. Not only did Mr. Wilder receive the Oscar for Best Writing/Story and Screenplay/Written Directly for the Screen (shared with I.A.L. Diamond) and the Best Director Oscar (both for The Apartment), he and The Apartment also received the top award, Best Picture. There were other happy Oscar recipients this night at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, as well. Burt Lancaster took the Best Actor honors and Shirley Jones, the Best Supporting Actress, for their performances in Elmer Gantry. Elizabeth Taylor was voted Best Actress for her role in Butterfield 8. Spartacus, nominated in six categories, won four Oscars, including one for Peter Ustinov as Best Actor in a Supporting Role. The Best Music/Song was awarded to Never on Sunday and Manos Hadjidakis from the foreign flick: Pote tin Kyriaki. Yes, we know ... it’s all Greek to you. Some one-Oscar wonder films from 1960: Sons and Lovers, The Alamo, The Time Machine, Exodus. Some multi-nominations but no wins from that year include: Inherit the Wind, The Sundowners, Cimarron, Sunrise at Campobello, Psycho, Bells are Ringing, The Magnificent Seven, Can-Can.

1964 - The CBS television network paid $1,800,000 for the rights to the 1964-1965 National Football League (NFL) Championship games.

1967 - Comedian Joey Bishop got the opportunity to attempt to unseat the king of late night, Johnny Carson. The Joey Bishop Show made its debut on ABC-TV this night. Bishop, Regis Philbin (announcer) and Johnny Mann (music) couldn’t beat Carson, but held out until December 26, 1969 (the show’s last broadcast).

1970 - The breakup of the most influential rock group in music history was official when Paul McCartney’s solo LP, McCartney, was released. Paul played all the instruments himself on this Apple album.

1971 - Joy to the World, by Three Dog Night, made it to the top of the pop music charts on this day. The song was number one for six weeks. Now that’s a hit!

1972 - Betcha by Golly, Wow, by The Stylistics from Philadelphia, earned a gold record for the group. The Stylistics also scored million sellers with You are Everything, I’m Stone in Love with You, Break Up to Make Up and You Make Me Feel Brand New. The smooth R&B group could have won an award for the most creative use of the words, Betcha, by Golly, Wow, too, if anyone had thought about it...

1985 - The U.S. Postal Service unveiled its new 22-cent LOVE stamp. In a clever promotion, the USPS used the set of ABC-TV’s The Love Boat as a backdrop. The stamp went on to become one of the most popular ever offered by the postal service.

1985 - Many fans of the TV soap opera, Days of Our Lives, lined up in Hollywood, CA in hopes of getting the hottest tickets in town -- for the wedding of Bo and Hope on the popular soap. It was the first soap wedding open to fans.


Birthdays
April 17th.



1837 - J.P. (John Pierpoint) Morgan
financier; died Mar 31, 1913

1894 - Nikita Khrushchev
U.S.S.R. premier [1958-1964]; died Sep 11, 1971

1897 - Thornton Wilder
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: The Bridge of San Luis Rey [1928] and playwright: Our Town [1938], The Skin of Our Teeth [1943]; died Dec 7, 1975

1903 - Gregor Piatigorsky
Russian-born cellist: performed worldwide; teacher: Univ. Southern California; died Aug 6, 1976

1905 - Arthur Lake (Silverlake)
actor: Blondie series, It’s a Great Life; died Jan 9, 1987

1916 - Sirimavo Bandaranaike
Ceylon Prime Minister: first woman prime minister in the world; died Oct 10, 2000

1918 - William Holden (Beedle Jr.)
Academy Award-winning actor: Stalag 17 [1953], Love is a Many-Splendored Thing, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Born Yesterday, The Bridges at Toko-Ri, Casino Royale, The Moon is Blue, Network, Picnic, Sunset Boulevard, The Towering Inferno, The World of Suzie Wong; died Nov 16, 1981

1923 - Lindsay Anderson
director: This Sporting Life, The Whales of August, Glory! Glory!, Britannia Hospital, If..., O Lucky Man!; died Aug 30, 1994

1923 - Solly (Solomon Joseph) Hemus
baseball: SL Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies

1923 - Harry Reasoner
newsman: Sixty Minutes, CBS Sunday Night News with Harry Reasoner, ABC News with Harry Reasoner and Barbara Walters; died Aug 6, 1991

1924 - Roy Gallant
author: Mirages & Sundogs, Earth’s Vanishing Forests

1930 - Chris Barber
musician: trombone, bandleader: Petite Fleur; appeared in film: Look Back in Anger

1934 - Warren Chiasson
jazz musician: vibes: group: Warren Chiasson Duo: LP: Point Counterpoint

1934 - Don Kirshner
music publisher: Aldon Music with Al Nevins, Brill Building mogul: Screen Gems Music: started Bubblegum music fad with creation of The Monkees

1935 - Lamar Lundy
football: LA Rams

1943 - Dennis Hextall
hockey: NHL: NY Rangers, LA Kings, California Golden Seals, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings, Washington Capitals; son of Hockey Hall of Famer Bryan A. Hextall

1944 - Bobby Curtola
singer: one of Canada’s early teen idols: Hand In Hand With You, Don’t You Sweetheart Me, Three Rows Over, Fortune Teller; TV host: After Four, Shake, Rock, Roll

1949 - Monroe Eley
football: British Columbia Lions

1950 - Pedro (Modesto Delfi) Garcia
baseball: Milwaukee Brewers, Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays

1951 - Olivia Hussey
actress: Ice Cream Man, Stephen King’s It, Psycho 4: The Beginning, Death on the Nile, The Bastard, Romeo and Juliet

1955 - Pete Shelley (McNeish)
musician, singer: group: The Buzz****s: Totally from the Heart, Alright O.K., Going Steady, Love Bites, What Do I Get, Orgasm Addict, Ever Fallen In Love With Someone You Shouldn’t Fall in Love With, I Don't Mind, Promises

1959 - Sean Bean
actor: Goldeneye, Sharpe’s series, Patriot Games, The Field, Stormy Monday, The Lord of the Rings series

1959 - Stephen Singleton
musician: saxophone: group: ABC: Tears are Not Enough, Poison Arrow, Be Near Me, When Smokey Sings, King Without a Crown

1961 - Boomer (Norman) Esiason
football: quarterback: NY Jets, Cincinnati Bengals [Super Bowl XXIII]; TV commentator: ABC Monday Night Football [1998-1999]

1967 - Liz Phair
singer, songwriter: LPs: Exile in Guyville, whitechocolatespaceegg.


Chart Toppers
April 17th.



1947 The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
How are Things in Glocca Morra - Buddy Clark
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Fess Parker
Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White - Perez Prado
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
South Street - The Orlons
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Another Day/Oh Woman Oh Why - Paul McCartney
Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean
Empty Arms - Sonny James

1979 What a Fool Believes - The Doobie Brothers
Knock on Wood - Amii Stewart
Music Box Dancer - Frank Mills
(If Loving You is Wrong) I Don’t Want to Be Right - Barbara Mandrell

1987 Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now - Starship
I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me) - Aretha Franklin & George Michael
Don’t Dream It’s Over - Crowded House
"You’ve Got" the Touch - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
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Old 04-17-2008, 11:00 PM
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109th day of 2008 - 257 remaining.

Friday, April 18, 2008
MIDNIGHT RIDE DAY.


At about 10 p.m. on this day in 1775, three men took to their horses to ride from Boston to Concord, MA to warn the citizens of the approaching British army. Most of us know of just one of those riders, one Paul Revere. The famous poem, Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, glorified the Bostonian as the lone rider. He was, in fact, accompanied by William Dawes and Samuel Prescott.

We think it’s time they should get some recognition too! After all, it wasn’t their fault that their partner in the midnight ride was already well known, having been a member of the Sons of Liberty; incited the British by publishing an engraving of the Boston Massacre; carried messages for the Committees of Correspondence, an underground organization; and having been a participant in the Boston Tea Party.

Incidentally, only Prescott made it all the way to Concord. Revere was nabbed by a British cavalry patrol near Lexington, MA (Dawes and Prescott escaped). We’re not sure what happened to Dawes but Revere was released and returned to Lexington -- without his horse. There was lots of running/riding around that night, but suffice to say, when British forces arrived in Lexington, they found the minutemen waiting for them.

In honor of this midnight ride, get out your Revereware and make a pot of tea.

More here, and here.

Events
April 18th.


1796 - The Archers, the first opera written by an American composer, was performed in New York City. Benjamin Carr wrote the work.

1846 - The telegraph ticker (“....- ....- -----”) was patented by R.E. House of New York City. What does the telegraph message above say? “440”.

1877 - Charles Cros wrote a paper on that described the process of recording and reproducing sound. In France, Mr. Cros is still regarded as the inventor of the phonograph, while in the U.S., Thomas Edison gets the credit.

1895 - New York State passed an act that established free public baths! They were to be open 14 hours a day and provide hot and cold water.

1906 - The Great San Francisco Earthquake occurred at 5:13 a.m. The tremendous earthquake was responsible for some 3,000 deaths and catastrophic damage. There were many fires that followed the quake and they took days -- even weeks -- to contain. Survivors of the earthquake gathered annually for memorial services beginning at the moment the predawn temblor struck and became history.

1910 - Walter R. Brookins made the first airplane flight at night. He passed over Montgomery, AL. At least he was pretty sure it was Montgomery...

1923 - Yankee Stadium opened in the Bronx, NY as the hometown team, the NY Yankees, hosted the Boston Red Sox. A record crowd of 74,000 fans saw the action at the first three-level stadium in the U.S.

1929 - Red Nichols and his Five Pennies recorded the Glenn Miller arrangement of Indiana for Brunswick Records. Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa and Jack Teagarden were all part of the recording session that took place in New York City.

1934 - The first Laundromat opened -- in Fort Worth, TX. For the first time, folks could rent washing machines for laundering clothes. Eventually progress made it possible to rent dryers, too!

1945 - It was on Ie Shima, a small island off Okinawa, that Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ernie Pyle’s career came to an end. Worrying more about his Army buddies than himself, he didn’t take cover but turned to ask if they were OK while under Japanese sniper fire. He took a bullet in the left temple. A memorial on the site where Ernest T. Pyle was killed reads, “At this spot the 77th Infantry Division lost a buddy. Ernie Pyle 18 April 1945.” Once buried there, his remains now lie at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Punchbowl Crater on Oahu, Hawaii. Pyle was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.

1953 - Possibly the longest measured home run ever hit in a major-league baseball game was credited to New York Yankees slugger Mickey Mantle on this day. ‘The Mick’ hit a 565-foot homer in Griffith Stadium in Washington, DC.

1956 - Eddie Rommel, a baseball umpire, wore eyeglasses, a first for the game. This game was between the NY Yankees and Washington Senators.

1957 - Comedian Johnny Carson turned briefly to TV acting in a role on the Playhouse 90 production of Three Men on a Horse on CBS-TV. Carson, of Who Do You Trust? fame, was five years from becoming the host of The Tonight Show.

1960 - The Mutual Broadcasting System was sold to the 3M Company of Minnesota for $1.25 million. Previously, the network had been owned by MONY (Mutual of New York).

1965 - Contralto Marian Anderson ended her 30-year singing career with a concert at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

1966 - Bob Hope did it again after six years! He both hosted and received an award at the 38th Annual Academy Awards celebration at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Los Angeles. This time he received a gold medal, the Honorary Award for unique and distinguished service to the film industry and the Academy. Other award recipients included Shelley Winters for her Best Supporting Actress role in A Patch of Blue; Martin Balsam, Best Supporting Actor for his performance in A Thousand Clowns. The Best Actor Oscar went to Lee Marvin (Cat Ballou); and Julie Christie picked up the Best Actress Oscar (Darling). The Oscar for the Best Music/Song from a 1965 movie was The Shadow of Your Smile from The Sandpiper (Johnny Mandel-music, Paul Francis Webster-lyrics). It’s a good thing that the Oscars were being broadcast in color this night (the first time) because the Best Director and Best Picture winner was The Sound of Music (Robert Wise, producer and director). We don’t think the hills wouldn’t look very alive in black and white.

1974 - James Brown, the ‘Godfather of Soul’, received a gold record this day for the single, The Payback. Of the 44 hits that Brown would put on the charts over three decades, he received only one other gold record -- for Get on the Good Foot - Part 1 in 1972. His biggest pop hits include: I Got You (I Feel Good) at number three in 1965, Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag at number eight in 1965, It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World at number eight in 1966, I Got The Feelin’ at number six in 1968 and Living in America at number four in 1986. This song was featured in the Sylvester Stallone film, Rocky IV.

1981 - Tom Seaver of the Cincinnati Reds became the fifth pitcher in the history of major-league baseball to earn 3,000 strikeouts in a career. Seaver struck out Keith Hernandez for the historic ‘K’. The Cardinals, however, beat Tom Terrific, 10-4.

1984 - Michael Jackson faced surgery in Los Angeles. Doctors performed scalp surgery to repair damage done after the megastar’s hair caught fire during the filming of a Pepsi commercial on January 27. Jackson was hospitalized and recuperated for months before he could return to work. His single recording of Thriller had been certified platinum in February, 1984.

1985 - The sequined ‘King of Show Business’, Liberace, broke his own record for ticket sales at Radio City Music Hall. Liberace grossed more than $2,000,000 for his engagement in the historic New York City venue. His previous record was set in 1984 ($1.6 million in tickets sold).


Birthdays
April 18th.


1857 - Clarence Darrow
attorney: famous Scopes ‘monkey trial’; died Mar 13, 1938

1880 - Sam (Samuel Earl) Crawford
‘Wahoo Sam’: Baseball Hall of Famer: Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers [all-star: 1907, 1908, 1909]; holds individual career record of 312 triples; died June 15, 1968

1882 - Leopold Stokowski
conductor: Philadelphia Orchestra; died Sep 13, 1977

1918 - Tony Mottola
guitarist: played with Al Caiola, George Hall’s orchestra, CBS radio studio orchestra, worked w/Raymond Scott backing up young Frank Sinatra and Perry Como, arranger for Como’s TV variety show; composer: films: Running on Empty, Violated

1921 - Barbara Hale
actress: Perry Mason, The Oklahoman, The Defense Never Rests, Airport
1930 - Clive Revill
actor: The Sea Wolf, The Empire Strikes Back, The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

1936 - Don Ohl
basketball: Detroit Pistons, Baltimore Bullets, Atlanta Hawks

1937 - Robert Hooks
actor: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, A Woman Called Moses, Heat Wave, The Execution, Passenger 57, Day of Absence, Where’s Daddy?

1938 - Hal Galper
jazz pianist: group: Hal Galper Quintet; played with Cannonball Adderley, Donald Byrd, Stan Getz, Chuck Mangione, Joe Henderson; author: The Touring Musician

1938 - Richie Pettibone
football: Washington Redskins; coach: Oregon State University

1941 - Walt Sweeney
football: Syracuse Univ; NFL: San Diego Chargers

1941 - Mike Vickers
musician: guitar, reeds: group: Manfred Mann: Why Should We Not, ****-A-Hoop, 5-4-3-2-1, Do Wah Diddy Diddy, Oh No Not My Baby, If You Gotta Go, Go Now, Just like a Woman, The Mighty Quinn, Pretty Flamingo, Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James, The One in the Middle

1942 - Steve Blass
baseball: pitcher: Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1971/all-star: 1972]

1942 - Pete Gogolak
football: first soccer-style kicker in pro football: Buffalo Bills, NY Giants

1942 - Jochen Rindt
auto racer: Grand Prix champ: U.S. [1969], Monaco GP, Dutch, French, British, German [1970]; killed Sep 5, 1970 during practice for Italian Grand Prix

1946 - Hayley Mills
actress: The Parent Trap, The Moon Spinners, Pollyanna; singer: Let’s Get Together

1946 - Alexander ‘Skip’ Spence
musician: drummer: Jefferson Airplane; guitar, singer: group: Moby Grape; died Apr 16, 1999

1947 - Dorothy Lyman
actress: All My Children, Mama’s Family, Camp Cucamonga: How I Spent My Summer Vacation, Ruby in Paradise

1947 - James Woods
actor: The Onion Field, Holocaust, The Way We Were, Night Moves, Against All Odds, Salvador, Casino, Nixon

1953 - Rick Moranis
actor: Little Giants, The Flintstones, My Blue Heaven, Parenthood, Honey I Shrunk the Kids series, Ghostbusters series, Spaceballs, Little Shop of Horrors, Brewster’s Millions, SCTV; writer: Strange Brew

1956 - John James
actor: Search for Tomorrow, Dynasty, As the World Turns; son of WABC personality Herb Oscar Anderson

1956 - Eric Roberts
actor: Doctor Who, The Hard Truth, Fugitive Among Us, A Family Matter, Descending Angel, To Heal a Nation, The Pope of Greenwich Village, The Coca-Cola Kid, Star 80, Raggedy Man, King of the Gypsies; brother of actress Julia Roberts

1961 - Jane Leeves
actress: Frasier, Throb, Miracle on 34th Street, Mr. Write

1963 - Conan O’Brien
TV talk show host: Late Night with Conan O’Brien; Emmy Award-winning writer: Saturday Night Live [1989]; The Simpsons; producer: Lockwell; comedian: Not Necessarily the News

1976 - Melissa Joan Hart
actress: Clarissa Explains It All, Twisted Desire, Sabrina the Teenage Witch.


Chart Toppers
April 18th.


1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover - The Art Moonie Orchestra
But Beautiful - Frank Sinatra
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
Long Tall Sally - Little Richard
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Suspicion - Terry Stafford
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Rockin’ Robin - Michael Jackson
My Hang-Up is You - Freddie Hart

1980 Another Brick in the Wall - Pink Floyd
Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
Honky Tonk Blues - Charley Pride

1988 Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car - Billy Ocean
Devil Inside - INXS
Where Do Broken Hearts Go - Whitney Houston
I Wanna Dance with You - Eddie Rabbitt


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #453  
Old 04-18-2008, 11:00 PM
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110th day of 2008 - 256 remaining.

Saturday, April 19, 2008
MARATHON DAY.


On this day in 1897, the first annual Boston Marathon -- the first of its type in the United States -- was run. John J. McDermott of New York City won.

This marathon attracts world-class, and some not so world-class, runners from around the world. Previous runners who have claimed 1st place in the 26-mile marathon through the streets of Boston include Rosie Ruiz who, apparently, didn’t run the race at all, but merely joined in a short distance from the finish line and claimed first place! Another participant supposedly took a taxi cab around the course and waited until the right time to join in -- and won! The prizes were, however, taken away from those who didn’t run the Boston Marathon fair and square.

A fine example of the tireless men and women who train to run in this premier event is Shigeki Tanaka, a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bombing, who won the Boston Marathon in 1951.

Many thousands of runners participate in marathon races such as the Boston Marathon, making these events colorful and exciting to witness. Hundreds of thousands of spectators turn out to cheer the runners in these grueling tests of strength and stamina.

More reading on this here.

Events
April 19th.


1892 - The Duryea gasoline buggy was first driven in the United States.

1924 - A new show joined the airwaves. The Chicago Barn Dance aired on WLS radio in the Windy City. Later, the famous program would be renamed The National Barn Dance. This program was the first country music jamboree on radio. (The Grand Ole Opry on WSM Radio in Nashville, TN began in 1925.) National Barn Dance continued for many years on the radio station that was owned by retailer, Sears Roebuck & Co. WLS, in fact, stood for ‘World’s Largest Store’. Though the Barn Dance gave way to rock music and now, talk radio, The Grand Ole Opry continues each weekend in Nashville.

1940 - Paavo Nurmi, a runner from Finland, predicted that a four-minute mile would be run within the next decade. He was off by only 4 years! Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile at Oxford, England in a time of 3:59.4 on May 6, 1954. Don Bowden was the first American runner to break the mark with a 3:58.7 mile at Stockton, California on June 1, 1957. Jim Beatty became the first sub-four-minute indoor mile runner with a 3:58.9 mark in Los Angeles on February 10, 1962.

1945 - The musical Carousel, based on Molnar’s Liliom, opened at the Majestic Theatre in New York City. John Raitt and Jan Clayton starred in the show which ran for 890 performances. Music was by the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein.

1951 - General Douglas MacArthur spoke before Congress. The highlight of this memorable address was General MacArthur stating, “Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.”

1951 - Shigeki Tanaka, who survived the atomic blast at Hiroshima, Japan in World War II, won the Boston Marathon.

1956 - Actress Grace Kelly became Princess Grace of Monaco on this day. The beloved U.S. actress from Philadelphia married Prince Rainier III of Monaco in a storybook wedding. More than 1,500 radio, TV, newspaper and magazine reporters were on hand for the event in Monaco, as were most of the citizens of the tiny country.

1956 - Major-league baseball came to New Jersey for the first time as the Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City. Walter O’Malley’s Dodgers played several games in New Jersey during the 1956 season, taking a major step toward vacating Ebbets Field and moving to LA. The Dodgers broke the hearts of many in Flatbush who rallied around the team. Many still talk about the team like it was just yesterday when they played in Brooklyn. Ebbets Field was named for Charles Ebbets and was built, beginning in 1912, on a plot of land he purchased for $500.

1958 - The San Francisco Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers met for the first time as major-league baseball came to the West Coast.

1959 - Singer Harry Belafonte appeared in the first of two benefit concerts for charity at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

1967 - Nancy Sinatra and her dad, Frank, found a gold record award in the mailbox, for their collaboration on the hit single, Something Stupid.

1981 - The first major-league baseball team to win 11 straight games at the beginning of a season was the Oakland A’s. Win number 11 came with a few fireworks, as a brawl or two became a part of a 6-1 victory over Seattle in the first game of a doubleheader. In the second game, however, Seattle ended the A’s win streak with a 3-2 win.

1985 - A Central Regional High School student, Al Leiter, used a blazing 85-mph fastball to strike out 32 batters on the way to a 0-0 tie! The game, played in Berkeley Township, NJ, was called after 13 innings. Leiter’s effort was just five short of the record set in 1971. When asked about the game being called at that time, Leiter looked at reporters and said, “Darn. Excuse me, folks, I have to go screw my arm back in place...”

1993 - The Branch-Davidian’s compound in Waco, Texas burned to the ground. It was the anticlimax of a 51-day standoff between the religious cult led by David Koresh and U.S. federal agents (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms). 86 perished including 17 children. Koresh and his followers opted not to surrender themselves and the children to the agents; exchanging gun fire, instead. Nine members of the cult escaped.

1995 - The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, OK was destroyed by a bomb estimated at 5,000 pounds, hidden in a rent-a-truck. The blast was the worst bombing on U.S. soil. Timothy McVeigh was charged with terroristic murder. 168 people including 19 children died in the blast. 490 were injured. On June 2, 1997, McVeigh was found guilty on 11 different counts, including several first degree murder convictions for the deaths of federal officers. He was executed (lethal injection) on June 11, 2001 at the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana. Terry L. Nichols, an Army buddy of McVeigh, was sentenced to life in prison.

2000 - “The empty chairs are a simple yet powerful portrayal of someone’s absence. Like an empty chair at a dinner table, we are always aware of the presence of a loved one’s absence,” said architects Hans and Torrey Butzer and Sven Berg, explaining their inclusion of 168 bronze and stone chairs, each inscribed with a victim's name and mounted on a glass base, the focus at the opening of the Oklahoma City National Memorial. This memorial marks the place where 168 people died in 1995 in the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history. A new expanse of green lawn was once the site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, and a 320-foot-long reflecting pool lined with black stone has replaced the bombed-out street. The chairs, symbolic of tombstones, are also placed in symbolic positions: Nine rows representing the nine floors of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, with each victim's chair placed in the row according to the floor on which he or she worked or was visiting at the time of the blast. 19 of the chairs are smaller, representing the children who were murdered in the attack. Ironically, A 70-year-old elm tree survived the bombing. “The Survivor Tree” is now protected by the Rescuer's Orchard: Fruit trees symbolic of the many rescue workers who pulled survivors from the rubble.


Birthdays
April 19th.



1772 - David Ricardo
economist, author: The High Price of Bullion, a Proof of the Depreciation of Bank Notes, Principles of Political Economy and Taxation; died Sep 11, 1823

1905 - Tommy Benford
drummer: with Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers; died in 1994

1920 - Frank Fontaine
comedian, actor, singer: The Jackie Gleason Show; died Aug 4, 1978

1925 - Hugh O’Brian (Krampke)
actor: In Harm’s Way, Little Big Horn, There’s No Business like Show Business, Twins, Broken Lance, Ten Little Indians, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp

1927 - Don Barbour
singer: group: The Four Freshmen [1953-1960]: Graduation Day, Charmaine, Blue World

1928 - Alexis Korner
musician: guitar, singer: Whole Lotta Love; died Jan 1, 1984

1930 - Dick Sargent (Richard Cox)
actor: Bewitched, That Touch of Mink, Body Count, Fantasy Island; died July 8, 1994

1931 - Alex Webster
football: North Carolina State Univ., NY Giants

1933 - Jayne Mansfield (Vera Jane Palmer)
actress: Pete Kelly’s Blues, It Takes a Thief, The Girl Can’t Help It; killed in car crash near New Orleans LA June 29, 1967

1934 - Dickie Goodman (Richard Dorian Goodman)
entertainer: group: Buchanan and Goodman: Flying Saucer [Parts 1 & 2], Mr. Jaws; died Nov 6, 1989

1935 - Dudley Moore
actor: Arthur, Arthur 2, 10, Crazy People, Parallel Lives, Bedazzled, The Hound of the Baskervilles; died Mar 27, 2002

1936 - Wilfried Martens
Belgium Prime Minister

1937 - Elinor Donahue
actress: Father Knows Best, The Andy Griffith Show, Get a Life, Pretty Woman

1941 - Alan Price
musician: keyboards, singer: groups: Alan Price Combo, The Animals: House of the Rising Sun, We Gotta Get Out of This Place

1942 - Larry (Hilario) Ramos Jr.
musician: guitar, singer: group: The Association: Everything that Touches You, soundtrack for film, Goodbye Columbus

1943 - Eve Graham (Evelyn May Beatsom)
singer: group: The New Seekers: Look What They’ve Done to My Song Ma, I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing

1943 - Czeslaw Bartkowski
jazz composer, musician: drums: has recorded over 80 LPs

1946 - Tim Curry
actor: Muppet Treasure Island, Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Oscar, Stephen King’s It, The Hunt for Red October, Oliver Twist, Annie, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, My Favorite Year, Amadeus, Hair, Wiseguy, The Legend of Prince Valiant, voice of King Chicken in cartoon: Duckman, Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events

1947 - Mark Volman
musician: saxophone, singer: groups: Nightriders, Crossfires, The Turtles: It Ain’t Me Babe, Let Me Be, You Baby, Happy Together, She’d Rather be with Me, Elenore, You Showed Me; duo: Phlorescent Leech and Eddie aka Flo and Eddie: LP: Rock Steady with Flo and Eddie

1949 - Lynn Powis
hockey: NHL: Chicago Blackhawks, Kansas City Scouts

1956 - Sue Barker
tennis: French Open Champion: Women’s Singles [1976]


Chart Toppers
April 19th.


1949 Cruising Down the River - The Russ Morgan Orchestra (vocal: The
Skyliners)
Red Roses for a Blue Lady - Vaughn Monroe
Forever and Ever - Perry Como
Candy Kisses - George Morgan

1957 Little Darlin’ - The Diamonds
Party Doll - Buddy Knox
Come Go with Me - The Dell-Vikings
Gone - Ferlin Husky

1965 I’m Telling You Now - Freddie & The Dreamers
Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders
I Know a Place - Petula Clark
King of the Road - Roger Miller

1973 The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia - Vicki Lawrence
Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree - Dawn featuring Tony
Orlando
Sing - Carpenters
A Shoulder to Cry On - Charley Pride

1981 Kiss on My List - Daryl Hall & John Oates
Morning Train (Nine to Five) - Sheena Easton
Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr./Bill Withers
Old Flame - Alabama

1989 She Drives Me Crazy - Fine Young cannibals
Like a Prayer - Madonna
Funky Cold Medina - Tone Loc
I’m No Stranger to the Rain - Keith Whitley


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
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Old 04-19-2008, 11:00 PM
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111th day of 2008 - 255 remaining.

Sunday, April 20, 2008
BE HAPPY, GO LUCKY DAY.


Your Hit Parade, starring Kay Thompson, Charles Carlyle, Gogo DeLys and Johnny Hanser, was first broadcast on radio this night in 1935. A youngster named Frank Sinatra would later be part of the program as a featured vocalist. Your Hit Parade stayed on the radio airwaves for 24 years.

Snooky Lanson (seen here on the right) would later host the program when it made the transition from radio to TV. Other long-time regulars on the TV version were (left to right): Russell Arms, Gisele MacKenzie and Dorothy Collins. They were the lucky ones who got to present the top seven songs each week.

Since many songs stayed on the list for weeks on end, these vocalists had to invent new ways to present the hit parade. On April 24, 1959, Your Hit Parade died. The regulars just didn’t fit with the new rock ’n’ roll hits. Imagine, if you can, Snooky Lanson singing Hound Dog.

The original title of the radio show was, Lucky Strike Hit Parade, sponsored by, you guessed it, Lucky Strike cigarettes. The cigarette company continued to sponsor the TV show (those were the days when cigarette companies sponsored lots of TV shows); and the opening theme song was Be Happy, Go Lucky.

More reading here, here, here, and here.

Events
April 20th.



1832 - The U.S. Congress and President Andrew Jackson made Hot Springs, Arkansas the first Federal Reservation in order to protect the hot springs flowing from the southwestern slope of Hot Springs Mountain. Although Hot Springs Federal Reservation's name wasn't changed to Hot Springs National Park until 1921, Hot Springs is the oldest park in the National Park System. Yellowstone National Park was the first to bear the title of ‘National Park’. It became a national park in 1872.

1865 - Safety matches were first advertised this day.

1931 - Louis Armstrong recorded the classic, When It’s Sleepy Time Down South, for Okeh Records. Satchmo would use the tune as his theme song for decades. The song was waxed in Chicago, IL.

1931 - The great Knute Rockne died in a plane crash on March 31, 1931. It would be tough to fill his shoes. On this day, twenty days later, Jesse Harper became the new athletic director and Heartley ‘Hunk’ Anderson took over as coach of Notre Dame. Anderson coached the Fighting Irish from 1931-33. Elmer Layden replaced Anderson from 1934-40 and Frank Leahy coached Notre Dame twice -- from 1941-43 and from 1946-53.

1934 - One of America’s most beloved child stars made her debut. Shirley Temple debuted in Stand Up and Cheer, which opened in New York City. Moviegoers would rave about her song and dance routine, Baby, Take a Bow, for many years.

1947 - Comedian Fred Allen of Allen’s Alley fame didn’t find things so funny when censors cut him off the air during his radio broadcast. Allen was telling a joke about a mythical network vice-president when he was suddenly taken off the air. One moment please...

1949 - Willie Shoemaker won his first race as a jockey aboard Shafter V at Golden Gate Fields in Albany, CA, not far from San Francisco.

1959 - Desilu Playhouse on CBS-TV presented a two-part show titled, The Untouchables starting this night. Robert Stack starred in the program and became a major television star when The Untouchables become a weekly network series in the fall of 1959.

1961 - The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) gave approval for FM stereo broadcasting. It would be another five or six years before FM stations went ‘underground’ or ‘progressive’ to attract listeners who were tired of the lack of audio quality on AM stations. FM stations to that time had broadcast in glorious monaural sound.

1969 - Ken Harrelson just about quit major-league baseball this day. Harrelson was being traded from the Boston Red Sox, an American League contender, to the Cleveland Indians, a perennial American League non-contender. However, the almighty dollar came to the rescue and Harrelson played for the Tribe in Cleveland after all.

1979 - Johnny Carson was said to be leaving The Tonight Show. Newspapers around the country gave details about why the comedian and late-night host was said to be unhappy after 17 years on the show. Guess what? More moola, more vacation time and a four-day week (not working Mondays) was enough for the ‘Great Carsoni’ to hang around NBC for another 12 years...

1985 - The British pop music group Wham!, featuring George Michael, became the first to release cassettes in the People’s Republic of China. Selections from two of the group’s albums were packaged and sold on the tape.

1987 - Starlight Express posted the largest week’s gross in Broadway history. The roller-skating musical earned $606,081 at the box office. The revival of The King and I starring Yul Brynner had been the previous leader (1985).


Birthdays
April 20th.


1850 - Daniel Chester French
sculptor: public monuments: Minute Man statue in Concord, MA, Abraham Lincoln seated in the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC; died Oct 7, 1931

1889 - Adolf Hitler
murderer of over six-million people, the ultimate racist and as TIME magazine said, “...redefined the meaning of evil forever.”; committed suicide Apr 30, 1945

1893 - Harold Lloyd
comedian, actor: For Heaven’s Sake, Slapstick, Feet First, Safety Last, The Sin of Harold Diddlebock; died Mar 8, 1971

1893 - Joan Miro
artist: Chiffres et Constellations, Le Carnaval d’Arlequin, The Gold of Azure; died Dec 25, 1983

1900 - Norman Norell (Norman David Levinson)
costume designer: Astoria Studio of Paramount Pictures; fashion designer: worked w/Charles Armour, Hattie Carnegie, Anthony Traina [Traina-Norell collection], solo: American fashion leader [1941-1972]; died Oct 25, 1972

1908 - Lionel Hampton
singer, songwriter, jazz musician: vibes, drums, piano, bandleader: On the Sunny Side of the Street, Hey! Hot Mallets, Ba-Ba-Re-Bop, Rag Mop; played with Benny Goodman; died Aug 31, 2002

1920 - John Paul Stevens
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the U.S.

1924 - Nina Foch (Nina Consuelo Maud Fock)
actress: Scaramouche, Spartacus, The Ten Commandments, An American in Paris, Mahogany

1925 - Tito (Ernest) Puente
jazz musician, bandleader: Abanaquito, Para Los Rumberos, Jumpin’ with Symphony Sid, Fancy Feet; died June 1, 2000

1925 - Henri Renaud
French jazz musician: pianist; record producer

1926 - Elena Verdugo
actress: Little Giant, House of Frankenstein, Meet Millie, Marcus Welby, M.D.

1927 - Phil Hill
race driver: one of only two Americans to win the Formula One title [1961]

1929 - Bob Braun
Emmy Award-winning TV host [WLWT-TV]: The Bob Braun Show [1979]; regular on WCPO-TV's The Dottie Mack Show [carried on DuMont TV net]; radio host [WLW]: inducted into Cincinnati Radio Hall of Fame [1993]; singer: ’Til Death Do Us Part [1962]; actor: Die Hard 2, Ironside, Murder, She Wrote, The Young and the Restless; died Jan 15, 2001

1936 - Beaver Harris (William Godwin Harris)
musician: drums: co-led 360 Degree Music Experience [w/Roswell Rudd, Marion Brown, Grachan Moncur III]; died Dec 22, 1991

1937 - George Takei
actor: Star Trek, Kissinger and Nixon, Oblivion, Star Trek 1-6, The Green Berets, Red Line 7000, Ice Palace

1939 - Johnny Tillotson
singer: Poetry In Motion, It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin’, Without You, Talk Back Trembling Lips

1941 - Ryan O’Neal
actor: Love Story, Paper Moon, What’s Up Doc?, Peyton Place

1945 - Michael Brandon (Feldman)
actor: Lovers and Other Strangers, Red Alert, Rich and Famous, Promises in the Dark

1945 - Steve Spurrier
football: Univ. of Florida [Heisman Trophy winner: 1966], SF 49ers

1945 - Jimmy Winston (Langwith)
musician: organ: groups: Moments, Small Faces

1946 - Tom (Thomas George) Hutton
baseball: LA Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, Montreal Expos, Toronto Blue Jays

1947 - Brian Lavender
hockey: NHL: SL Blues, NY Islanders, Detroit Red Wings, California Seals

1947 - David Leland
actor: Time Bandits, Personal Services; director/writer: Wish You Were Here; director: Checking Out, The Big Man: Crossing the Line; writer: Mona Lisa, Personal Services, Running Wild

1948 - Craig Frost
musician: keyboard: group: Grand Funk Railroad: We’re an American Band, The Loco-Motion, Some Kind of Wonderful, Bad Time

1948 - Joe Bonner
jazz pianist, composer

1949 - Jessica (Phyllis) Lange
Academy Award-winning actress: Tootsie [1982], Blue Sky [1994]; Frances, King Kong, All That Jazz, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Sweet Dreams

1951 - Luther Vandross
singer, songwriter: Never Too Much, How Many Times Can We Say Goodbye; died July 1, 2005

1959 - Clint Howard
actor: Backdraft, Cocoon, Ice Cream Man, That Thing You Do!, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, How the Grinch Stole Christmas

1964 - Crispin Glover
actor: Dead Man, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Doors, Twister, Back to the Future, Friday the 13th, Part 4: The Final Chapter, My Tutor, Charlie's Angels [2000]

1976 - Joey Lawrence
actor: Gimme a Break, Blossom, Chains of Gold, Pulse, Wait Till Your Mother Gets Home, Radioland Murders.


Chart Toppers
April 20th.


1950 If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake - Eileen Barton
Music, Music, Music - Teresa Brewer
Peter Cottontail - Gene Autry
Long Gone Lonesome Blues - Hank Williams

1958 He’s Got the Whole World (In His Hands) - Laurie London
Book of Love - The Monotones
Don’t You Just Know It - Huey (Piano) Smith & The Clowns
Oh Lonesome Me - Don Gibson

1966 The Ballad of the Green Berets - SSgt Barry Sadler
(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
Daydream - The Lovin’ Spoonful
I Want to Go with You - Eddy Arnold

1974 TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) - MFSB featuring The Three Degrees
Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me - Gladys Knight & The Pips
The Loco-Motion - Grand Funk
A Very Special Love Song - Charlie Rich

1982 I Love Rock ’N Roll - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
We Got the Beat - Go-Go’s
Chariots of Fire - Titles - Vangelis
The Clown - Conway Twitty

1990 I’ll Be Your Everything - Tommy Page
Don’t Wanna Fall in Love - Jane Child
Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinead O’Connor
Five Minutes - Lorrie Morgan


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
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  #455  
Old 04-20-2008, 11:00 PM
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112th day of 2008 - 254 remaining.

Monday, April 21, 2008
KINDERGARTEN DAY.


Some things we take for granted, like kindergarten. It’s just the first chance most kids get to attend a formal school, right? Wrong.

A man named Friedrich Froebel actually invented kindergarten. Little Freddie was born on this day in 1782 in Germany. He grew up to become a teacher, author and toy maker.

Friedrich’s experience as an educator led him to the conclusion that playtime can be very instructive; an essential part of a child’s education. He founded the first kindergarten for this purpose in 1837 in Blankenburg, Germany.

This directed playtime led to his invention of a series of toys that were designed to stimulate learning. He called these toys, gifts. The mother of famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright gave her son some of these gifts ... in the form of maple wood blocks. Wright often spoke of the value the gifts had brought him throughout his life.

Nursery school and kindergarten as we know it are the direct results of the influence of Friedrich Froebel. The first public kindergarten in the U.S. was started by Conrad Poppenhusen in College Point, Queens, New York in 1870.

Now put your paper and paste away; it’s time to lie down on your mats.

Click, click, and click.


Events
April 21st.



1856 - The first rail train to pass over the mighty Mississippi River between Davenport, Iowa and Rock Island, IL made its journey across a newly completed bridge between the two rail centers.

1895 - Woodville Latham demonstrated the first use of a moving picture projected on a screen in New York City.

1940 - The radio program, Take It or Leave It, was first heard on CBS radio on this day. Bob Hawk offered contestants a top prize of $64. No, there were no lovely parting gifts or consolation prizes that we could find. Losers just left.

1949 - The prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for Broadcasting was presented to You Bet Your Life star, “The one, the only, Groucho Marx.” This was the first time the honor had been awarded to a comedian.

1956 - Leonard Ross, age 10, became the youngest prizewinner on a big-time quiz program. The youngster won $100,000 on The Big Surprise for knowing about his specialty: stocks! Hope he invested that dough wisely.

1959 - 1959 - The largest fish ever hooked by a rod and reel was landed by Alf Dean. Ol’ Alf told the fellas down at the marina about the 16-foot, 10-inch white shark that weighed in at 2,664 pounds! Wowzers! What kind of line do you think he used? Electric power line, maybe? Dean made the historic catch in South Australia.

1963 - The Beatles and The Rolling Stones met for the first time together, at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, England. The Stones opened show.

1969 - Japanese marathon runner Yoshiaki Unetani won the Boston Marathon by finishing first in a record field of 1,152.

1970 - Sportscaster Curt Gowdy was the recipient of the coveted George Foster Peabody Award for achievement in radio and television. Curt, a long-time voice of the Boston Red Sox, NBC and ABC Sports and syndicated programs (including The American Sportsman), was the first sports broadcaster to receive the honor.

1976 - A Cadillac convertible, the ‘last’ American-made rag-top automobile, rolled off the assembly line at GM’s Cadillac production facility in Detroit, MI. This ended a tradition that began in 1916. The tradition didn’t stay ended, however. A few years later, Chrysler Corporation, under chairman Lee Iacocca, began production once again of soft-top cars. Then Ford brought back the convertible Mustang and GM got back in the picture with the convertible Pontiac Sunbird and a new, smaller Cadillac version. It seems that the convertible is just too popular to disappear from the American auto scene!

1977 - The Broadway musical, Annie, opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Andrea McArdle was a shining star in the title role. Annie continued on the Great White Way until January 2, 1983.

1980 - America’s oldest long-distance race, the Boston Marathon, was touched by scandal this day. Actually, the race was sullied, tarnished and disgraced when Rosie Ruiz, a 26-year-old office worker, stunned the sports world when she crossed the finish line in a record time of 2 hours, 31 minutes and 56 seconds. Later, after an investigation, she was stripped of the honor of winning the marathon when evidence showed that she had not run the entire race.

1984 - Michael Jackson’s Thriller album slipped a couple of notches from number 1 to number 3 on the pop album charts. Michael needn’t have been too upset. Thriller was number one for 37 weeks, setting a record in music history for the longest run at the top.

1984 - David Palmer pitched only the fourth shortened, perfect game in major-league baseball history. Palmer was pitching the Montreal Expos to a 4-0 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals when the home plate umpire called the game in five innings when the rains came. Palmer had made 57 pitches.

1986 - The once-notorious Lexington Hotel in Chicago received a visitor, in the person of Geraldo Rivera, along with a camera crew. A record audience watched as the long-sealed vault of racketeer, Al Capone was opened during a much-hyped TV special. Guess what? All that Geraldo found were broken bottles and no trace that Capone and his gang had ever stashed anything there.


Birthdays
April 21st.


1782 - Friedrich Froebel
teacher, author, toy maker: invented kindergarten; died June 21, 1852; see Kindergarten Day [above]

1816 - Charlotte Bronte
author: Jane Eyre, The Professor, Shirley, Villette; died Mar 31, 1855

1838 - John Muir
conservationist: influential in the establishment of the U.S. National Parks system and U.S. forest conservation; Muir Woods National Monument in California named after him; died Dec 24, 1914

1887 - Joe McCarthy
baseball manager: Chicago Cubs, NY Yankees, Boston Red Sox: holds record: highest winning percentage: [.615]; died Jan 13, 1978

1915 - Anthony Quinn
Academy Award-winning actor: Viva Zapata! [1952], Lust for Life [1956]; The Guns of Navarone, The Inheritance, The Old Man and the Sea, Zorba the Greek; died June 3, 2001

1919 - Don Cornell (Louis Varlaro)
singer: It isn’t Fair, I’ll Walk Alone, I’m Yours, Heart of My Heart, This is the Beginning of the End, Hold My Hand, The Bible Tells Me So, Most of All, Love is a Many-Splendored Thing; died Feb 23, 2004

1924 - Clara Ward
gospel singer: group: Clara Ward Gospel Troupe; died Jan 16, 1973

1926 - Queen Elizabeth II (Elisabeth Mary)
Queen of the United Kingdom [1952- ]; eldest daughter of George VI and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon; married Philip Mountbatten [1947]: four children: Charles [Prince of Wales], Anne, Andrew, Edward

1931 - Carl (Robert) Belew
country singer: Welcome Back to My World, songwriter: Am I That Easy to Forget?, Stop the World and Let Me Off, Lonely Street, What’s He Doing in My World?; died Oct 31, 1990

1932 - Elaine May
actress: California Suite; comedienne: half of a comedy duo with Mike Nichols; director: A New Leaf, The Heartbreak Kid, Ishtar, Mikey and Nicky

1935 - Charles Grodin
actor: Clifford, Beethoven I & II, Midnight Run, Dave; director, host: The Charles Grodin Show

1936 - Reg Fleming
hockey: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins, NY Rangers, Philadelphia Flyers, Buffalo Sabres

1939 - Ernie Maresca
entertainer: Shout! Shout! [Knock Yourself Out], songwriter: Runaround Sue, The Wanderer

1940 - Jacques Caron
hockey: NHL: LA Kings, SL Blues; coach: NJ Devils

1947 - Al (Alonza Benjamin) Bumbry (Bumbrey)
baseball: Baltimore Orioles (Rookie of the Year: 1973/World Series: 1979, 1983/all-star: 1980), SD Padres

1947 - Iggy Pop (James Newell Osterburg)
singer, songwriter: group: Psychedelic Stooges: LP: The Stooges

1947 - John Weider
musician: bass: group: Family: No Mule’s Fool, Weaver’s Answer, In My Own Time, Burlesque, LPs: Fearless, Bandstand

1949 - Patti LuPone
actress: Evita, Song Spinner, Driving Miss Daisy, Wise Guys, 1941, Life Goes On

1951 - Paul Carrack
musician: piano, singer, songwriter: groups: Noise to Go, Mike and the Mechanics, Ace: How Long; Squeeze: Goodbye Girl, Up the Junction, Cool for Cats; solo: LPs: Paul Carrack, Suburban Voodoo

1951 - Tony Danza
actor: Family Law, Who’s the Boss, Taxi, Angels in the Outfield, Baby Talk; TV talk show host: The Tony Danza Show [co-executive producer]

1958 - Andie (Rosalie Anderson) MacDowell
actress: Multiplicity, Unstrung Heroes, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Short Cuts, Groundhog Day, Green Card, sex lies and videotape, St. Elmo’s Fire, The Player, Greystroke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes

1959 - Robert Smith
musician: guitar, singer, songwriter: group: The Cure: A Forest, Charlotte Sometimes, Let’s Go to Bed, Love Cats, The Caterpillar, Inbetween Days.


Chart Toppers
April 21st.



1951 If - Perry Como
Mockingbird Hill - Les Paul & Mary Ford
Would I Love You - Patti Page
The Rhumba Boogie - Hank Snow

1959 Come Softly to Me - The Fleetwoods
I Need Your Love Tonight - Elvis Presley
(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I - Elvis Presley
White Lightning - George Jones

1967 Somethin’ Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
This is My Song - Petula Clark
A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You - The Monkees
Lonely Again - Eddy Arnold

1975 Philadelphia Freedom - The Elton John Band
(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song
- B.J. Thomas
He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) - Tony Orlando & Dawn
Always Wanting You - Merle Haggard

1983 Billy Jean - Michael Jackson
Come on Eileen - Dexys Midnight Runners
Mr. Roboto - Styx
Dixieland Delight - Alabama

1991 You’re in Love - Wilson Phillips
Baby Baby - Amy Grant
Joyride - Roxette
Down Home - Alabama


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #456  
Old 04-21-2008, 11:00 PM
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113th day of 2008 - 253 remaining.

Tuesday, April 22, 2008
EGG ROLL DAY.


On this day in 1878, the first Egg Roll was held on the grounds of the White House in Washington, DC. The first president on hand for the first Egg Roll was Rutherford B. Hayes. He and his wife Lucy made it an official event. It has been held every year since, except during the war years of WWI and WWII through 1953. The president who brought the tradition back in 1953 was Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In truth, there had been egg rolls in Washington, D.C. as far back as the mid-1860s, but they had been held on the rolling green hills of the Capitol Building. Since the grounds of the Capitol were looking pretty shabby after the 1876 Easter event, the U.S. Congress passed a law preventing the lawns at the Capitol from being used for any children’s activities ... including egg hunting and rolling. Rain washed out the first opportunity for a White House egg roll in 1877. But, President Hayes came to the children’s rescue for the next year’s Easter Monday.

Today, the Egg Roll is still held the day after Easter on the South Lawn of the White House, hosted by the President of the United States and the First Lady. The Vice President and his wife also attend the event as do other noted celebrities, including the official White House Easter Bunny. The Egg Roll usually follows a traditional Easter Egg Hunt on the grounds, as well. Roll on!

More here, and here.



Events
April 22nd.


1793 - Philadelphia played host to the first circus attended by George Washington. It would be years before Congress provided a two-ring circus of its own for the President!

1864 - The U.S. Congress mandated that all coins minted as U.S. currency bear the inscription “In God We Trust.”

1876 - An eight-team National League began its inaugural season on this day in 1876. A crowd of 3,000 watched as Boston defeated Philadelphia 6-5. The opening season consisted of 70 games -- a lot less than the 162 game season (barring strikes) played today -- and no playoffs! These are the cities that were home to the original eight National League teams: Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Hartford, Louisville, New York, Philadelphia and St. Louis. Today, Boston is in the American League, Hartford and Louisville don’t have teams in either league, and Atlanta, Montreal, Houston, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, Colorado and Florida join the rest of the original teams as members of baseball’s National League.

1889 - Land Ho! At noon, the sound of a gun shot was the only signal needed for thousands of settlers to rush into the Oklahoma territory to claim their pieces of land. The U.S. Federal government had purchased almost two million acres of land in Central Oklahoma from the Crete and Seminole Indians and opened it up on this day to the settlers to claim their stakes. The purchase was made under pressure of cattle ranchers who needed more land for grazing.

1914 - Babe Ruth, playing for the Baltimore Orioles, made his pitching debut in pro ball. He shut out the Buffalo Bisons, 6-0.

1931 - A contraption known as the autogyro landed on the lawn of the White House. Before the Secret Service could come out with guns blazing, President Herbert Hoover shook hands with pilot, James G. Ray, and gave him a trophy! Don’t try this today.

1940 - The first all-Chinese commercial radio program was broadcast over KSAN radio in San Francisco, CA. Later, KSAN would become a pioneer in playing ‘underground rock’ music which, to many, must have sounded like Chinese, too...

1946 - Tex McCrary and Jinx Falkenburg arrived at WEAF radio in New York City with an entertaining morning show called, Hi, Jinx. WEAF later became WNBC and then WFAN SportsRadio 66.

1956 - Elvis Presley made his Las Vegas debut on this night at the Frontier Hotel. With Heartbreak Hotel at the top of the pop charts, one can imagine the excitement generated by the new ‘King of rock and roll’. Even with a number one hit, Elvis was not yet well-received by the middle-aged audience. Management of the Frontier was so unimpressed, they gave Elvis his walking papers after one week of a two-week engagement.

1959 - The Chicago White Sox took ‘batting practice’ against the Kansas City Athletics, 20-6. Chicago scored 11 runs in the seventh inning with only one hit, a single by Johnny Callison. The Sox got 10 walks and one hit batted. Not to be outdone in the effort, the Athletics contributed three errors.

1962 - The Toronto Maple Leafs won back the Stanley Cup after 11 years. The National Hockey League champions kept Lord Stanley’s cup locked up in Toronto for the next three seasons.

1967 - Randy Matson set a world outdoor record in the shot put with a toss of 71 feet, 5-1/2 inches in College Station, Texas. The shot landed in section E-83 of the grandstand, but fortunately, no one was hurt.

1970 - Tom Seaver of the New York Mets struck out 19 batters to tie a National League baseball record. He also set a record by striking out 10 batters consecutively as the ‘Amazing’ Mets defeated the San Diego Padres at Shea Stadium.

1970 - H. Ross Perot, a future candidate for the U.S. Presidency, did not have a good day. Perot, of Dallas, TX, reportedly lost $450 million in the stock market. As some people say, “Some days you win some. Some days you lose some.”

1970 - The first Earth Day was observed -- with the purpose of reclaiming the purity of the air we breathe, the water we drink and the environment we live in. With the slogan “Give Earth a Chance,” Earth Day continues to be celebrated on this anniversary or on the vernal equinox.

1974 - Redbone won a gold record for the single, Come and Get Your Love. The group, playing American Indian ‘swamp rock’, formed in Los Angeles in 1968. Lolly and Pat Vegas, brothers, had been session musicians and worked on the Shindig TV show. Anthony Bellamy and Peter De Poe were also members of the group. Redbone had one other hit, The Witch Queen of New Orleans. The top five hit, Come and Get Your Love, was the group’s second and final chart success.

1985 - Washington and Lee University researchers reported this day that Martha Washington had 29,650 pounds when she and George were married. Now, before you smart alecks start making cracks about the ‘Father of Our Country’ liking cuddly women, we’d like you to know that 29,650 pounds was worth $5.9 million on their wedding day.


Birthdays
April 22nd.


1707 - Henry Fielding
author: The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling; died Oct 8, 1754

1724 - Immanuel Kant
philosopher: The Critique of Pure Reason; died Feb 12, 1804

1870 - Nikolai Lenin (Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov)
Russian premier [1917-1924]; died Jan 21, 1924

1904 - J. (Julius) Robert Oppenheimer
physicist: Enrico Fermi Award for work in nuclear physics: designed & built 1st atomic bomb; died Feb 18, 1967

1906 - Eddie Albert (Edward Albert Heimberger)
actor: Green Acres, Teahouse of the August Moon, Roman Holiday; died May 26, 2005

1916 - Yehudi Menuhin
violinist: child prodigy: solo with San Francisco Orchestra at age of 7, played with New York Symphony Orchestra at ten; died Mar 12, 1999

1918 - Mickey (James Barton) Vernon
baseball: Washington Nationals [all-star: 1946, 1948, 1953, 1954, 1955], Cleveland Indians [all-star: 1958], Boston Red Sox [all-star: 1956], Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates

1920 - Hal March (Mendelson)
TV emcee: What’s It For, The $64,000 Question, Laughs for Sale; actor: My Friend Irma, The Soldiers, The Imogene Coca Show, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; died Jan 19, 1970

1921 - Candido Camero
musician: bongos, congas, tres, bass: performed/recorded w/George Shearing, Stan Kenton, Dizzy Gillespie, Dinah Washington, Tito Puente, Machito

1922 - Richard Diebenkorn
artist: Touched Red, Ochre, Flotsam, Green; died Mar 30, 1993

1922 - Charles Mingus
musician: bassist, piano; singer, bandleader, composer: 20th century black music; died Jan 5, 1979

1923 - Aaron Spelling
Emmy Award-winning executive producer: Day One, AT&T Presents [1988-1989], And the Band Played On [1993-1994]; Charlie’s Angels, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place; died June 23, 2006

1933 - Mark Damon (Alan Harris)
actor: Black Sabbath, Between Heaven and Hell, The Fall of the House of Usher

1936 - Glen Campbell
Grammy Award-winning singer: By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Gentle on My Mind, CMA Entertainer of the Year [1968]; Galveston, Wichita Lineman, Southern Nights, Rhinestone Cowboy; TV host: The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour; actor: True Grit, Norwood, Strange Homecoming

1937 - (John Joseph) Jack Nicholson
Academy Award-winning actor: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975], Terms of Endearment [1983], As Good as It Gets [1997]; Five Easy Pieces, The Shining, Batman, Broadcast News, Chinatown, Easy Rider, Prizzi’s Honor, The Witches of Eastwicke, Little Shop of Horrors, A Few Good Men

1938 - Deane Beman
golf: champ: U.S. Amateur twice and British Amateur once; first commissioner of PGA Tour [1974-1994]; created stadium golf

1939 - Mel Carter
singer: Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me; actor: Quincy, Sanford and Son, Marcus Welby, M.D., Magnum P.I.

1939 - Jason Miller
Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning playwright: That Championship Season [1973]; actor: Mommy, Murdered Innocence, Small Kill, Light of Day, Toy Soldiers, Monsignor, The Exorcist series, The Ninth Configuration; died May 13, 2001

1949 - Spencer Haywood
basketball: U.S. Olympic team [gold medal: 1968], University of Detroit [1st player to leave college early for the pros], Denver Rockets [ABA Most Valuable Player/Rookie of the Year: 1970], LA Lakers

1950 - Peter Frampton
guitarist, singer: Show Me the Way, Do You Feel Like We Do, I Can’t Stand it No More

1953 - Tom Lysiak
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Chicago Blackhawks

1954 - Joseph Bottoms
actor: The Black Hole, Holocaust, Liar’s Edge, Treacherous Crossing, Surfacing, The Dove, Inner Sanctum

1961 - Byron Allen
comedian, TV host: Entertainers, Byron Allen Show, Real People, Jammin’; producer, writer, actor: Case Closed

1964 - Chris Makepeace
actor: My Bodyguard, Vamp, Undergrads, Last Chase, Aloha Summer, The Terry Fox Story, Captive Hearts.


Chart Toppers
April 22nd.


1944 It’s Love, Love, Love - The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
I Love You - Bing Crosby
Poinciana - Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry - Al Dexter

1952 Wheel of Fortune - Kay Starr
Anytime - Eddie Fisher
Be My Life’s Companion - The Mills Brothers
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There - Carl Smith

1960 The Theme from "A Summer Place" - Percy Faith
Greenfields - The Brothers Four
Sweet Nothin’s - Brenda Lee
He’ll Have to Go - Jim Reeves

1968 Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
Cry like a Baby - The Box Tops
Lady Madonna - The Beatles
Fist City - Loretta Lynn

1976 Disco Lady - Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow - Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale
Drinkin’ My Baby (Off My Mind) - Eddie Rabbitt

1984 Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) - Phil Collins
Hello - Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now - The Thompson Twins
The Yellow Rose - Johnny Lee with Lane Brody


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
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Old 04-22-2008, 11:00 PM
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Wednesday, April 23, 2008
SLAY A DRAGON DAY.


In Greek mythology, Perseus slew a monster that threatened Andromeda. Not to be outdone, the Crusaders from the 1300s told the story of Saint George. George used his magic sword to kill a dragon ... just in the nick of time to save the king’s daughter from being sacrificed to the fire-breathing beast. As the story goes, this dragon had an insatiable appetite and it was only through his deep faith that George was able to accomplish this deed.

Little factual information is known about Saint George other than his becoming a soldier and rising to a high rank under Diocletian. Because of his strong and open belief in Christianity, he was arrested, tortured and put to death at Nicomedia on this day in 303 A.D.

He was so revered by the Crusaders, that George was named Patron Saint of England in 1350 A.D. For many years, English soldiers wore the red cross of St. George on a white background as a badge; and it remains a part of the British Union flag.

The martyred hero is still honored throughout England on this day, Saint George Feast Day.

More here, and here.

Events
April 23rd.



1772 - Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle wrote one of the world’s most familiar -- and beautiful -- national anthems. La Marseillaise is still proudly sung by the French citizenry today.

1789 - Courier De Boston was published for the first time in, of course, Boston, MA. It was the first Roman Catholic magazine in the United States.

1872 - Charlotte E. Ray became the first black woman lawyer -- in ceremonies held in Washington, DC.

1900 - The word, hillbilly, was first used in print in an article in the New York Journal. It was spelled a little differently, as the story said that a Hill-Billie was a “free and untrammelled white citizen of Alabama, who lives in the hills.” The article continued that “he has no means to speak of, dresses as he can, talks as he pleases, drinks whiskey when he gets it and fires off his revolver as the fancy takes him.”

1921 - Charles Paddock set a record time in the 300-meter track event by posting a time of 33.2 seconds. There is a zoo named after Paddock in Atascadero, CA. The cheetah at the zoo is probably the only animal that can run faster than Paddock did.

1948 - Johnny Longden became the first race jockey to ride 3,000 career winners as he set the mark at Bay Meadows in San Mateo, CA.

1951 - The Associated Press began use of its new Teletypesetter circuit. The AP provided a perforated, paper-tape message to a news bureau in Charlotte, North Carolina. The message was then fed to a monitor for preparation into a printer. From there, the newspaper copy was completed.

1954 - Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves hit his first major-league home run on this day.

1963 - Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds got his first hit in the major leagues. It was a booming triple off the Pirates’ Bob Friend. ‘Charlie Hustle’ went on to break Ty Cobb’s all-time hitting record more than 20 years later, playing for the Reds, the Phillies and the Expos.

1964 - Ken Johnson of the Houston Colts will certainly never forget this day. Johnson tossed the first no-hit game -- for a loss -- in baseball history. Cincinnati’s Reds beat Johnson’s no hitter by a score of 1-0. The Reds capitalized on two costly Houston errors. We wonder what Johnson had to say in the locker room...

1985 - This was a big day for the flamboyant Liberace. Lee, as he was called by those close to him, first appeared on the TV soap opera, Another World. The sequined and well-furred pianist appeared as a fan of Felicia Gallant, a romance novelist. Later in the day, Liberace was a guest video jockey on MTV!

1985 - The Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta, GA, made a showy, glitzy announcement that it was changing its 99-year-old secret formula. New Coke was called “the most significant soft drink development” in the company’s history. Yeah, well, so much for history. Fans of the original Coke were instrumental in bringing Classic Coke back. The way they did it was, actually, quite ingenious. They didn’t buy the new Coke and it turned out to be one of the biggest corporate flops ever.

1985 - The first musical to win a Pulitzer Prize in over a decade was Sunday in the Park with George. Also on this day, Studs Terkel earned his first Pulitzer for The Good War: An Oral History of World War II.

1987 - Business Week magazine announced its list of the highest paid executives in the U.S. Lee Iacocca of Chrysler Corporation topped the list, followed by Paul Fireman of Reebok International.


Birthdays
April 23rd.


1564 - William Shakespeare
poet, playwright: Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, MacBeth and at least three dozen more plays and over 150 sonnets; died Apr 23, 1616

1791 - James Buchanan
15th U.S. President [1857-1861]; never married; nickname: Old Buck [died June 1, 1868]

1813 - Stephen Douglas
Illinois politician who beat Abraham Lincoln for a seat in the state legislature; died June 3, 1861

1891 - Sergei Prokofiev
pianist, composer: Peter and the Wolf; opera: The Love for Three Oranges, The Fiery Angel, War and Peace; ballet: Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella; film scores: Alexander Nevsky, Ivan the Terrible, Lieutenant Kije; symphonies: Classical Symphony, The Fifth Symphony; Piano Concertos Nos. 1-5; died Mar 5, 1953

1916 - (Charles Burnham) Bud Wilkinson
football: Minnesota Golden Gophers: on national championship teams [1934-1936]; coach: Oklahoma Sooners [1947-1963]: 145-29-4 record, 3 national titles [1950, 1955, 1956], won 47 consecutive games [1953–1957: longest winning streak in modern football]; St. Louis Cardinals [1978-1879]; died Feb 9, 1994

1921 - Janet Blair (Martha Jane Lafferty)
actress: My Sister Eileen, The Fabulous Dorseys, The Fuller Brush Man, Black Arrow, Boy’s Night Out, Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood; died Feb 19, 2007

1928 - Shirley (Jane) Temple Black
child actress: Little Miss Marker, Curly Top, Heidi, The Little Colonel, Poor Little Rich Girl, Wee Willie Winkie, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm; U.S. delegate to the United Nations and chief of protocol

1930 - Alan Oppenheimer
actor: Murphy Brown, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Legend of Prince Valiant, Home Free, Eischied, Big Eddie, Trancers 4 and 5, Child of Darkness, Child of Light, The Bionic Woman, The Groundstar Conspiracy, Star!

1932 - (Roy) Halston (Frowick)
fashion designer: created famous pillbox hat [1962] worn by Jackie Kennedy at JFK's inaugural; his designs set standard for American designers in 1970s

1936 - Roy Orbison
singer: Only the Lonely, Running Scared, Oh, Pretty Woman, Crying, Dream Baby, It’s Over; died Dec 6, 1988

1937 - Don Massengale
golf: champ: PGA: Bing Crosby Celebrity Pro-Am [1966], Canadian Open [1966]; Senior PGA: Greater Grand Rapids Open [1990], Royal Caribbean Classic [1992]; National Club Professional [1972]

1939 - David Birney
actor: Oh, God! Book 2, Nightfall, Serpico [TV], St. Elsewhere, Great American TV Poll, Bridget Loves Bernie, Live Shot

1939 - Lee Majors (Harvey Lee Yeary II)
actor: The Six Million Dollar Man, Big Valley, The Bionic Woman, The Covergirl Murders

1939 - Ray Peterson
singer: Tell Laura I Love Her, Corinna, Corinna, The Wonder of You; owner of Dunes record label; sang in film One Way Wahini: Wahine Does the Bird; died Jan 25, 2005

1942 - Sandra Dee (Alexandra Zuck)
actress: A Summer Place, Gidget, Tammy and the Doctor; died Feb 20, 2005

1943 - Tony (Anthony James) Esposito
Hockey Hall of Famer: NHL: Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks [Calder Memorial Trophy: NHL’s outstanding rookie: 1969-1970/all-star: 1970, 1972, 1980/shared Vezina Trophy for best goaltender [1972, 1974]; played 886 games in NHL, winning 423, losing 307, earning draw in 151; 76 shutouts with a 2.92 goals-against-average; in 99 playoff games, Tony won 45, lost 53 with a 3.07 average; shared goaltending duties with Ken Dryden in 1972 when Team Canada played the Soviet Nationals in famed Series of the Century [Canada edged Soviets, four games to three w/one tied]; brother of Hockey Hall of Famer, Phil Esposito

1943 - Hervé Villechaize
actor: Fantasy Island, The Man with the Golden Gun, Rumpelstiltskin, Two Moon Junction; died Sep 4, 1993

1944 - Marty Fleckman
golf: Univ. of Houston: [3 NCAA championship teams/individual title: 1965: two-day total of 135/All-American: 1965/medalist honors at Western Amateur: 1966/Walker Cup team: 1967]; pro: Cajun Classic champ: 1967; golf teacher: Meyer Park Golf Course, Houston

1947 - Bernadette Devlin (McAliskey)
Irish civil rights leader

1949 - Joyce DeWitt
actress: Three’s Company

1952 - Narada Michael Walden
musician: drums: groups: Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, w/Jeff Beck on LP Wired; singer: solo LPs: Garden of Love Light, Divine Emotion; record producer: Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Starship; songwriter: Jump to the Beat

1957 - Jan Hooks
actress: Designing Women, Saturday Night Live, The Martin Short Show, The 1/2 Hour Comedy Hour, A Dangerous Woman, Coneheads, Batman Returns, Pee Wee’s Big Adventure

1960 - Valerie (Anne) Bertinelli
actress: One Day at a Time, Silent Witness, Ordinary Heroes, Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp

1960 - Steve Clark
musician: guitar: group: Def Leppard: Photograph, Rock of Ages, Foolin’, LPs: On Through the Night, High’n’Dry, Pyromania, Hysteria; died Jan 8, 1991.


Chart Toppers
April 23rd.


1945 Candy - Johnny Mercer & Jo Stafford
I’m Beginning to See the Light - The Harry James Orchestra
(vocal: Kitty Kallen)
My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Smoke on the Water - Bob Wills

1953 Doggie in the Window - Patti Page
Pretend - Nat King Cole
I Believe - Frankie Laine
Your Cheatin’ Heart - Hank Williams

1961 Blue Moon - The Marcels
Runaway - Del Shannon
Mother-In-Law - Ernie K-Doe
Don’t Worry - Marty Robbins

1969 Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In - The 5th Dimension
You’ve Made Me So Very Happy - Blood, Sweat & Tears
It’s Your Thing - The Isley Brothers
Galveston - Glen Campbell

1977 Don’t Leave Me This Way - Thelma Houston
Southern Nights - Glen Campbell
Hotel California - Eagles
She’s Got You - Loretta Lynn

1985 We are the World - USA for Africa
Crazy for You - Madonna
Nightshift - Commodores
I Need More of You - Bellamy Brothers


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
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Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:00 PM
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Thursday, April 24, 2008
PIPELESS ORGAN DAY.


It was on this date in Chicago, IL that Laurens Hammond announced news that would be favored by many churches across the United States. The news was the development of the pipeless organ -- and a granting of a U.S. patent for same. The year was 1934.

Hammond, a decades-old name in keyboard organs in churches, theaters, auditoriums and homes, is the same Hammond who fostered many of the developments that would make electronic keyboards so popular in modern music. The Hammond B-3 and B-5 organs, for example, became mainstays for many recording artists, while inventions in Hammond organ loud speaker development (the Hammond Leslie Tremelo speaker) produced still other important milestones that allowed small organs to emulate the big concert theater console organs.

Later, solid-state circuitry and computers allowed keyboards the flexibility to sound like other instruments, permitting the organist to play many instruments from the organ’s multiple keyboards.

And you thought there was an entire orchestra hiding in the closet ...

Click. click.


Events
April 24th.


1901 - Four games were scheduled to open the brand new American League baseball season. Three of them, however, were rained out. The Chicago White Stockings beat the Cleveland Blues 8-2 before a paid crowd of over 10,000 fans in the only game played. The new league, nicknamed the junior circuit, was made up of teams in Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. Buffalo, Indianapolis and, initially, Minneapolis, fell out of the league, with new teams in Boston, New York, Baltimore, Washington D.C. and, later, Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle, Ft. Worth and Toronto joining the American League.

1936 - Benny Goodman and his trio recorded China Boy for Victor Records. Gene Krupa, Teddy Wilson and Goodman recorded the session in Chicago.

1945 - A new commissioner of baseball was named. He was Albert B. ‘Happy’ Chandler.

1949 - Dick Powell starred in Richard Diamond, Private Detective on NBC radio. The show stayed on the air for four years. Later, it would have a three-year run on TV starring David Janssen in the title role.

1952 - Raymond Burr made his TV acting debut on the Gruen Guild Playhouse in an episode titled, The Tiger. Not long after this start, Burr would be seen in the hugely popular Perry Mason and much later in Ironside.

1954 - Billboard magazine, the music industry trade publication, headlined a change to come about in the music biz. The headline read, “Teenagers Demand Music with a Beat -- Spur Rhythm and Blues” ... a sign of times to come. Within a year, R&B music by both black and white artists caught the public’s fancy.

1955 - X-Minus One, a show for science fiction fans, was first heard on NBC radio this day.

1959 - Your Hit Parade ended after a nine-year run on television and many more years on radio. The show debuted in 1935. On the final show, these were the top five songs on Your Hit Parade:
1 - Come Softly to Me
2 - Pink Shoelaces
3 - Never Be Anyone Else but You
4 - It’s Just a Matter of Time
5 - I Need Your Love Tonight

1961 - Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers struck out 18 batters in a game this day, becoming the first major-league pitcher to do so on two different occasions.

1963 - Bob Cousy of the Boston Celtics retired from the NBA. Mr. Basketball’ wouldn’t give up the game, however, as he went on to coach Boston College to a record 117 wins and 38 losses.

1965 - Game of Love, by Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders, made it to the top spot on the Billboard music chart. Game of Love stayed for a short visit of one week, before Peter Noone and Herman’s Hermits took over the top spot with Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter.

1969 - The singing family, The Cowsills, received a gold record for their hit single, Hair, from the Broadway show of the same name.

1985 - There were a reported 832,602 millionaires in the United States on this day, according to researchers. The average millionaire was 57 years old. A majority (85 percent) held college degrees. 20 percent were retired and 70 percent were self-employed.


Birthdays
April 24th.


1743 - Edmund Cartwright
inventor: power loom; died Oct 30, 1823

1766 - Robert Bailey Thomas
founder, editor: The Farmer’s Almanac; died May 19, 1846

1836 - George Bascom
West Point officer who arrested Chief Cochise, who escaped and began the Apache Wars reign of terror

1904 - Willem de Kooning
painter/expressionist; died Mar 19, 1997

1905 - Robert Penn Warren
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: All the King’s Men [1947], poet: Promises:Poems, 1954-1956 [1958], Now and Then:Poems, 1976-1978 [1979]; 1st official poet laureate of U.S.; died Sep 15, 1989

1911 - Jack E. Leonard (Leonard Lebitsky)
comedian, actor: The Disorderly Orderly, Three Sailors and a Girl, Journey Back to Oz; died May 9, 1973

1916 - Stanley Kauffmann
theatre critic: The New Republic: Stanley Kauffmann on Films; writer: Distinguishing Features : Film Criticism and Comment, Persons of the Drama : Theater Criticism and Comment; film/theater teacher: Yale School of Drama, CUNY Graduate Center, Adelphi University, Hunter College; author: Notes from a Dark Street

1922 - (Samuel) Aaron Bell
jazz musician: bass: played w/Duke Ellington, Stan Kenton, Andy Kirk, Lucky Millinder, Teddy Wilson, Lester Young; composer, teacher; died July 28, 2003

1923 - Freddie Scott
singer: Hey Girl, Are You Lonely for Me

1928 - Johnny Griffin
jazz musician: tenor sax: Chicago Riffin’, Flying Home, Soft and Furry, Honeybucket

1934 - Shirley (Lee Foley) Boone
singer: married to singer Pat Boone since 1953; daughter of singer, Red Foley; group: The Boones [w/Pat and daughters Cherry, Linda Lee, Debby and Laura Gene]

1934 - Shirley MacLaine (Shirley MacLean Beaty)
Academy Award-winning actress: Terms of Endearment [1983]; Emmy awards: Shirley MacLaine: If They Could See Me Now [1974], Gypsy in My Soul [1976], Shirley MacLaine... Every Little Movement [1980]; Irma La Douce, The Turning Point; sister of actor Warren Beatty

1936 - Jill Ireland
actress: Assassination, Death Wish 2, Hard Times; author: Life Wish; activist: support of breast cancer victims; wife of actor Charles Bronson; died May 18, 1990

1937 - Joe Henderson
composer/musician: tenor sax: played in sextet at San Francisco’s Keystone Korner; also played with Blood Sweat and Tears; died June 30, 2001

1942 - Barbra (Joan) Streisand
Grammy Award-winning Best Female Pop Vocalist [1963-1965, 1977, 1986], Best Songwriter [1977]; People, The Way We Were, You Don’t Bring Me Flowers; Academy Award-winning Best Song [1976: shared w/Paul Williams]: Evergreen [Love Theme from A Star Is Born]; Academy Award-winning Best Actress: Funny Girl [1968]; I Can Get It for You Wholesale, The Owl and the Pussycat, Hello Dolly, Funny Lady, The Way We Were, Yentl; actress/director: Yentl, The Prince of Tides, The Mirror Has Two Faces

1943 - Richard Sterban
musician: bass, singer: group: The Oak Ridge Boys: Talk About the Good Times, Where the Soul Never Dies, Cryin’ Again, American Made, Love Song, I Guess It Never Hurts to Cry Sometimes, Everyday, Make My Life with You, Little Things, Touch a Hand Make a Friend

1944 - Bill Singer
‘The Singer Throwing Machine’: baseball: pitcher: LA Dodgers [all-star: 1969], California Angels [all-star: 1973], Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, Toronto Blue Jays

1945 - Doug Clifford
drummer: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Up Around the Bend

1945 - Bob Lunn
golf: six PGA Tour victories [no majors], par-3 contest champ [1969 Masters]

1947 - Glenn Cornick
musician: bass: groups: Wild Turkey: LPs: Battle Hymn, Turkey, Jethro Tull: Living in the Past, Sweet Dream, Witch’s Promise

1949 - Bob Chandler
football: Oakland Raiders wide receiver: Super Bowl XV

1953 - Eric Bogosian
actor: Under Siege 2: Dark Territory, Witch Hunt, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial, Special Effects; actor, playwright: Talk Radio, Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll: Eric Bogosian

1954 - Vince Ferragamo
football: QB: Univ. of California, LA Rams: Super Bowl XIV

1954 - Captain Sensible (Raymond Burns)
musician: bass, singer: Happy Talk, Wot, A Nice Cup of Tea, Brenda, Glad It’s All Over, Relax; group: The Damned: Neat Neat Neat, New Rose

1955 - Michael O’Keefe
actor: Three Wishes, Ironweed, The Great Santini, Caddyshack, Gray Lady Down, Mass Appeal, Roseanne, Middle Ages, Against the Law

1963 - Billy Gould
musician: bass: group: Faith No More: Epic

1964 - Paul Ryder
musician: bass: group: Happy Mondays: Step On, Kinky Afro

1977 - Eric Balfour
actor: Arresting Behavior, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, What Women Want.


Chart Toppers
April 24th.


1946 Oh, What It Seemed to Be - The Frankie Carle Orchestra (vocal: Marjorie
Hughes)
You Won’t Be Satisfied - The Les Brown Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day)
Day by Day - Frank Sinatra
Guitar Polka - Al Dexter

1954 Wanted - Perry Como
Here - Tony Martin
The Man with the Banjo - The Ames Brothers
Slowly - Webb Pierce

1962 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley
Mashed Potato Time - Dee Dee Sharp
Young World - Rick Nelson
Charlie’s Shoes - Billy Walker

1970 Let It Be - The Beatles
ABC - The Jackson 5
Spirit in the Sky - Norman Greenbaum
Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone - Charley Pride

1978 Night Fever - Bee Gees
If I Can’t Have You - Yvonne Elliman
Can’t Smile Without You - Barry Manilow
Every Time Two Fools Collide - Kenny Rogers & Dottie West

1986 Kiss - Prince & The Revolution
Manic Monday - Bangles
Addicted to Love - Robert Palmer
Cajun Moon - Ricky Skaggs


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
  #459  
Old 04-24-2008, 11:00 PM
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Friday, April 25, 2008
WE’RE ON THE MAP DAY.


When you are taking a trip and following a map, you take the word of the cartographer that the map names are accurate. Things were pretty much the same on this day in 1507. That’s when mapmaker and geographer Martin Waldseemuller of Germany explained why the world map he was making would show the new world as ‘Amerige’ (the land of Amerigo).

In his book, Cosmographiae Introductio, he wrote, “Inasmuch as both Europe and Asia received their names from women, I see no reason why any one should justly object to calling this part Amerige, i.e., the land of Amerigo, or America, after Amerigo, its discoverer, a man of great ability.”

And so, Waldseemuller printed one thousand maps with Amerige printed on the part of the world we now call South America. He was obviously talking about the explorations of Amerigo Vespucci; not learning of Columbus’ discovery until several years later (news traveled quite slowly in those days); and he, obviously, never had any discussions with the Incas. They might have had a few different suggestions as to what to call the land where they lived.

However, it wasn’t long before ‘America’ was applied to both the North and South American continents ... and, as you may have noted, America is still a part of our maps and our geography lessons. Because the name, America, stuck, some refer to Waldseemuller as the godfather of America.

That’s all there is to it. Make a map, proclaim your little corner of the world as Podunck Gulch or whatever, print ’em up, distribute them and you’ll leave your mark on history. Here we are over four hundred years later still trying to understand why America is called America by the entire world, and the only explanation is that it was on the map and still is.

More reading on the subject here.



Events
April 25th.


1831 - The New York and Harlem Railway was incorporated in New York City.

1928 - Buddy, the first seeing eye dog, was presented to Morris S. Frank on this day. Many seeing eye organizations and schools continue to offer specially trained dogs “...to enhance the independence, dignity, and self-confidence of blind people...”

1938 - Your Family and Mine, a radio serial, was first broadcast.

1940 - W2XBS (now WCBS-TV) in New York City presented the first circus on TV. No, it wasn’t a political debate or a daytime tabloid talk show. It was a three-hour special broadcast from Madison Square Garden.

1943 - Rufus Gentry, playing for Buffalo in the International Baseball League, tied a record originally set in 1916 by winning an 11-inning, no-hitter. Buffalo defeated Newark 1-0.

1946 - The popular Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra recorded Cement Mixer for Majestic records, tapes and CDs this day. Well, not tapes and CDs. We were still listening to 78s back then ... thick, heavy ones, at that.

1953 - NBC-TV presented Ethel and Albert, the video version of the popular radio show. Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce starred in the program.

1954 - The prototype manufacture of a new solar battery was announced by the Bell Laboratories in New York City.

1959 - The St. Lawrence Seaway opened to traffic, saving shippers millions of dollars. By going from the sea to the Great Lakes across upstate New York, folks no longer had to ship goods the long, costly over land.

1967 - Colorado Governor John Love signed the first law legalizing abortion in the United States. The law was limited to therapeutic abortions when agreed to, unanimously, by a panel of three physicians.

1970 - DJs around the U.S. played the new number one song, ABC, quite often, as The Jackson 5 reached the number one spot in pop music for two weeks. ABC was the second of four number one songs in a row for the group from Gary, IN. I Want You Back was their first. ABC was one of 23 hits for Michael, Tito, Jackie, Jermaine and Marlon. ABC was knocked out of first place by The Guess Who and their hit, American Woman. I’m Casey Kasem. And the countdown continues...

1972 - Bill Sharman, ending his first year as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, was named Coach of the Year in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Sharman had a first year record of 69 wins and 13 losses.

1973 - The group, The Sweet, received a gold record for the hit Little Willy. The English rocker band recorded four hits in addition to their first million-seller, Ballroom Blitz, Fox on the Run, Action and Love is like Oxygen. Little Willy was a top-three hit, while the group’s other gold record winner, Fox on the Run made it to the top five.

1985 - Big River (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) opened at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre on Broadway in New York City. The Tony Award-winning score for the show was written by Roger Miller (his first Broadway production). The show, about life on the Mississippi, with Daniel Jenkins in the starring role of Huck Finn, ran for 1,005 performances and won the Tony for Best Musical of the Year. Big River picked up several more Tony Awards: Featured Actor in a Musical to Ron Richardson; Best Director (Musical) to Des McAnuff; Best Book (Musical) to William Hauptman; and Best Scenic Designer and Lighting Designer to Heidi Landesman and Richard Riddell respectively.

1999 - More than 70,000 mourners gathered in Littleton, Colorado to honor the victims of the Columbine High School massacre five days earlier. “All of us must change our lives to honor these children,” Vice President Al Gore told the crowd a few blocks from the high school. “More than ever, I realize every one of us is responsible for all of the children.”


Birthdays
April 25th.


1874 - Guglielmo Marconi
‘Father of Radio’: inventor: 1909 Nobel Laureate in Physics: wireless telegraphy [the transmission of Morse Code over electromagnetic energy]; died July 19, 1937

1906 - William J. Brennan Jr.
Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court: authored more than 1,200 opinions, including many landmarks: free press [New York Times v. Sullivan], women’s rights [Frontiero v. Richardson], reapportionment [Baker v. Carr], civil rights [Cooper v. Aaron, Green v. County School Board]; died July 24, 1997

1908 - Edward R. (Roscoe) Murrow
newsman: You are There, Person to Person; former head U.S. Information Agency; died Apr 27, 1965

1913 - Earl Bostic
alto sax player, bandleader: Flamingo, Sleep, You Go to My Head, Cherokee, Temptation; died Oct 28, 1965

1915 - Sal Franzella
jazz musician: alto sax, clarinet: group: Sal Franzella & the Accordionaires: Yesterdays, Oh Marie, Paradise

1916 - Jerry Barber
golfer: PGA Champion [1961: Barber & Don January tied at 277, Barber won playoff 67 to 68]; died Sep 9, 1994

1917 - Ella Fitzgerald
Grammy Award-winning singer [12]: Bill Bailey Won’t You Please Come Home, Mack the Knife, A-Tisket, A-Tasket; died June 15, 1996

1921 - Melissa Hayden (Mildred Herman)
ballerina: New York City Ballet

1923 - Albert King (Nelson)
blues singer, guitarist: Don’t Throw Your Love on Me So Strong, Think Twice before You Speak, Born under a Bad Sign, Cold Feet; died Dec 21, 1992

1930 - Paul Mazursky
director: Harry and Tonto, An Unmarried Woman, Scenes from a Mall, The Pickle, Moscow on the Hudson, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Tempest

1932 - Willis ‘Gator’ Jackson
composer, tenor sax: invented the gator horn: Chuck’s Chuckles, Dance of the Lady Bug, Back Door, Later Gator; married to singer Ruth Brown; died Oct 25, 1987

1932 - Meadowlark (George) Lemon
basketball: Harlem Globetrotters

1933 - Jerry Leiber
record producer with Mike Stoller: Hard Times, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, Up on the Roof, On Broadway, Chapel of Love

1933 - J. Anthony Lukas
Pulitzer Prize-winning author: Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families; died June 5, 1997); died June 5, 1997

1935 - Robert Gutowski
U.S. pole vaulter: world record: 4.78m. [April 27, 1957

1940 - Al (Alfredo James) Pacino
Academy Award-winning actor: Scent of a Woman [1992]; Scarface, Serpico, The Godfather, Dick Tracy; Tony Award-winning actor: Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie [1969], The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel [1977]

1945 - Stu Cook
musician: bass: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Susie Q, Proud Mary, Keep on Chooglin’, Green River, Lodi, Bad Moon Rising, Wrote a Song for Everyone, Midnight Special, Down on the Corner, Up Around the Bend, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Who’ll Stop the Rain, Have You Ever Seen the Rain, Someday Never Comes

1945 - Bjorn Ulvaeus
musician: guitar, singer: group: Abba: Waterloo, Dancing Queen, I Have a Dream, LPs: The Album, Voulez-Vous, Super Trouper, The Visitors, Spanish Album, Arrival

1946 - Terry Hermeling
football: Washington Redskins tackle: Super Bowl VII

1946 - Talia Shire (Coppola)
actress: Godfather series, Rocky series, For Richer, For Poorer, A Century of Women, Blood Vows; sister of Producer/Director Francis Ford Coppola

1947 - Jeffrey DeMunn
actor: Ragtime, Frances The Shawshank Redemption, Rocket Man, The X Files, The Green Mile

1949 - Michael Brown (Lookofsky)
musician: keyboards: group: The Left Banke: Walk Away Renee, Pretty Ballerina, Desiree

1952 - Don Martineau
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings [all-star: 1976-1977]

1964 - Andy Bell
singer: group: Erasure: Sometimes, LP: Wonderland.


Chart Toppers
April 25th.


1947 Heartaches - The Ted Weems Orchestra (whistler: Elmo Tanner)
The Anniversary Song - Dinah Shore
Linda - Buddy Clark with the Ray Noble Orchestra
So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed - Merle Travis

1955 The Ballad of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes
Unchained Melody - Les Baxter
Unchained Melody - Al Hibler
In the Jailhouse Now - Webb Pierce

1963 He’s So Fine - The Chiffons
Can’t Get Used to Losing You - Andy Williams
I Will Follow Him - Little Peggy March
Still - Bill Anderson

1971 Joy to the World - Three Dog Night
Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean
Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5
Empty Arms - Sonny James

1979 Knock on Wood - Amii Stewart
Heart of Glass - Blondie
Music Box Dancer - Frank Mills
All I Ever Need is You - Kenny Rogers & Dottie West

1987 I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me) - Aretha Franklin & George Michael
Don’t Dream It’s Over - Crowded House
Sign ’o’ the Times - Prince
Rose in Paradise - Waylon Jennings


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
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Old 04-25-2008, 11:00 PM
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ShadowThomas ShadowThomas is offline
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117th day of 2008 - 249 remaining.

Saturday, April 26, 2008
ODD FELLOWS DAY.


The first Odd Fellows lodge in the U.S. was established in Baltimore, Maryland on this day in 1819. The official name of the organization is the Independent Order (of) Odd Fellows or IOOF. You can see these initials on many buildings in communities throughout the country. These are the Odd Fellows halls where the local, secret fraternal benefit meets. The first Odd Fellows group started in Great Britain in the 18th century.

The main focus of the fraternal order is “to relieve the brethren, bury the dead, and care for the widow and the orphan.” This focus has been broadened through the years to include the principles of friendship, love and truth.

The Odd Fellows maintain homes for the aged, the poor, widows and orphans and provide members with financial aid in sickness or death. U.S. national headquarters are located in Baltimore, MD and the membership of the order is more than 1.5 million.

More reading on the subject by clicking this link.

Events
April 26th.



1803 - Over 2,300 meteorite stones, weighing between one quarter ounce and 20 pounds, rained down on the people of L’Aigle in northeastern France. The meteorites poured down along an 8-mile-long strip in this little town, 100 miles west of Paris. No one was hurt; but it was the first time scientists could verify that stones could come from outer space.

1921 - Weather broadcasts were heard for the first time on radio when WEW in St. Louis, MO aired weather news. Weather forecasts continue to be the top reason why people listen to radio; rating higher than music, news, sports and commercials! A sunny day to you wherever you may be on the planet...

1931 - NBC radio presented Lum and Abner for the first time. The popular program continued for 24 years on the air, not all of them on NBC. In fact, all four networks (CBS, ABC, Mutual and NBC) carried the program for a period of time. Lum and Abner hailed from the fictitious town of Pine Ridge. Fictitious, that is, before 1936, when Waters, Arkansas, changed its name to Pine Ridge.

1932 - Ed Wynn was heard on radio’s Texaco Star Theater for the first time. Wynn, a popular vaudeville performer, demanded a live audience to react to his humor if he was to make the switch to radio. The network consented and Wynn became radio’s first true superstar. He would later make the switch to TV.

1937 - This was a tragic day in history as German planes attacked the town of Guernica in Northern Spain. Without warning, the planes swooped down on the sleepy village, subjecting the citizens to three hours of continuous bombing. The village was left in flames; those who survived the bombs and tried to escape to surrounding fields were shot down by machine-gun fire from the air.

1937 - The publisher of LIFE magazine just about passed out when he looked at his just-off-the-press publication and noticed that someone had forgotten to put the word “LIFE” in the upper left-hand corner! It was the only time that LIFE was nameless. Since hundreds of thousands of copies were already printed, the magazine hit the streets with no name on the cover! The reason? A picture of a rooster would have had an obscured comb if the logotype had been used in the upper left-hand corner as usual.

1937 - The initial broadcast of Lorenzo Jones was heard over NBC radio this day. Karl Swenson played the lead role for the entire run of the serial. And quite a run it was. Lorenzo Jones was on the air until 1955.

1952 - Patty Berg set a new record for major women’s golf competition. She shot a 64 over 18 holes in a tournament in Richmond, California.

1954 - Grace Kelly, “Hollywood’s brightest and busiest star,” was seen on the cover of LIFE magazine. In a couple of years, the actress would leave the U.S. to become Princess Grace of Monaco.

1964 - The Boston Celtics wrapped up an unprecedented sixth consecutive NBA championship. The Celtics still had two more crowns to win, however, before the string would come to an end.

1970 - The musical, Company, opened on Broadway. It ran for 705 performances before parting company with appreciative audiences at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Company starred Elaine Stritch.

1975 - On top of the Billboard popular music chart was B.J. Thomas, with the longest title ever for a number one song. (Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song was number one for one week, though it took that long just to say the title.

1978 - An updated version of Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper appeared on television. In the lead role (his first TV special), was former Beatle, Ringo Starr. He sang new versions of Act Naturally, Yellow Submarine and With a Little Help from My Friends. No tellin’ what Mark Twain might have said...

1983 - For the first time, the Dow Jones industrial average moved over the 1200 mark, just two months after smashing the 1100 barrier.

1986 - At 1:23 a.m. in Pripyat in the Ukraine when the Chernobyl atomic power station exploded. A three-hundred-square-mile area was evacuated in an attempt to protect over 100,000 residents of the area from radiation poisoning. 31 people died and unknown thousands were exposed as the radioactive material carried in the atmosphere spread throughout the world.

1987 - Tennis star Chris Evert won her 150th career tennis tournament. She beat Martina Navratilova in Houston, Texas.


Birthdays
April 26th.


1785 - John James Audubon
ornithologist, artist: the original Birdman; died Jan 27, 1851

1822 - Frederick Law Olmsted
landscape architect: Yosemite National Park, Central Park in New York City and other city parks in Boston, MA, Hartford, CT and Louisville, KY; died Aug 28, 1903

1882 - Jessie Redmon Fauset
author: There is Confusion, Plum Bun, The Chinaberry Tree, Comedy, American Style; literary editor: Crisis [NAACP publication]; co-publisher & editor: The Brownie Book; died in 1961

1886 - Gertrude ‘Ma’ Rainey (Gertrude Malissa Nix Pridgett)
‘Mother of the Blues’: singer: C.C. Rider [aka See See Rider], Jelly Bean Blues, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Bo Weavil Blues; died Dec 22, 1939

1893 - Anita Loos
author, playwright: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, I Married an Angel, San Francisco, Saratoga, The Women; died Aug 18, 1981

1900 - Charles Francis Richter
seismologist: invented the Richter scale for measuring the magnitude of earthquakes; died Apr 30, 1985

1900 - Douglas Sirk (Claus Detlef Sierck)
director: Imitation of Life, A Time to Love & a Time to Die, Tarnished Angels, Written on the Wind, Magnificent Obsession, First Legion; died Jan 14, 1987

1917 - Sal (Salvatore Anthony) Maglie
‘The Barber’: baseball: pitcher: NY Giants [all-star: 1951, 1952/World Series: 1951, 1954], Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers [World Series: 1956], NY Yankees, SL Cardinals; died Dec 28, 1992

1924 - (Theodore Marcus) Teddy Edwards
jazz musician: tenor sax: Me and My Lover; died Apr 20, 2003

1926 - Bambi Linn (Linnemier)
dancer, actress: Your Show of Shows, Oklahoma!

1927 - John Ralston
football: coach: Cal State Univ at San Jose, Stanford Univ; Coach/GM: Denver Broncos

1933 - Carol Burnett
Emmy Award-winning comedienne, actress: Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall [1962-1963], Carol & Company [1962-1963], Mad About You [1996-1997]; The Carol Burnett Show, Carol Burnett and Friends, The Garry Moore Show

1937 - Robert Boozer
basketball: Kansas State Univ., U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team [1960 gold medal]

1938 - Nino Benvenuti
International Boxing Hall of Famer: European Junior Middleweight title [1957, 1959], Olympic boxing gold medal [Rome, 1960], Junior Middleweight Champ [1965-1966], Ring Magazine Fighter of the Year [1968]; Middleweight Champ [1967-1970]; retired in 1971, total bouts: 90: won 82, lost 7, tied 1, knockouts 35

1938 - Maurice Williams
singer, songwriter: group: Zodiacs: Stay

1938 - Duane Eddy
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame guitarist: Rebel-’rouser, Forty Miles of Bad Road, Because They’re Young, Theme from Peter Gunn; actor: Because They’re Young, A Thunder of Drums, The Wild Westerners, The Savage Seven, Kona Coast

1941 - Claudine Clark
singer: Party Lights

1941 - (Dr.) Gary Cuozzo
football: Univ of Virginia all-American; NFL: QB: Baltimore Colts, NO Saints, Minnesota Vikings [Super Bowl IV], SL Cardinals; orthodontist [with his son] in Middletown NJ

1941 - Bruce MacGregor
hockey: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, NY Rangers; VP: Edmonton Oilers

1942 - Bobby Rydell (Robert Ridarelli)
singer: Wild One, We Got Love, Swingin’ School, Kissin’ Time, Volare, Forget Him; actor: Bye Bye Birdie, That Lady from Peking

1947 - Donna De Varona
Olympic Hall of Famer: 400-meter individual swimming medley [1964]; International Swimming Hall of Famer; International Women’s Sports Hall of Famer; sportscaster; founder of Women’s Sports Foundation

1947 - Boyd Matson
TV news anchor, correspondent: U.S.A. Today-The Television Series, The Real Story; TV host: National Geographic Explorer

1947 - Amos (Joseph) Otis
baseball: NY Mets, KC Royals [all-star: 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976], Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1980]

1958 - Giancarlo Esposito
actor: The Usual Suspects, Smoke, Reckless, Blue in the Face, Malcolm X, Do the Right Thing, Sweet Lorraine, Bakersfield P.D.


Chart Toppers
April 26th.


1948 Now is the Hour - Bing Crosby
Manana - Peggy Lee
The Dickey Bird Song - The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn Hughes)
Anytime - Eddy Arnold

1956 Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One - Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter
Ivory Tower - Cathy Carr
Blue Suede Shoes - Carl Perkins

1964 Can’t Buy Me Love - The Beatles
Twist and Shout - The Beatles
Do You Want to Know a Secret - The Beatles
Understand Your Man - Johnny Cash

1972 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack
Rockin’ Robin - Michael Jackson
I Gotcha - Joe Tex
Chantilly Lace - Jerry Lee Lewis

1980 Call Me - Blondie
Ride like the Wind - Christopher Cross
With You I’m Born Again - Billy Preston & Syreeta
A Lesson in Leavin’ - Dottie West

1988 Where Do Broken Hearts Go - Whitney Houston
Devil Inside - INXS
Wishing Well - Terence Trent D’Arby
I’ll Always Come Back - K.T. Oslin


Those were the days, my friend. We thought they’d never end...



For those who are reading this, be sure and stop in daily as I will
keep this updated daily. I use to do a, Today in history article daily
on my morning radio show.

All I ask of you, is to not to post in this thread, so that others
that view this thread will not have to scroll down to view the
contents.
Thanks for your understanding
.
__________________
The rock&roll band I run sound for.
Few rock tunes we do ....Smoke on the water, Road house blues, Creed,Higher..
Reply With Quote
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